A Ladies World

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 55 total)
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  • #54851
    kymber
    Member

    SciFi – MM asked us to list our skills and whatnot and you got a ton – alot of them learned in the past year. and hey – you really need to stick up your food saver vid – most of us on the network had never even thought of that until you shared it with us!

    i must agree with you tho….You and these ladies blow me away too!

    #54852
    Marica
    Member

    Unbelievable. Oh wait, not really! It’s very believable. And awesome. And inspiring!

    #54853
    Phelan
    Member

    agree with Kymber there Sci. Besides we all have different skills. Want to learn chainmaille, I’m your gal. Want to crochet, don’t look at me. We all have our different ways of doing the same things as well. So just because you think we all already know how to do something, you should still share how you do it, it might be easier than our way.

    #54854
    kymber
    Member

    teehee. it was fun “making you do it”! and you forgot to mention that you are a kinda’ mad scientist with the food saver….get that video up!!!! you can show off hubby’s crazy camera angles as well – bahahahaha!

    #54855
    Vina8
    Member

    @SciFiChick wrote:

    I LOVE dehydrating. I am working on learning to make bread. ( Right now I bake all our bread in a $4 bread machine I found at a thrift store.) 😉

    Good information, SciFi. I am just starting to think about dehydrating. Maybe this should be another thread, but I would love to know your method. Do you use a commercial dehydrator or something homemade? I have a garage full of apples that I brought home from my parents’ orchard that are keeping pretty well, but would be great for drying. I have made all the applesauce and apple butter that we will consume.

    Regarding making bread, we switched from using a bread machine to No Knead Bread. We have gotten pretty good at it (actually my husband is the baker and I am the eater) and the bread is the best I have ever eaten–crusty, tender, tasty. Here is a blog that he started that explains it pretty well and has some good links. http://www.nokneadbread.org/” onclick=”window.open(this.href);return false

    #54856
    mmpaints
    Participant

    Very cool MountainMamma, I hadn’t seen that site yet. I bookmarked it so I can view it at my leisure later on.

    I have a breadman pro in the cabinet. I used to use it all the time and then I found Hillbillyhousewife and her cool site and learned what I’d been doing wrong for so many years making bread. The machine had sat in the cabinet getting dusty since 2003 until the day after Christmas. I was tired and threw an old recipe in there. Needless to say, I was disappointed by the loaf and it went back in the cabinet. Now I’ll prolly try to sell it cheap. I won’t use it again.

    Ah, what about apple pie filling Mamma? You didn’t can yourself any of that? It’s pretty easy, about the same as making apple butter without the smashing and it makes such wonderful pies.

    #54857
    Vina8
    Member

    I haven’t canned the pie filling yet–actually, it is because I need to get some more jars. I think I will try to get some free/cheap ones as described on some other threads on this site. But I do make what people here in the South call “fried apples” and fried apple pies for immediate consumption. Now that the holidays are over, I will have to get in gear and can some. It sure does make the house smell good–baking bread, cooked apples and cinnamon.

    #54858
    mmpaints
    Participant

    Oh yah it does! And the satisfy the sweet tooth thing, you just can not go wrong there.

    #54859
    mmpaints
    Participant

    My favorite thing is dehydrating/canning because when folks eat with us and love the food, I get the chance to talk about it all and how I grew everything they ate, etc.

    #54860
    kymber
    Member

    oh man. you ladies make my freakin heart sing. it’s almost unbelievable…except for the fact that it’s right in front of my face. holy moly!

    #54861
    thriftymmm
    Member

    hey, i have a question for ponymamma44—-how do you do it? 100.00 a month for groceries. I am assuming you not counting the things you grow yourself or butcher. Last week i went to the grocery store and spent 100.00 and got enough food for the 4 of us to eaton for about 3 days.

    #54862
    mmpaints
    Participant

    Thrify, i grow my own food and I don’t spend 100.00 a month on flour, salt, sugar and such.

    #54863
    kymber
    Member

    thriftymmm – do you use coupons? you can really save a lot by using coupons and only buying things when they are on sale – you will need to have a pretty stocked pantry in order to do this but it can be done. we have some coupon experts here who can help.

    #54864

    Wow! You Gals are one evermore talented group to say the least!
    My unusual skill group consists of :
    Running a 900 line blind board telephone switchboard – a la “One Ringy Dingy – Two – Ringy Dingy – Headsets – spaghetti pairs of lines et al.
    A First Responder on Volunteer Rescue Squads in my late 20’s . In our own HVAC biz with Honey the last 26 years… I’m still a better Oxy-Acetylene Torch Blind Welder {for seams you can’t SEE on the BOTTOM of a weld join} than Honey & before having half my neck surgically fused together in the mid-80’s – I was the other HALF of our residential HVAC service & equipment retrofitting contracting business. I installed & serviced HVAC equipment with the big boys & loved every minute of it. Honey works alone these days – but I still have about a 80-95% diagnostics accuracy rate over the phone – from 26 years of mini-trouble shooting BEFORE sending Honey all over the place for parts n such no Std. stock on the truck.

    I’m a self-taught mult-media crafter – stained glass painter, crocheter – needle felter – needle tatter – & experienced “beginner knitter” – I became a rabid computer junkie & digital photographer, photo-restoration & graphics design freak when I turned 50… That was 7 years & several computers ago – Since then I’ve moved onto becoming a Rabid Luxury Fiber Hand-Spinner & even as my disabilities steal my independent mobility & some fine motor skills & I’m STILL the queen of over-coming or lemonade making! I just create different workaround solutions to get ‘er done!

    I currently design & build my own line of uniquely adaptive electronic spinning wheels – hand powered spinners & other spinning toys & tools. I’m also a Babe Fiber Garden – Spinning Wheel Dealer with several wheels set up in my home for drive by – “test-spins” & lessons. I even teach spinning online free to anyone who wants to learn the basics via Skype. Especially handy to know now that the timeless home arts are not only popular but NECESSARY in our tanking economy. Tell a child mesmerized watching spellbound as my spinning wheels spin… HOW MUCH “yarn” or string – do you think it’d TAKE to make your jean shorts??? Watch their new appreciation for spinning – when you TELL them it’s about 7 miles’ worth!

    I’m often asked WHAT DO YOU DO – with ALL THAT YARN??? The obvious answer is – What do YOU use to Knit – Crochet – or Weave WITH??? The difference with hand-spinning is that your luxury handspun yarns are about the same cost as el cheapo Wally World synthetic acrylic yarns!

    I’m also a DIY heart & diabetic healthy recipe generator & stockpiling junkie – having been a prepper these 26 yrs of never having a regular income from being self-employed in a foul or EXTREME weather comfort service industry business. That about covers my basic skills list. – I think… Glad to FIND & meet you ALL – Teri

    #54865
    ponymama44
    Member

    @thriftymmm wrote:

    hey, i have a question for ponymamma44—-how do you do it? 100.00 a month for groceries. I am assuming you not counting the things you grow yourself or butcher. Last week i went to the grocery store and spent 100.00 and got enough food for the 4 of us to eaton for about 3 days.

    Well, it is not easy. Mostly, we dont eat out. I make everything from scratch. I only use commercial stuff like spagetti, sugar, baking powder, flour, coffee. Left overs have as many lives as it takes. I am not counting the home grown stuff but that is pretty frugal too -consider the price of a deer tag, 22 cent bullet, freezer paper – venison is pretty cheap. We did pigs for the first time last year and long story short, $1.96/pound total. Putting a lamb in the freezer including trade off value of milk, butchering and transport – this year it was $1.07/lb for organic grass fed lamb.
    Point is the meat and eggs and milk is pretty inexpensive if you do it yourself. That is the key to cutting the bills down. I looked at 6 consecutive months of the “old grocery bills” and we averaged $160/month on dairy products alone. Now I do evertthing but my own cheese and soon, soon. It costs me $1.5/day in hay and $15/month in supplemental grain so $60/month AND I sell or trade about $15-18/week in milk(5-6 gallons at $3/gal) so I make enough tto splurge on cheese 🙂 For us it was dairy – but for you it may be fresh veggies or starches. It is wicked cheap to make your own bread. And I think when I learn how to dehydrate, get my laundry room finished being converted so I can grow lettuce and herbs all winter, can better and more varieties, I hope I can cut out the little splurges – artichokes from the store are very pricey but sometimes, just gotta have um!
    We haven’t eaten a store bought (or boxed mix) cake in this house in years, we dont drink soda (except the occasional Diet Coke), We buy in bulk what we can ( flour, rice, sugar etc) all so I can justify staying home and playing in the dirt and with my ponies!

    hope that helps – really you have to make choices. Mine is to stay home and to be with my kidlets so I do what I can to make it happen.

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