Baking your own bread

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 58 total)
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  • #55107
    D_Loki
    Participant

    Here is a link to a variety of alternative cooking methods with plans and advice. The second link is plans for an outdoor Adobe wood burning oven project. I hear the BEST breads are baked in wood-burning ovens.

    D_Loki

    The Prepper’s Librarian

    http://peaceandcarrots.homestead.com/Thermoscookinglinks.html” onclick=”window.open(this.href);return false

    http://hotfile.com/dl/22835894/669a970/Project-Adobe_Oven.doc.html

    #55108
    D_Loki
    Participant

    I decided to include the referring page for the solar oven link since there is a treasure trove of info there.

    D_Loki

    http://peaceandcarrots.homestead.com/ourfavoritelinks.html” onclick=”window.open(this.href);return false

    #55109
    edea1976
    Member

    My father-in-kaw has plans for a cardboard solar oven but is thinking of making it out of sturdier materials. If his modifications work I’ll try talking him into making me one. I wonder how long a load of bead would take?

    #55110

    Lol!
    Up here in Washington?
    About six months….

    #55111
    IceFire
    Moderator

    I have (or should say had) a recipe for “Sheepherder’s Bread” that can be made in a cast iron dutch oven. I’ll post it once my daughter sends it back to me. She absconded with SEVERAL of my recipes, without my knowledge…found out I was missing several when I went to make the recipe books for all the girls. She was told to write down the recipes in her book, and then send them back to me. So, as soon as I get them, I’ll put it up

    #55112
    Vina8
    Member

    We also have fresh bread everyday, and it is the best I have ever eaten. For round loaves DH uses a small cast iron, enamel coated dutch oven. He also makes WONDERFUL French bread. We were without an oven for a week or two for repairs and found that the gas grill worked very well. We are now grinding our own grains and experimenting with various kinds (flax, buckwheat, graham, whole wheat, rye, etc.) We still haven’t had a bad loaf. I am so happy he became obsessive about bread making!

    #55113
    ponymama44
    Member

    Mountain Mama – what kind of grain mill do you have? we are interested in a hand crank model and are wondering what works and what doesn’t.

    #55114
    Vina8
    Member

    We just purchased a Family Grain Mill. It is electric with hand crank back-up. It takes 10 to 15 minutes using the electric motor to grind 5 cups of flour. We haven’t tried the crank yet, but we have read online that it takes at least an hour of cranking to grind enough flour for a loaf. That had been our experience with another grinder we had bought 30 years ago that used stone. This one uses burrs to grind. It is supposed to be useful for grinding a lot of stuff other than just wheat. For practical, daily use we decided we needed an electric one, but wanted the hand crank as a backup in the event we end up with no power. Walton Feed has some good information about grinders: http://waltonfeed.com/blog/showCategory/category_id/82″ onclick=”window.open(this.href);return false

    I hope this helps, ponymama. I have learned so much from you, I am glad you asked.

    #55115
    ponymama44
    Member

    Thanks for the info – it is amazing what just talking has enlightened in all of us. The idea of having grains on hand has been achieved but I never really thought about how I was going to prepare them ( can you see me with morter and pestle grinding for days for a single loaf of bread – hahahahah kinda tragic really)

    Icefire has been using the kitchen aid attachement – I wonder how well that works and if one could convert it with ingenuity to cranking?

    #55116
    IceFire
    Moderator

    I’ve been trying to figure out a way to rig up my mixer to work without electricity, especially since I have all of my pasta-making and meat grinding/fruit and vegetable straining attachments for it, as well as the grain grinder. (I use it more for everything ELSE than I do for mixing! I’d like to find some sort of method for adapting it to cranking for it, but so far haven’t found anything. (of course, I AM also have actual hand-crank grinders (small ones) but havent found hand-crank pasta makers, or gotten a good strainer for the fruits/veggies as of yet.

    #55117
    IceFire
    Moderator

    Well, last night my husband asked me to make some Asiago cheese bread today. Used up the last of the dough on that loaf, then made up a new batch of sourdough asiago. Got four 2-gallon buckets from the bakery department of a grocery store here (25 cents per bucket/lid, for a whopping 1 dollar for all four) so now I can make several different types of bread dough, and have them on hand.

    #55118
    Donna
    Member

    @IceFire wrote:

    I’ve been trying to figure out a way to rig up my mixer to work without electricity, especially since I have all of my pasta-making and meat grinding/fruit and vegetable straining attachments for it, as well as the grain grinder. (I use it more for everything ELSE than I do for mixing! I’d like to find some sort of method for adapting it to cranking for it, but so far haven’t found anything. (of course, I AM also have actual hand-crank grinders (small ones) but havent found hand-crank pasta makers, or gotten a good strainer for the fruits/veggies as of yet.

    I know this is an old post and you may have already found an answer, but might I inquire as to what the brand of your mixer is? Sounds like it does a LOT! Depending up on the brand, I may have some ideas…. 🙂

    #55119
    okie B
    Member

    Are you talking about IceFire? She is the Kitchen Aid stand mixer queen. I wish I had the grain grinder for mine…

    We just have a Back to Basics grain mill. It was inexpensive, and that was the only way I was able to convince hubby that we should get it. Of course, it sat in the cupboard for nearly ten years before we actually used it for the first time! But when we did, it works just fine. It may not be the most durable grinder out there, but it’ll do for now. At least until I can convince the hubby to upgrade…

    #55120
    Donna
    Member

    Ah-ha…got it.
    Yep the Family Grain Mill makes one for the Kitchen Aide….

    Hey there is nothing wrong with the Back to Basics…for a budget mill, you’re right it does the job quite well.

    Thanks!

    #55121
    tigger2
    Member

    Biscuits are bread and I can make some killer cat head biscuits. Most are 5 inches across and close to 2 inches high.

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