Anyone study?

This topic contains 36 replies, has 27 voices, and was last updated by  Hillbluffer 6 years, 11 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 37 total)
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  • #54059

    IceFire
    Moderator

    My husband and I used to take Tai Chi classes, but then my college class scedule interfered with the Tai Chi class schedule, and we never got back to it.

    #54060

    Shelli
    Member

    Does Tae Bo count? :blush:

    #54061

    Austeria
    Member

    My ex and I used to own a Ryokukai dojo. We were both instructors, but he was also a class A referee. I also taught bodybuilding.

    #54062

    roolu
    Member

    Shelli, I’d say yes because it’s a form of kickboxing although mostly exercises, it is self-defense.

    Austeria, I humbly bow before you! LOL! :thumbup:

    #54063

    BM59_Fan
    Member

    I have been studying Tang Soo Do since before highschool (Class of ’71), I currently hold a 4th Degree Black Belt in that. My instructor has been John Santiago my life long friend and mentor.

    Began study in the Santi Style of Toyama Ryu Batto Jitsu and Itashikata Funzento Kobushi Jujitsu (Lit: Path of the Wrathful Fist) in 1974 when I became a 1st Degree Black Belt in Tang Soo Do. I hold 4th Degree Black Belts in the Santi Style of the Toyama Ryu and Itashikata Funzento Kobushi Jujitsu. Integral to the Jujitsu style is the study of the Jo is a “walking stick” style commonly used by Shinto Priests – Ranagi Shinto Jojitsu.

    The Toyama Ryu Batto Jitsu is basically a study into all things bladed and sharp – Katana, Wakizashi, Tanto, Naginata, and Yari.

    I have studied in the Wu style of Tai Chi Chuan. I was privileged to have been able to study Arnis/Escrima under Daniel Inosanto during my enlistment in the USN when I was stationed near his school in San Jose California. I am a archer, a discipline that comes very natural to me.

    I like the bardiche as a pole type weapon and practice with one in place of a naginata.

    The ability to grasp it near the head of the blade gives it a close quarter capability some other staff weapons do not have.

    #54064

    elisha54
    Member

    I am currently studying in a system that is a mixture of styles. I’m learning my last TKD form and then will be moving into a more Shaolin style after that. I’ve studied weapons and also Tai Chi. Tai Chi is great and is really a great softer style of martial arts if you study it that way.

    #54065

    I occasionally dabble in Pencak Silat Pertempuran (google it, the founder is a Web Designer for Wycliffe Bible Translators so the website’s fairly good). I’ve also messed around with a bit of Kung Fu, some Tang Soo Do, some Karate, some Brazilian Jujitsu, some Krav Maga and some other stuff. Notice I say dabble? S’why it says student on my forum handle and not Uber High Muckety Muck. I’m always looking for new things to try.

    #54066

    buckshotth
    Member

    i train 4 to 6 times a week in mma which consist of muia thai,bjj and boxing also some ju kite jujitsu thrown in there

    #54067

    frozenfox
    Member

    I have been training in Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu for about four years. While I know the school gets a lot of flack especially from the mma jujitsu crowd, I was lucky enough to be under a teacher who is modest and actually travels to train in Japan at least once a year. Like any martial art there are your wackos and “Sensai” types who power trip, I have not had that experience. Before that I trained in JKD/Wing Chun, Silat and Aikido. I think training in any art, you have to take what works and be wary of having any favored movement over another.

    #54068

    WOW very impressive, a ton of experience between all of you. Is there an art that a person with a artificial hip might consider?.

    Dirk

    #54069

    okie B
    Member

    Pottery.

    Just kidding…my sense of humor is freakishly warped tonight.

    Okay, all seriousness now. I am not experienced in any of these, and I am in awe of all these people who do them. I know there’s been some mention of Tai Chi in the thread, and I have done that some, but not studied it extensively. With a good instructor who truly pays attention to you and how your body moves, I would think Tai Chi would be a good option. I have a degenerative hip, and I had no problem with it. The only thing I can think of that might cause a problem was when we did some of the exercises sitting on the floor, but our instructor was awesome about making sure each of were situated in a way that our bodies could comfortably accommodate. We actually ended up taking the class on the recommendation of a yoga instructor at the same place who is a professor of kinesiology and not just one of those feel the burn kind of instructors that hurt you more than help you. Long story made even longer — I would try it and see how it feels for you.

    #54070

    kilogulf59
    Member

    @dirk Williams wrote:

    WOW very impressive, a ton of experience between all of you. Is there an art that a person with a artificial hip might consider?.

    Dirk

    You may find a good instructor who can help you but, in general, no. My health isn’t so good anymore…my current MA is the art of the gun…

    #54071

    frozenfox
    Member

    I agree with kilogulf59 in that you may not be able to take part in more fighting type martial arts. Martial arts is about being aware of what your body is capable of in relation to an opponent(s) and using those tools. I agree with trying Tai Chi and paying attention to how your body feels from there.

    For me I think the true test of a martial art is the ability to do it even when you get older, most of us eventually have health problems, some sooner than later. I think a lot of current martial art sports get trained in while the student is in their prime so to speak because they use muscle. Like any sport the athlete can only do it so long as they have health and age on their side with rare exceptions, then they either retire or become coaches for the fresh meat.

    ymmv

    #54072

    roolu
    Member

    I agree with Forzenfox completely, Tai Chi would be worth trying but you have to listen to your body. If you are not able to do that, then investigate various weapons. You don’t have to kick or spin to handle a weapon well enough to defend yourself. With a bo staff, you use your arms most of the time and the movements are mostly just walking normally. If you learn that well enough, then make yourself a nice tall walking stick (any hard wood straight branch would do) that can double as your staff.

    #54073

    POTTERY, LOL!, sound very dangerous to me.Still carry a good fighting folder daily just in case. Benchmade ATS34 Tanto “Emerson”

    I see the local college has a Tia Chi class 4 times a year, might be fun.

    Thanks guys
    Dirk Williams

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