Dehydrating

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 237 total)
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  • #56442
    tigger2
    Member

    Some foods will turn brown if you don’t treat them. I used lemon juice. I used the concentrated lemon juice, about a cup to a gallon of water. I let the veggies soak for an hour. I put a clean, dry towel on the table and put the veggies on it to dry them.

    #56443
    MrDanB
    Participant

    I was going through the garage and found my ex-wifes dehydrator! It was only used a few times 3 years ago. It’s the Nesco brand too… I can’t find the book, but being male, I wouldn’t have read it anyway :whistling: . Thanks for all the tips and tricks on here! I will try the simple stuff first, like apple pieces with cinnamon! As for saving in the mason jars… I know there’s a LDS cannery down the street from me and they sell the absorbers for 8 cents ea. I could just buy a whole bucket of ’em if I “get the bug” and start doing this chronically! I remember the banana chips as being sorta brown, but tasted just fine. I would like to try the fruit leather too. I have a new italian plum tree that should produce some this year and some different berries too. Hmmm maybe I already got bit by the bug…

    #56444
    ReadyMom
    Moderator

    @SurvivalPrepDotNet wrote:

    I just got these videos uploaded last night showing how to dehydrate chicken…although really these same general steps would work for dehydrating and/or jerking other types of meat (DYOD):

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NkvMScLWtZ4

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W19vibwGSo8

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGWSYooCHzo

    SurvivalPrep … you have awsome materials available on your website! I’m posting links to as much as I can on my EmergencyHomePreparation.org site! Good stuff!! 😀

    #56445
    ReadyMom
    Moderator

    Oke … that’s it! I’m convinced. Between watching the YouTube videos by Dehydrate2Store and going to the website, AND reading this thread, I’m getting one! I’ve been home canning meats, so surely I can do this too! I was getting ready to place an order with Honeyville Grains. When I do that, I spend as much as I would on a dehydrator.

    I was looking at the Excalibur, but it’s pricey. After reading about the success some of you are having with the Nesco, I’m going to get that one. Two reasons:

    -I’m Just starting out, and I can always upgrade if I’m successful and want to improve my methods.
    – I have ‘Kohls Cash’ AND a 15% discount coupon! So I can get this one:
    at a good price ($79.99 – 15% = 67.99 – $30 KohlsCash = $37.99) Wooo-hooo, hubby shouldn’t get too upset over that purchase! I’m getting off this computer, putting a load of laundry in, and running to Kohls!

    #56446
    ReadyMom
    Moderator

    Got my Dehydrator! And … it was on SALE! So I got it for about $34 (with all my sales + discount + cash coupons!). Tried apples and oranges yesterday. The apples were soooo yummy. Almost melt-in-your-mouth yummy. I was pleasantly surprised.

    This morning, I watched videos from ‘Dehydrate2Store’ and can’t wait to get started. Weis Markets has frozen veggies on salt 10/$10. I’m going shopping. Our daughter loves peas, but NOT canned peas, which is what I have in my preps. I have 3 #10 cans of peas from Honeyville Grains. Making my own should be a $$ saver.

    Now … 😕 Question: Those who have already done this … what is the taste factor? Of course my kids are picky. Will our daughter like the rehydrated peas? How close do they compare to when I would taken them out of the bag and cook up?

    Since the foods dry so much lighter and smaller, how do you know how much to use to rehydrate as a serving? If you want a total of 1 cup of veggies, after rehydrating, do you start with 1/4 cup of veggie to get that amt.? (I’m guessing, knowing different veggies are a tad different). (I’m also searching on line for an answer to that)

    I’m also thinking that dehydrating and storing my veggies is going to give me TONS MORE preps using much less space! I’ll be storing in my 5gal or 2.5 gal buckets with oxygen absorbers.

    Found this source, if anyone is interested:

    All About Dehydrated Vegetables
    https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/information_center/all_about_dehydrated_vegetables.htm” onclick=”window.open(this.href);return false; -k

    #56447
    Vina8
    Member

    ReadyMom, the article you posted was good and parallels my experience so far. One part dried vegetable to 2 or 3 parts liquid is a pretty good rule of thumb. I have used my dried carrots, green beans, celery, and green pepper in vegetable soup that tasted as good as using fresh vegetables. My husband doesn’t care for the rehydrated green beans by themselves, but I think it may be because I had dried some of the thin French beans. I liked them fine. I was surprised how small carrots, celery, and green peppers get when dried. I don’t really measure. Usually a handful or two of something.

    I also plan on drying a lot more sweet potatoes when they come in season. I dried a few as an experiment, and they tasted great.

    #56448
    ReadyMom
    Moderator

    Went to the store, today, and got 1 lb. bags of frozen peas and corn on sale 10/$10. I got 10 bags of each. I just put 2 trays of peas in. I realized that I need the ‘safety screens’ for my trays and the dehydrator only came with 2 🙁 . Now I have to get the other 3. I’m considering just using the other 3 screens and letting them fall through till I get out again. (Note, I’m not too excited to get started, huh? ) -k

    #56449
    ReadyMom
    Moderator

    I am so excited about the possibilities of dehydrating and the amt. you can store in a smaller space (knowing you have to depend on water to rehydrate!!). So, I was thinking:

    In an emergency you can ‘piggyback’ or alternate the use of your prep stocks. If you open a can of corn you have stored, use the packing water from that can to rehydrate your next meal using the dehydrated corn. Then you won’t need to use as much of your stored water for that purpose. Think that would work? The ideal prepper had layers of preps: various methods of storage: dry, wet, frozen, chilled.

    #56450
    Uvajed
    Member

    @Aloha2U wrote:

    If I am not mistaken, by dehydrating fruits and vege’s you’re actually sealing in the vitamin/mineral content to some extent, not to sure on how much. Dehydrating canned fruits was the easiest for me because there’s really no preparation involved only straining of the syrup and it really tastes good. I have bought fresh asparagus last year and chopped it up and placed it in the freezer for a couple months. I decided to dehydrate the asparagus yesterday and it turned out really good, what I did was blanch the asparagus by steaming it for a few minutes then I noticed how fresh smelling it was as if I just bought it at the grocers then I placed it in the dehydrator, turned out really well!

    I read, canning loses 80%, freezing loses 40% and dehydrating loses 3-5% of nutrients. Hubby is going to get me the Excalibur. I’m Sooooo excited! This summer is going to rock!

    #56451
    Uvajed
    Member

    @SurvivalPrepDotNet wrote:

    20 quarts of dehydrated chicken,

    Can you expand on drying chicken, or meats?

    #56452
    ReadyMom
    Moderator

    Another site with good, quick information:

    How to Dry Fruits and Vegetables
    http://farmgal.tripod.com/Dehydrate.html” onclick=”window.open(this.href);return false;

    Includes:

      Choose Which Drying Method is Right For You
      The Drying Process
      Vegetable Drying Guide
      Fruit Drying Guide
      Fruit Leathers
      Making Jerky
      How to Use Dried Food in Recipes
      Recipes Using Dried Foods
    #56453
    Vina8
    Member

    Great resource, ReadyMom! Thanks for the link.

    #56454
    ReadyMom
    Moderator

    @MountainMama wrote:

    Great resource, ReadyMom! Thanks for the link.

    Welcome! I’ve finished my first batch of peas. Five pounds of frozen peas are now snuggly in a quart sized ziploc bag, till I pack them in my buckets or jar w/ their oxygen absorbers. I tried to rehydrate a spoon full, to see how they ‘bounced’ back’ Here’s photos of my work:

    Welcome! I’ve finished my first batch of peas. Five pounds of frozen peas are now snuggly in a quart sized ziploc bag, till I pack them in my buckets or jar w/ their oxygen absorbers. I tried to rehydrate a spoon full, to see how they ‘bounced’ back’ Here’s photos of my work:[attachment=2:2w6hml02]DSC08093.JPG[/attachment:2w6hml02] [attachment=1:2w6hml02]DSC08095.JPG[/attachment:2w6hml02][attachment=0:2w6hml02]DSC08100.JPG[/attachment:2w6hml02]

    #56455
    Vina8
    Member

    Good job, RM. I haven’t tried peas yet–you have motivated me! I absolutely could not eat canned peas–rather eat the bugs we were talking about on another thread!

    #56456
    ReadyMom
    Moderator

    @MountainMama wrote:

    Good job, RM. I haven’t tried peas yet–you have motivated me! I absolutely could not eat canned peas–rather eat the bugs we were talking about on another thread!

    I’ve done frozen bags of peas and corn, now. After rehydrating, most came back plump. There are some that are still a bit wrinkled. BUT … the taste is there! MUCH better than canned peas. I’ll use canned in soups & stews, but our DD (who loves peas) will NOT eat canned peas (or canned corn either, for that matter). So, I needed another option.

    I’ve got #10 cans of the freeze dried peas from Honeyville as yet another option. I missed the Honeyville sale, this time around because I was giving the dehydrating a try. You should ALWAYS have a back up plan for your back up plan! So, I’ll have canned, dehydrated AND freeze dried.

    I’ll be trying onion soon. I’m waiting till it’s a bit warmer out, again and I’m sure of a rain-free night. I’m going to do them on our back deck because I’ve read the smell can be a bit much. I’m feeling better about my food storage, now, since I’m home-canning meats and now have this other option for veggies. Storing veggies is HEAVY on the shelves and space consuming. I have a multi-tiered option for water, so I should be good on that for the rehydration.

    I dehydrated sliced potatoes, yesterday. When I dehydrated, I did them 2 ways: Used my dehydrator AND put some in my oven at 175 degrees for the afternoon. I did NOT like the oven method. The directions said to pretreat your tray with oil. So, I sprayed the tray. This made the potatoes oily. I’m afraid that the oil is going to reduce my storage time, due to the oil going rancid. Even though I sprayed my dehydrating trays, I think that because there are so many holes in the dehydration tray, there was very very little to get on the potatoes and there was a HUGE difference between the two batches of potatoes. I’m going to try using my dehydrator with NO oil. Then I hydrated a few to see how they turned out. Here are my photos (they almost look like potato chips when you are done!):[attachment=1:2fcom3gd]DSC08109.JPG[/attachment:2fcom3gd]

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