A Ladies World

This topic contains 54 replies, has 18 voices, and was last updated by  Vina8 6 years, 11 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 55 total)
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  • #586

    mmpaints
    Participant

    What are some of the things you ladies take care of around your homes? What skills do you have?

    Me, I can shoot and hunt, butcher, I can do carpentry work and roof, I can repair my own farm equipment, I bale all our hay, I plant all our crops plus tend the gardens, I take care of all the animal husbandry and am the “vet” here including shots, stitches etc. I can, dehydrate, do all the cooking and cleaning( I live with slobs) I can sew, crochet, start a fire, chop wood, run a chainsaw, drive a stick, break horses…

    What do you ladies all do?

    #54837

    IceFire
    Moderator

    I also shoot and hunt (with shotgun, rifle, and bow); fish; clean my “catch”; do some minor carpentry work, have ripped up carpet and replaced flooring (did both laminate and tile), do all the painting, and minor plumbing things (repairing faucets and toilets); do all the gardening (to include building terraces on our hillside, tilling the beds, planting, etc); do the dehydrating and canning; do the cooking and cleaning; use a chainsaw (had to cut down one of my daughter’s pear trees due to fireblight infestation); take care of the animals, including suturing, giving shots, etc; I’ve had first aid training; I sew (including clothing and even making my own patterns) and quilt; and make soap and candles. I can alwo build a fire and chop wood (taught my girl scout and boy scout troops how to do it, too); know how to milk cattle and goats; ride horses; and drive a stick shift (actually learned how to drive in one). I also handle the minor household repairs.

    #54838

    kymber
    Member

    hmmm….i did a 10 year stint in the Canadian Forces so have much training in weapons, all kinds of weapons, i am pretty good at stripping and cleaning a variety of weapons and maintained a marksman average during my 10 years. while stationed in Kingston, Ontario, i worked what was called Base Defence Force – this was a specially trained military force that was called into our federal maximum security prison during prison riots – i was called out twice and it was not pretty. i served 2 tours of Alert, Ellesmere Island, Northwest Territories and i served my time there locked down in a compound for 6 months during the months of darkness – that was not pretty either.

    i grew up in a farming/fishing village and have shucked more scallops and baled more hay than i can count. i can catch and clean and prepare any fish. my dad took me and my sister hunting twice with our bee-bee guns and he taught us all about hunting. with my military weapons training i think my husband can teach me to hunt pretty easily once we move to our homestead full-time.

    i have been growing our own vegetables and herbs for the past 3 years and learned so much from of the women on the APN! This year i started canning and dehydrating and freezing the food that we grew.

    but MM – you are being just a smidge humble here in your list of abilities – smarten up gurl! you didn’t even mention your cheese!

    #54839

    Phelan
    Member

    I can do anything my husband refuses or forgets to do.

    Let’s see I am a classically trained chef,

    I can wax poetic

    I have been homesteading for almost 10 years. So the basics that come along with that.

    I butcher my own animals

    can just about everything I make

    milk all kinds of critters. And turn that milk into useful things besides drinking. Like paint or cheese.

    oh and I am really good at hurting myself and finding free range electricity.

    #54840

    mmpaints
    Participant

    Woohoo! I knew I was in good company!

    hey Phelan, do you make goat cheese? My goat is due in February, she’s big as a house. I’m kind of messy with the hand milking so I’m going to have to get better at it pretty darn quick and I don’t have a stand built yet(still unemployed here and we’re about out of savings). I make cows milk cheese pretty good but does goat go the same way or do I need calcium chloride for the goat milk to make cheddar and such?

    #54841

    Phelan
    Member

    I make the soft traditional cheese with goats. Haven’t ventured into hard cheeses with goats.

    Train your goat to a picnic table if you got one. Ours jumps up onto the old refrigerator that we use to store feed (it is laying on it’s side). If she has never been milked before, watch those back hooves, they can tear you up.

    I have 2 does due in March.

    #54842

    mmpaints
    Participant

    Well I’m sure gonna go right for the cheddar type cheeses and I want to learn to make the flaming greek cheese 😉 I haven’t found a milk cow yet so the goat will just have to do. She’s big as a house, maybe twins in there? If not, it’s one big baby.

    #54843

    autumnwear
    Member

    I dont have any farm critters as i live in town…just barely. I have much experience with horse, dogs, cats in their care and can do whatever is needed with them, for the most part,including minor injury care to foaling. I have learned to can and started dehydrating food this year as well. I can fix most things unless i need hubbys help lifting something. I have been studying herbs for several years and have added wild edibles as well. I can sew by hand or with a machine if need be as well, although i have no machine at the moment (need to get one). I also need to learn to read patterns- never learned that part unfortunately. I know i have much to learn but see i am in good company for that here.

    #54844

    Phelan
    Member

    Well shoot mmpaints, if you were closer I’d help you out in the milk department.

    now is a good time to buy a cow. My Long legged Dexters are going for half their price at auction. I know money is tight for you, it is here as well. Check craigslist as well, people that can’t afford to keep them will be selling them off for cheap. And make sure you find a hay guy close to you, and barter with him for feed.

    What kind of goat do you have? I have a Nupian and the others are nupian/alpine mixes. They tend to throw me out triplets.

    #54845

    mmpaints
    Participant

    Woohoo! Alpine/Nubians here too. Triplets won’t leave me much milk, LOL.

    I produce my own hay here so feeding them won’t be a problem. I’ll be picking up my Charlois steer calf pretty quick. It’s payment for work traded. Yah, even if the dang milker were free, I’d still not be able to do it, no fuel to go pick it up. We’re just about broke and still waiting on the call……….

    #54846

    ponymama44
    Member

    I run our horse farm while my husband is at work as a tugboat engineer on the ocean. We have goats, cows, chickens, dogs and guard goose. We will repeat our pig raising experiment thos summer. I would like to start bees but haven’t found the money for a hive yet. We only heat with firewood and I try to limit our grocery budget to $100/mo for the 5 of us so we can all of our veggies, drink our own goat and cow milk, eat our own beef, chicken pork and venison. I haven’t made cheese but will somehow carve out the time. We like cheese. A lot.
    I do all the cow adn goat milking, gardening, canning, horse breaking, vetting, first aid to children, dogs and goats . I do the butchering of chickens but I have a great butcher nearbyso I let him do the big stuff. We trade milk for a lamb everyyear. I do 90% of the cooking which I love and am learning to sew more than hems and buttons. I can shoot everything from pistols to shotguns and my husband and daughter have bows. Everyone but me fishes ( I know how but it is futile) and I have taught all the kids to ride and the horses to drive. If we have to go north or west, and there is no fuel, we can go.
    I still feel un prepared for bad times. I need to stock pile more ammo, store more goods, increase the medical stores and teach my kids to take careof themselves better. But hopefully we have time.

    About the goats, hard to teach how to milk but once they figure out that they get food while they are being milked, they are alrgiht. I have Saanens and they are good milkers. The yogurt is great but it is hard to keep the human kids away from the milk to get enough to make anything with. I will try cheese this year. last year we only had one to milk and she had twins. We only got milk 1 x a day until they were weaned at 2 months.
    Back to drudgery 🙂

    #54847

    mmpaints
    Participant

    ponymamma, you sound like me! I showed and raced for a while but it just got way too expensive and took too much time away from my farm duties. When I left to race or show, nothing got done!

    Good luck on teaching the kids, mine are 15 and 20 and every single day they act like they’ve never done chores before……

    #54848

    ponymama44
    Member

    OMG – it took my 8yo 30 minutes to drop 6 bales from the loft. In the meantime Ihad mucked 3 stalls, filled all the troughts, grained the stock adn prepped for milking. ARGH. And he lost his flash light and it took my 15 minutes to find it int he snow! Double Argh.

    did I mention that we home school?? my poor kids are under my thumb 24/7. but their manners and grammer are far more correct than most and we live by the motto “the more fun, the better!” Sadly tonight wans’t as much fun as iut should have been. 🙁

    #54849

    Vina8
    Member

    You all sound delightful and have all the skills I am just learning in my old age.

    My husband and I first started prepping a long time ago. We took the money from my husband’s annual bonus and bought books, supplies, and food for a year. Over the years and a few moves across the country we used and gave away some of the stuff although we have always kept much of the basics. I haven’t hunted yet, but as a child helped skin rabbits and squirrels. I also can kill and clean chickens thanks to my late grandmother. I can plant and raise a garden, make jam, can vegetables, grow sprouts, bake bread, and sew some. I took a sewing class in college just so I could learn the basics. We have done a lot of primitive camping and off-roading so I know how to rough it, and we are well stocked with tents, cooking gear, etc. A few years ago I took a woodworking class so can operate power tools and do some basic carpentry.

    We have made prepping a priority this winter. I am thrilled at how much information is available now in books and the internet. I am especially happy to have people like you to “chat” with since all my friends just think we are crazy. Here is a list of things I want to learn and plan to work on in the coming months:

    Small farm animals (rabbits, chickens, goats?) that we can raise for protein, milk, eggs in the case of SHTF. I really know nothing and fear getting in over my head.
    Hunting (deer, turkey, rabbits all of which we have on our land)
    EMT training–will take some classes at our local community college
    Medicinal herbs

    I look forward learning from all of you and hearing about your experiences.

    #54850

    kymber
    Member

    oh MountainMama – so glad to have a fruit expert here….gonna need your expertise!!!

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