Canning Butter

This topic contains 57 replies, has 23 voices, and was last updated by  ReadyMom 8 years, 5 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 58 total)
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  • #607

    mmpaints
    Member

    If companies such as Red Feather can sell canned butter, than why is it when we can it at home it’s not safe? There’s plenty of information on the web concerning the pro’s and cons of canning butter. I am here to tell you that I am currently eating butter out of a jar that’s been on a shelf in my pantry for a year and I’m still alive.

    This is how I can butter………..
    I preheat my oven to 250 degrees and then place my jars in the oven for 30 minutes. I heat my rings and lids per any canning project on the stove in boiling water. While the jars are heating, I melt my butter over a medium heat and stir it pretty much constantly so it doesn’t scorch. By the time the jars are ready, the butter is melted and hot. I use my canning funnel to pour the butter into the 1/2 pint jars, keeping the butter stirred well so the butterfats don’t seperate out. I leave roughly 1/2″ head space so I can shake the jar contents to keep the fats mixed in while the butter is cooling. Carefully wipe the tops of the jars off to ensure a good seal and place your lids and rings on snug. I place my lidded jars on a kitchen towel to cool until the lids ping. Once the lids ping, I shake up each jar every few minutes to keep the fats mixed well as the butter cools. I continue to shake them up until the butter no longer seperates. The jars will still be warm. Once the butter stops seperating, I place them in the fridge to cool down completely. Once they are cold, I set them in the pantry for storage. If kept in a cool, dark spot, butter can and does keep in jars for up to 5 years.

    #55302

    Wm_Lankes
    Member

    Cool article…I wish I had time to do this….

    #55303

    Phelan
    Member

    Thank you. I can milk without issue.

    Have you done flavored butters? I make and freeze a lot of it, but would the flavor hold canned?

    #55304

    ponymama44
    Member

    Thanks for the info. My jersey Buttercup produces so much milk with high butterfat content I have been freezing but I prefer to can. I will try today or tomorrow when I make my next batch of butter.

    #55305

    mmpaints
    Member

    oh, I’m big jealous now. I so want a jersey. I was making cheese with the milk from my neighbors’ brown swiss but they wore out their friendship with me pretty quick and I won’t make and give them cheese anymore.

    #55306

    ponymama44
    Member

    I love my girl – she is a cross with a holstein – she has the body type and udder as well as gentleness of the jersy but the spots of the hostein. this is her first freshening so I had to teach about the stancion, milking, walking on a leash, etc. she has been great. i highly recommend a jersey as a family cow!

    #55307

    idahobob
    Member

    @mmpaints wrote:

    If companies such as Red Feather can sell canned butter, than why is it when we can it at home it’s not safe? There’s plenty of information on the web concerning the pro’s and cons of canning butter. I am here to tell you that I am currently eating butter out of a jar that’s been on a shelf in my pantry for a year and I’m still alive.

    This is how I can butter………..
    I preheat my oven to 250 degrees and then place my jars in the oven for 30 minutes. I heat my rings and lids per any canning project on the stove in boiling water. While the jars are heating, I melt my butter over a medium heat and stir it pretty much constantly so it doesn’t scorch. By the time the jars are ready, the butter is melted and hot. I use my canning funnel to pour the butter into the 1/2 pint jars, keeping the butter stirred well so the butterfats don’t seperate out. I leave roughly 1/2″ head space so I can shake the jar contents to keep the fats mixed in while the butter is cooling. Carefully wipe the tops of the jars off to ensure a good seal and place your lids and rings on snug. I place my lidded jars on a kitchen towel to cool until the lids ping. Once the lids ping, I shake up each jar every few minutes to keep the fats mixed well as the butter cools. I continue to shake them up until the butter no longer seperates. The jars will still be warm. Once the butter stops seperating, I place them in the fridge to cool down completely. Once they are cold, I set them in the pantry for storage. If kept in a cool, dark spot, butter can and does keep in jars for up to 5 years.

    That’s the way we do it. I think that it tastes a whole lot better after it has been canned and set for awhile (at least 3 months)

    Right now I’ve got 24lbs of the stuff out in one of the freezers a waitin’ to be canned and put into storage. 😀

    Bob
    III

    #55308

    Ldychef2k
    Member

    Could you put solid butter in the jars and then put them in the oven? That would eliminate the stirring of the melted butter on the stove top. I am really interested in doing this, so am curious.

    #55309

    ponymama44
    Member

    I have an inquiring mind and wnat to know if anyone has canned home made butter AND store bought and if they act differently. Also – Have you canned unsalted as well as salted – has anyone clarified their butter before you can it??

    I know a zillion ?’s but I make my own butter and really dont want to waste any by screwing up during the process! It takes some effort to make it and it tires me out thinking I might have to throw it away.

    #55310

    I’ve read that unsalted butter doesn’t taste as good after bottling it. And if it’s homemade butter, just be sure to have all moisture out of it, or simmer it a little longer.

    For those who have been scared to bottle it this way (because it isn’t actually ‘canned’) a new canning book I bought has a recipe for actually canning it. She melts and simmers the butter for 10 minutes. Then she says to water bath it for 60 minutes. She also has directions to water bath and pressure can milk.

    I’ve done butter the way MM suggests and had no problems! I just did anothe 5 pounds yesterday!

    #55311

    mmpaints
    Member

    I do my home made butter the same way as lightly salted store bought and it comes out the same. Clarified butter is without the butterfat? The trick to this is to keep the butterfats mixed. you must shake it all to keep it stirred until it stops seperating or this does not work. Even with the water bath method, you still have to shake the jars as they cool to mix the butterfats back in. That’s why you keep the melted butter stirred well or you’ll not get even distribution of the butterfats when you go to pour it into the jars.

    #55312

    ponymama44
    Member

    ok – gonna try

    #55313

    Ldychef2k
    Member

    Well, I tried it. Canned 9 pints today. Put the jars in the oven, melted and stirred 8 pounds of butter, filled the pints to just over an inch from the top, which may have been too much, and they all pinged, they blended well with shaking, and we will see what happens now ! I only paid $1.88 a pound for the butter before Christmas, and it was frozen until today. I hope it works !

    #55314

    mmpaints
    Member

    It did. You’re good to go/

    #55315

    edea1976
    Member

    You are all so inspiring. I’m going to start canning some butter for my shelves. Thanks everyone for this great thread!

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