Dehydrating

Viewing 15 posts - 76 through 90 (of 237 total)
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  • #56472
    ReadyMom
    Moderator

    DanB… I dehydrated my apples with the skin on and they were fine. REAL YUMMY!

    The past two weeks I have dehydrated:
    10 lbs of frozen Peas
    10 Lbs of rozen Corn
    10 Lbs of frozen Carrots
    5 lbs of fresh sliced mushrooms

    My plan is to get SMALL free bakery buckets and store in those w/ oxygen absorbers.

    #56473
    Uvajed
    Member

    @MrDanB wrote:

    Well… I just sliced up a half dozen red delicious apples to 1/4″ thick, soaked in ascorbic acid/water, spread out on paper towels and sprinkled with gourmet cinnamon. Fanned them out on the Nesco trays and got her running… This is my first attempt at dehydrating. I read that I should peel the apples first, but I had a run-in with a very sharp peeler at a young age and have since tried to avoid them at all costs (seems they can peel skin and fingernail too!lol) Anyway, hoping to have edible fruit snacks tomorrow morning… :drool:
    Dano

    Do you have a slicer, or do you do the slicing by hand? I’m interested in your opinion of the best method. We’re saving up for the vacuum sealer, etc. Do you think it’s beneficial to buy a slicer that’s more accurate than by hand? We’re trying to do this before the growing season is in full force. I’m so psyched for summer!

    :clap:

    #56474
    Vina8
    Member

    @Uvajed wrote:

    @MrDanB wrote:

    Well… I just sliced up a half dozen red delicious apples to 1/4″ thick, soaked in ascorbic acid/water, spread out on paper towels and sprinkled with gourmet cinnamon. Fanned them out on the Nesco trays and got her running… This is my first attempt at dehydrating. I read that I should peel the apples first, but I had a run-in with a very sharp peeler at a young age and have since tried to avoid them at all costs (seems they can peel skin and fingernail too!lol) Anyway, hoping to have edible fruit snacks tomorrow morning… :drool:
    Dano

    Do you have a slicer, or do you do the slicing by hand? I’m interested in your opinion of the best method. We’re saving up for the vacuum sealer, etc. Do you think it’s beneficial to buy a slicer that’s more accurate than by hand? We’re trying to do this before the growing season is in full force. I’m so psyched for summer!

    :clap:

    I have an apple peeler/corer/slicer which is a necessity for drying very many apples. I also have a mandoline that I use to slice many vegetables like carrots, celery, cucumbers, potatoes, etc. It gives you control of the thickness and even slices and is very fast. I have a special glove I use with it to keep from losing skin! I don’t own an electric slicer and don’t plan on getting one. I really don’t have the space for it and haven’t felt the need.

    #56475
    MrDanB
    Participant

    Well, the apples turned out great! Sorta “leathery” and dry. I can’t believe how much those suckers shrink!! I cut them with a chefs knife and cut the middle/core out when the apples are quartered. I don’t think any machine is required for accuracy. Maybe if you were doing pounds of veggies and fruit on a regular basis, then I could see a chopper of sorts. I think I am going to go for jerky next!

    #56476
    birdgirl1
    Member

    Today on Leon Pattenburg’s article he referenced a book, “Backpacking Gourmet”. I looked it up on Amazon and read the reviews. Those reviewing appeared to be mostly backpackers, but I read with interest that the recipes in this book are largely prepared foods (stews, or lasagnas, or breakfast casseroles, etc) that are prepared and then dehydrated. I am very curious about this, and have not noticed anyone discussing this type prep on our site. Question: does anyone do this kind of dehydrating? What have your results been and, what does everyone think about this?
    birdgirl +1

    #56477
    mr bill
    Member

    I have always dehydrated different foods by themselves and then combined them to make a variety of different dishes. I’m not saying not to try to dehydrate complete meals but it seems like it would be more difficult to dry a combination of different foods due to the different times it takes to dry the various ingredients. For instance if you make up a batch of chili you would have to run the dehydrator to dry meat or sauce or beans (whatever took the longest to dry) and everything else would just have to be in for the duration. I’m not sure how the large companies do it but I think they dehydrate each item and then combine them in a recipe to get the finished meal in a bag or can. I have had pretty good results by combining various dried veggies, pastas and meats for stews. soups and casserole type dishes in quart canning jars and sealing them with Oxygen Absorbers. If you add just the right amount of dehydrated stuff to the jar you can use it to cook the food in by simply adding boiling water to the jar and capping it off till you are ready to eat. One other advantage may be the choice of selections you would have if you did not combine your ingredients to start with. This way you could make your recipes to suit your tastes. I have both mixed foods and individual foods as part of my preps. The pre-mixed stuff is ready to go for quick meals and the separate meats, veggies, pasta, fruits and spices are for more elaborate full meal preparations.

    #56478
    Vina8
    Member

    @birdgirl+1 wrote:

    Today on Leon Pattenburg’s article he referenced a book, “Backpacking Gourmet”. I looked it up on Amazon and read the reviews. Those reviewing appeared to be mostly backpackers, but I read with interest that the recipes in this book are largely prepared foods (stews, or lasagnas, or breakfast casseroles, etc) that are prepared and then dehydrated. I am very curious about this, and have not noticed anyone discussing this type prep on our site. Question: does anyone do this kind of dehydrating? What have your results been and, what does everyone think about this?
    birdgirl +1

    The book “Mix-a-Meal” that we have discussed before has good recipes using a variety of dehydrated or freeze dried food that you are likely to have in your storage and could prepare a meal-in-a-bag that way. I would be concerned about trying to home dry traditionally cooked stuff like lasagna or stew that I had cooked. You have to be very careful about drying anything with fat in it. I really can’t picture trying to dry a block of lasagna or a bowl of stew, but combining the dried ingredients so that all you have to do is add hot water is practical. You can preserve many foods like you mentioned (other than freezing) by canning them–just as Alaska Rose!

    #56479
    Alaska Rose
    Member

    We like what my daughter refers to as “Welfare Cheesesteaks” which she invented, I think. Anyway, it is browned burger, drained and rinsed in hot water to remove as much grease as possible, then add chopped onions, chopped bell peppers and cheese sauce, or nacho cheese sauce. The amounts depend on what we have on hand and how many, but we are using gallon cans of the cheese sauce from Sam’s Club and 5 or 10 pounds of burger at a time, then canning the mixture. Since we don’t have refrigeration that is reliable in the summer, this gives us one more quick and easy meal when we are spending the day cutting, hauling and stzkcing firewood for winter. She and I have 20 cord to cut and stack before next winter and there is still some snow on the ground from this winter, LOL.
    The big companies freeze dry the prepared foods, which is extremely fast and happens all at the same rate of drying. It isn’t like dehydrating and freezedried still takes up almost as much room as fresh.

    #56480
    birdgirl1
    Member

    Alaska Rose, that is an interesting dehydrated combo. Have you seen the Leon Pattenburg book? So far, everyone appears to think dehydrating mixtures of prepared foods is not a good idea. Have you dehydrated any food mixtures other than your daughter’s recipe? What are your thoughts on this issue?
    Birdgirl+1

    #56481
    Alaska Rose
    Member

    No, I haven’t seen that book. I probably posted that in the wrong area, since I don’t dehydrate that, I can it. I was sort of following the post by MountainMama that mentioned my canning. I dehydrate things seperately, then recombine in whatever mixture suits my fancy for that day.

    #56482
    ReadyMom
    Moderator

    I found a site via Wolf’s list of blogs & forums. There is one called ‘Adventures in Self Reliance. I’m really enjoying looking through this blog! It has some good Dehydrating tips. Here are some links for dehydrating:

    Making Banana Chips by Dehydrating Bananas
    http://selfrelianceadventures.blogspot.com/2010/05/making-banana-chips-by-dehydrating.html

    Dehydrating Frozen Broccoli
    http://selfrelianceadventures.blogspot.com/2010/05/dehydrating-frozen-broccoli.html

    Freezing and Dehydrating Corn: Choose Your Own Adventure
    http://selfrelianceadventures.blogspot.com/2009/11/freezing-and-dehydrating-corn-choose.html

    #56483
    birdgirl1
    Member

    Woo Hoo! I did my first dehydrating today. I did cucumber slices. I will use these as a snack with veggie dip. I am wondering???? Could I have lightly salted them first?? I think I read somewhere about someone salting potato slices b/f dehydrating, so wondered if one could do the same with cucumber slices?
    Hoping to do swiss chard, kale and strawberries next :clap:birdgirl+1

    #56484
    ReadyMom
    Moderator

    @birdgirl+1 wrote:

    Woo Hoo! I did my first dehydrating today. I did cucumber slices. I will use these as a snack with veggie dip. I am wondering???? Could I have lightly salted them first?? I think I read somewhere about someone salting potato slices b/f dehydrating, so wondered if one could do the same with cucumber slices?
    Hoping to do swiss chard, kale and strawberries next :clap:birdgirl+1

    Mmmmm.. this sounds yummy. Never thought of that! -K

    #56485
    Alaska Rose
    Member

    Tomato slices shrink up a LOT, but are excellent as chips to eat as is. You can store a lot of tomatoes after they are dried, in a small area.

    #56486
    ReadyMom
    Moderator

    @Alaska Rose wrote:

    Tomato slices shrink up a LOT, but are excellent as chips to eat as is. You can store a lot of tomatoes after they are dried, in a small area.

    Then you can add those chips to soup, right? So that’s a good thing! I like tomatoe in my veggie soup. Storing cans of diced tomato for a long time would be hard. Chips …. eazy smeazie!

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