Dehydrating

Viewing 15 posts - 136 through 150 (of 237 total)
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  • #56532
    watcher
    Participant

    Potatoes=
    12.5 pounds store weight = 9 pounds (144 ounces = 24-6 ounce servings) peeled and diced (I used a French fry cutter to slice them in strips), steam blanched with sulfite for 12 minutes (stirring at 4 and 8 minutes), rinsed it cold water and dehydrated at 120 degrees = 25.25 ounces dried weight = 24 – 1 1/16 ounce servings (last serving just a little smaller) or call it 20 – 1 1/8 ounce servings with a little extra
    25.25 ounces just fits in a ½ gallon mason jar

    #56533
    tigger2
    Member

    Oak,
    I used a 5 pound very lean beef roast. It was huge. I bought a device that pumps hamburger out in various shapes to make jerky out of. The shapes are round and flat. Either way looks too much like turds. I quit using it and started buying lean beef roasts. The main thing is to try to make the slices the same thickness. That way they will be done at close to the same time.

    #56534
    Alaska Rose
    Participant

    If you want the texture and flavor of regular jerky or smoked fish without worrying about any disease, dry it first, then put it up to temperature in your oven and hold a bit to make sure it reaches that temperature inside the pieces. I would recommend this with fish and turkey or chicken. I make salmon strips this way, since I like the traditional texture and flavor of the dried smoked fish but wihout worry about worms or any other parasites in the fish.

    #56535
    Alaska Rose
    Participant

    Also, if you partially freeze the very lean roast, then slice it, you will have better luck on thin even slices. Even more so, if you run it through a meat slicer after partially frozen.

    #56536
    watcher
    Participant

    Peaches
    1 #10 can (106 ounces) peaches = 24 (1/2 cup) servings wet weight = 10 3/8 ounces dry weight = 20 servings, ½ ounce per serving

    2 #10 cans fills a ½ gallon mason jar

    #56537
    watcher
    Participant

    Carrots
    16 pounds store weight = 12 pounds peeled, trimmed and coined, steam blanched with sulfite 9 minutes (stirred at 3 and 6 minutes) and dehydrated at 120 degrees = 48 – 4 ounce servings wet weight = 24 ounces dried weight = 48 – ½ ounces serving

    24 ounces fills a ½ gallon mason jar

    #56538
    watcher
    Participant

    Green Beans
    17 pounds frozen green beans (store weight) = 72 (4 ounce) servings = 24.5 ounces dehydrated = 66 (3/8 ounce) servings

    12 ounces per ½ gallon mason jar

    #56539
    watcher
    Participant

    Tomato Sauce
    1 #10 can (105 ounces) tomato sauce = 24 (1/2 cup) servings wet weight = 10 1/8 ounces dry weight = 20 servings, ½ ounce per serving

    12 ounces fills a pint mason jar

    Reconstitution is 2 parts water to 1 part powder for paste, 4 to 1 for sauce and 6 to 1 for juice

    #56540
    watcher
    Participant

    Peas

    9 pounds store weight frozen peas = 36 (4 ounce) servings = 32 1/2 ounces dry weight = 30 (1 ounce) servings
    32 ½ ounces fills a ½ gallon mason jar

    Extra note: You may have noticed I store a lot of my dehydrated stuff in 1/2 gallon mason jars. I intend reuse them for more storage in a after TSHTF situation, however without electricity how am I going to seal them you ask (1/2 gallon mason jars should NOT be used for pressure canning, there is no data on times or pressures except with very limited products). The answer is I will use a hand vacuum pump from Harbor Frieght http://www.harborfreight.com/brake-bleeder-and-vacuum-pump-kit-92474.html and a little adaptation to vac pack the jars.

    #56541
    Ronin4hire
    Member

    Curious about making tomato powder- would it help to use tomato PASTE instead? or puree?
    Seems that the thicker product would dry faster, as long as its spread THIN on the trays…

    #56542
    Vina8
    Member

    @Ronin4hire wrote:

    Curious about making tomato powder- would it help to use tomato PASTE instead? or puree?
    Seems that the thicker product would dry faster, as long as its spread THIN on the trays…

    I would use the tomato paste. It is already thickened with a lot of the water removed. Experiment and see if it turns out to be what you want. I would try it before I filled nine trays with paste. My guess is that you will end up with something more like a leather than powder. If you dry it long enough then put it in a food processor, you might end up with a powder. Obviously, I am not talking from experience. :crazy: Hopefully, someone else here has actually made tomato powder.

    #56543
    watcher
    Participant

    I suppose you could use paste but the #10 cans of sauce are cheap at Sams. To powder it I used a small spice/coffee grinder set on the next to finest setting.

    #56544
    paladin
    Member

    @Ronin4hire wrote:

    Curious about making tomato powder- would it help to use tomato PASTE instead? or puree?
    Seems that the thicker product would dry faster, as long as its spread THIN on the trays…

    You can buy powdered tomato paste…. I dont think it is worth the effort…. I dry my tomatoes, but have stocked up on dry tomato paste… check with sams, or EE..

    MNB

    #56545
    Tinga
    Participant

    UGH. Tomato paste. Dehydrating this stuff is tough. Even after you dehydrate it, it still clumps. I had dried a can or two, cracked it up and was running it through a coffee grinder. It literally LUMPED up around the blades causing the grinder to rock.
    I got it somewhat powdery and now it sits rock hard in a glass jar.

    I’d either buy it, or just store the paste. Dehydrating it was waaaaay to much work to save a little bit of storage

    #56546
    watcher
    Participant

    not dry enough

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