Canning soup that contains pasta products

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This topic contains 3 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  justme_noname 2 weeks, 2 days ago.

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  • #66163

    justme_noname
    Participant

    I know it is said that canning with pasta and a few other things is not safe. What I’m trying to do is make a couple soups like I buy in the store and they contain pasta. One is tomato rotini but I have a couple others as well. Since the canned soup I buy in the store has pasta in it, there is a way to do this right? Basically, I’m trying to get it to where I can make my own canned soup, open a jar, pour it out into a pan, heat it up and then eat it like I do store bought soup.

    Is this doable? Is there some secret to this? Has anyone else done this with success and willing to share how they did it?

    #66165

    dmwalsh568
    Participant

    You might be able to do it with a pressure canner, but don’t try to can in a water bath since it’s dangerous for anything with a pH of over 4.5 – you can get botulism from the results….

    Did find a recipe for pressure canning soup, but you can’t add pasta ahead of time.

    From https://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_04/soups.html

    Vegetable, dried bean or pea, meat, poultry, or seafood soups can be canned. These directions are intended for use with ingredients that already have separate canning recommendations for those foods.

    Caution: Do not add noodles or other pasta, rice, flour, cream, milk or other thickening agents to home canned soups. If dried beans or peas are used, they must be fully rehydrated first.

    Please read Using Pressure Canners before beginning. If this is your first time canning, it is recommended that you read Principles of Home Canning.

    Procedure: Select, wash, and prepare vegetables, meat and seafoods as described for the specific foods in their own canning instructions. Cover meat with water and cook until tender. Cool meat and remove bones. Cook vegetables as described for a hot pack. For each cup of dried beans or peas, add 3 cups of water, boil 2 minutes, remove from heat, soak 1 hour, and heat to boil; drain.

    Combine solid ingredients with meat broth, tomatoes, or water to cover. Boil 5 minutes.

    Caution: Do not thicken. Salt to taste, if desired. Fill jars halfway with solid mixture. Add remaining liquid, leaving 1-inch headspace.

    more at https://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_04/soups.html

    #66166

    dmwalsh568
    Participant

    Forgot to mention that commercially prepared soups are cooked in a retort that can get much higher temperatures and pressures than we can at home even with a pressure canner. I’d be leery of any recipe for a soup that didn’t follow the USDA guidelines since botulism is no joke even with modern medicine…with limited medical support during an event it could be worth your life if you get it wrong.

    #66167

    justme_noname
    Participant

    So they use a different method to “can” canned soup than we do. I guess I’m going to have to use the freeze method instead. I haven’t read anything about not being able to freeze soups with pasta in it, yet anyway. I’ll research that a bit.

    Thanks.

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