CANNING FOODS – a lost art

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 45 total)
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  • #55709
    howison
    Member

    Alaska Rose thank you for sharing your knowledge it is very much appreciated. I was wondering what brand of pressure canner do you use.

    #55710
    MTJoe
    Member

    Great article, I have just got the green light from the state to go after five more one tail deer, and will want to can the meat, I am out of freezer space! I have a brand new pressure canner never used as the wife is scared of it, so it will become my domain. Add to that, I know what is in the meat, and where it came from, not like meat in a can from the store, I have ate enough of that to know I will have to backslide A LOT! It will be just like the military barracks around my place before I HAVE to eat it!

    #55711
    xdewit
    Member

    @MTJoe wrote:

    Great article, I have just got the green light from the state to go after five more one tail deer, and will want to can the meat, I am out of freezer space! I have a brand new pressure canner never used as the wife is scared of it, so it will become my domain. Add to that, I know what is in the meat, and where it came from, not like meat in a can from the store, I have ate enough of that to know I will have to backslide A LOT! It will be just like the military barracks around my place before I HAVE to eat it!

    Sorry for my lack of understanding dued to my knowlegde of English: you have ate enough of the canned deer from the shop to know that you will eat this only when you dont have anything else to eat?

    As far as I know it is very tasteful to have your own meat canned! Perhaps a ‘rillette’ a french type of meat canning. I know a guy who has ‘very special’ (?) kind of turkiyes and makes A LOT of money selling those in all kind of flavors and so on farmers markets (saucises, rillettes etc).
    Hope this helps.
    Have fun hunting!
    Xant

    #55712
    xdewit
    Member

    here they mention rillettes with other animals but you can always give it a try?
    http://justcookit.blogspot.com/2008/11/home-charcuterie-part-one-making.html” onclick=”window.open(this.href);return false

    #55713
    ReadyMom
    Moderator

    Thank you ALaska Rose! I am particurlary interested in the canning of meat. I’ve been doing it for the past couple of years (per the Blue book), but am still nervous (so still haven’t eaten any 😳 ). I’ll be looking forward to your posts. If possible, maybe we could break down the threads into seperate areas (since I’ve noticed canning gets pretty lenghty threads on other forums:

    Home Canning: Water Bath,
    Home Canning: Meats,
    Home Canning: General,
    Home Canning: Equipment,
    Home Canning: Recipes
    (Or something like that). -k

    #55714
    xdewit
    Member

    http://wibowhunters.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=processing&action=display&thread=289″ onclick=”window.open(this.href);return false

    lots of pages on canning deer meat. You are in for some fun!
    Xant
    ps if you become a rich and famous brand of up scale canned deer meat, please think of us sometimes;)) HAHAHAHAA

    #55715
    MTJoe
    Member

    Oh, no, I eat wild game daily! I wont eat store bought canned meat, with all the stuff the inject into the food supply, I will take alfalfa and weat fed deer all day!

    #55716
    Alaska Rose
    Participant

    Okay, if someone will teach me how to start a new thread, or start one in each of those catagories, I will then post directions in the correct one? My canner is an American, I believe, although the label is not clear any more, it gets a lot of use. Sam’s Club here in Fairbanks has them for sale. Maybe they do in other areas, also.
    BARE BONES BASIC MEAT CANNING: You can just raw pack the meat, trimmed and cut into cubes, with a smidgeon of salt per jar, no water added, leave about an inch of empty space at the top of the jjar, wipe the rim of the jar well, and make sure no nicks or cracks, put the lid on firmly but not tightly. Make sure the rack is in the bottom of the canner, and about 2 inches of water, cold water if you are doing raw pack meat. Place the lid on, and gently tighten all the toggles around the lid, doing the 2 opposing ones only to touching, all the way around the lid, then gently tighten 2 at a time, opposite each other, so you are applying even pressure on the lid all the way around. These canners ar emade of aluminum and it is soft. The lid has an arrow on it that needs to be pointed at a mark on the side, every time, as the lid will seat correctly doing this. Bring the canner to a boil, letting the steam exhaust for about 10 minutes through the open petcock valve. Then flip it down, so pressure will start to build in the canner, watch the gauge. When it reaches 10 pounds pressure at sea level, you will have to adjust for higher elevations, then you turn the heat down to maintain that pressure, neither rising nor falling, for 1 hour, 30 minutes for pint jars. When the time is up, turn off the heat and let the pressure drop by itself, do not open or raise the petcock until the gauge is at zero. Carefully open the lid, and remove the jars, to a draft free area until cool. I cover mine with a large towel. Empty and clean the canner.

    #55717
    Alaska Rose
    Participant

    ^That is the usual way most folks used to can meat. It can be used as any cooked meat, when the jar is opened. HOWEVER, there are so many other ways to can meat, you will seldom do this, after you get going on it.
    I can meat patties, made from hamburger, or sausage, or browned burger, canned dry pack, to use as any browned burger in any recipe. A pint is about a pound of browned burger. Meatballs can be cooked and either dry packed hot or canned in any sauce you choose. Try not to use to heavy a gravy in home canned meats, the starch can slow the amount of heat reaching the center of the jar for the required amount of time needed. Mini meatloaves in light brown gravy are delicious. Sliced roasted turkey or any roasted meat in light gravy or au jjus is very nice. Want a tender French Dip sandwich? Open a jar of sliced roast beef or venison in au jus, heat place on a roll and dip.

    #55718
    ReadyMom
    Moderator

    @Alaska Rose wrote:

    Okay, if someone will teach me how to start a new thread, or start one in each of those catagories, I will then post directions in the correct one?

    Admin … should we post the separate categories under this ‘Food Storage Tips & Recipes’ thread? Or could we have a separate ‘Canning’ topic (under ‘Preparedness Discussion‘) where it can all stay together, since there are so many separate categories? -k

    #55719
    Alaska Rose
    Participant

    Hi,
    I finally have more information on the type of canner I use. It is an All-American Pressure Cooker, made by Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry, Inc. in Manitowoc, Wisconsin 54220. At least that is where they were located waaaay back when I got mine. Hope this helps.

    #55720
    IceFire
    Moderator

    Lucky you, Rose! All-Americans are great! Unfortunately, they are so darned expensive, I can’t afford one, so just have to keep using my Presto. At least I was able to find replacement gaskets for it.

    #55721
    howison
    Member

    Thanks for the info Alaska Rose. That was the brand I have been looking at recently, now to convince the wife.

    #55722
    birdgirl1
    Member

    Hi everyone! i used to do some canning, but only open kettle with peaches, pears and jam. I bought a canner 22 (!) years ago, moved and then never worked up the courgage to use it—afraid of a pressure canner. now we have a smooth top range which i can’t afford to replace and can’t can on, and also no way to have a gas range :-(. My lucky sister had a propane burner made that she cans on in her summer kitchen some 1500 miles away. Does anyone know of a purchasable apparatus reliable enough to can on? Something NOT as expensive as a new range! My sister-in-law told me gas is much better for pressure canning because the heat is constant, unlike electric. Thanks for all the info on this site. Looking forward to your answers. birdgirl+1

    #55723
    IceFire
    Moderator

    Birdgirl,

    I have a ceramic-top range, and I can on it all the time with no problems. (I also cook with my cast iron on it all the time.) You just have to be careful not to smack the canner down on the cooktop surface…place it gently on the cooktop. If you are careful, you shold be able to can on your ceramic-top range, too.

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