Dehydrating

Viewing 15 posts - 106 through 120 (of 237 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #56502
    ReadyMom
    Moderator

    @Vina8 wrote:

    I dried a large bag of frozen mixed vegetables including cauliflower and broccoli and a large bag of broccoli. It worked great. As ReadyMom said, no need to thaw first. I have found drying frozen food easy and cheap. I have also dried hash browns without any trouble. However, unless you grow your own potatoes and get a really good deal on them, I priced it out and found that it was quite a bit cheaper (and a LOT less work) to buy dehydrated hash browns in bulk. I will look up where I ordered them from and post it.

    Vina, ‘Amlias’ has 2 lb bags of hash-browns for $1.29/bag . I thought that was a pretty good deal. I found potato dices at:

    Emergency Essentials: $8.95/#10 can/Each #10 Can makes approximately 24 1/2-cup servings.

    Honeyville Grains: $9.99/#10can/Each can contains 1.25 pounds of Dehydrated Hash Brown Potatoes

    #56503
    Vina8
    Member

    @upinak wrote:

    Vina, thanks for that info. My Mom is a bulk food item shopper. So even if I wanted to save money… she goes out and buys more food. The reason I am going to start dehydrating quite a bit as I hate waste and I have it for whatever reason.
    Now I just need to figure out if I should use the food processor to chop this stuff up.

    I have never used the food processor yet to chop food for dehydrating. I use a mandoline slicer for carrots, cucumbers, sliced potatoes, and celery.

    Thanks, ReadyMom.

    #56504
    Alaska Rose
    Participant

    I know a salad shooter works great for uniform thin slices of mushrooms to dry, LOL. I had a large case of mushrooms given to me, no dehydrator, so shot them out onto a clean window screen, and placed it over the heater. They dried so nice and fast. 30 pounds of mushrooms fit into a small container after they were done and feather light.

    #56505
    Cougar
    Member

    I just started reading this thread because I just picked up a dehydrator this week. I will be hitting the farm stand tomorrow and my journey into the world of dehydrating will begin. 😀 I’ll keep you posted on my progress…Oh and the link from the beginning of the thread ROCKS http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QxVpIHre2ao&feature=player_embedded This newbie dehydrator found it very informative.

    #56506
    Cougar
    Member

    So I’m starting with Banana’s my son is 7 so we decided bananas are first up. We are also making strawberry ice cream today. 😀

    #56507
    Ready Nurse
    Member

    Great post on dehydrating. How do you keep it and how long is it good for?

    #56508
    Alaska Rose
    Participant

    If the food is kept dry and in the cool dark place always recommended for food storage, it will keep for many years. Up here, it is usually so dry I don’t have to worry too much about adding oxygen absorbers and dri-bags of silica, but they add years to the storage time.

    #56509
    TheLight
    Member

    Question about dehydrating onions. Are they supposed to get crispy when dry or a bit more leathery? I did a small test batch and they all still seem to be flexible.
    The Ginger dried amazingly well, as did the leeks.

    #56510
    Anonymous
    Member

    Mine are almost crunchy, kinda flexible when they are dryed for the “recommended” time…

    #56511
    paladin
    Member

    Making potato flour today…. I want to be able to cook with anything and everything,,, so I am experimenting….

    I love potato rolls so thought I might as well conquer this feat as well… I conquered the 6 grain muffins and they are DELICIOUS with dates and walnuts…. no need to take a laxative… :rofl:

    so when my taters are dry I will grind into flour and give it a shot…..

    I LOVE TO COOK …………………..

    :clap:

    #56512
    watcher
    Participant

    Bananas – 1 banana a day = 1 fruit serving. 1 medium banana hard dried = 1 ounce. 22 ounces dried bananas will fill a 1/2 gallon mason jar (for vacuum packing purposes)

    Grapes – 1.5 ounces raisins = 1 fruit serving. 1 pound (washed, sorted, stemmed) grapes, hard dehydrated = 3 ounces raisins. 34 ounces raisins will fill a 1/2 gallon mason jar (for vacuum packing purposes).

    #56513
    IRo
    Member

    I am so excited!!!! For my birthday I received the 9 tray Excalibur!!! I am in dehydrating heaven. :clap:

    #56514
    Anonymous
    Member

    @IRo wrote:

    I am so excited!!!! For my birthday I received the 9 tray Excalibur!!! I am in dehydrating heaven. :clap:

    Happy Belated Birthday…

    Thats an awesome present have fun… :clap: :happybday: :happybday: :happybday: :clap:

    #56515
    watcher
    Participant

    14 pounds cabbage (store weight) = 12 pounds, outer leaves removed, cleaned, cored and shredded (preprocessing), processed with steam blanch/sulfite = 14 ounces dried weight, 3/16 ounces is one serving (equivalent to 4 ounces wet) – 14 ounces will fit in a 1/2 gallon mason jar for vacumme packing purposes (if leaves are compressed into very course flakes)

    #56516
    watcher
    Participant

    Correction on cabbage post: the weight is 5/16 ounce dry weight equals one 4 ounce wet weight serving

Viewing 15 posts - 106 through 120 (of 237 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
American Preppers Network Forum