First Aid Kit-Comprehensive List

This topic contains 69 replies, has 44 voices, and was last updated by  ReadyMom 11 months, 4 weeks ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 70 total)
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  • #55959

    D_Loki
    Participant

    VenaSera, Skip the old t-shirt. Stock up on individually wrapped maxi-pads. They are readily available, sterile, highly absorbent, and cheaper than ab-pads. Second good reason, with other women in the house they come in use for OTHER reasons. The t-shirts could be used bandages in a stitch, but the fabric is too flexible and porous for good bandages and not very absorbent for blood stoppage (not to mention they will stick to a wound more than the maxi-pads will).

    #55960

    Wingnut
    Member

    For those with severe allergies (often bees) don’t forget an EPi-Pen or suitable adrenalin injection substitute.

    Also there is a product called QR that is a quick clotting formula available on swabs. It designed for nosebleeds but will work for any cut or wound. If you can’t find QR then keep a styptic pencil on hand for small cuts or scrapes to limit bleeding.

    Don’t forget aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen (even over the counter strengths) thin the blood if taken regularly and can delay clotting in an emergency situation.

    Imodium (loperamide) is an over the counter anti-diarrheal that could be worth it’s weight in gold if you get into a contaminated food/water situation. It comes in a liquid thats good for children. Small children are exponentially more vulnerable to dehydration and electrolyte imbalances from diarrhea than adults are. The Imodium can help, but also remember to keep a small but steady intake of sports drink or clean water if diarrhea becomes a problem.

    For bandages that stick to a wound apply a small amount (thin skim) of STERILE pettroleum jelly to the gauze, bandage, or maxi pad before applying it to the area. Better still is to get your triple antiobiotic as the ointment vs the cream. Ointments have a tendency to create a barrier (which limits stickage) whereas creams are water based and therefore ‘soak’ into the skin and wound, leaving the gauze to stick to the dried blood from the wound.

    #55961

    bubtech
    Member

    One day while traveling with my wife in the car we narrowly avoided a SEVERE accident. The other car was not so lucky. After calling the police etc I went to help. Pulling out my most excellent pre-packaged first aid kit well I felt like a fool. This kit that cost 20 bucks or so was 2 4×4 gause some gloves and bandaids for the most part.. Great for a scrape but not for 3 people with bleeding. I was able to keep people calm and control the worst of it until the EMS go there but I did feel foolish. Shortly thereafter I looked for better kits. This was almost futile to get something reasonable and useful. I was able to find this site (NO AFFILIATION OTHER THAN A CUSTOMER) http://www.practicaltrauma.com/respond.shtml” onclick=”window.open(this.href);return false and bought 2 of these (1 for each car) I also added a couple of “beanie baby” type toys (keeps kids calmer – learned this from the EMS guys, great idea) While it is not the optimal kit it is a great foundation and SO much better than any other kit than I could find. And I’m too lazy to do all the work required to put it together myself.
    B

    #55962

    jackiep35
    Member

    As a former EMT/ambulance medic I can tell you from experience:

    If you are doing CPR the patient will probably not live. Only 1 out of 100,000 CPR patients survive if CPR is started in the first 4 minutes. I have preformed CPR over two dozen times and they all died.

    If the person is in a MVA of motor vehicle accident an Ambulance will be dispatched with fire department and police. Depending on area they will be there in as little as a few minutes to 20 minutes. You will probably not need to do CPR but you will need a blanket to treat for shock, bandages or towels for bleeding and the ability to stabilize a person’s head to keep the airway open and protect the spine. If you need to do CPR in an MVA the patient is probably suffering major internal injuries and will not live.

    Keeping medication in a hot car will zap it of its strength. Beware medication kept in a car could have very little effect.

    In the event of an massive breakdown of the emergency system then you would need a large kit for home. I have a tool box with a B/P cuff and stethoscope. I know how to use it. I suggest people take a first responders course min to learn how to listen for lung sounds and take a BP. Pen and paper for vitals. Pen light. Airway mask with oral airways. Large size gauze pads, cravats, tape and OTC medications. I also have wound wash, butterfly bandages and super glue.

    If something were to happen and I had to play doctor, I do not plan on stitching people up. Superglue and butterfly closures are for that. If you can get a RX of an anti-biotic to keep on hand. Most deep wounds will heal without closure and you can’t close the wound if there is an infection or debris in the wound.

    In my car I have a basic first aid kit for myself to use that I keep in the glove box. Band-Aids, pen light, twisters. In a survival bag that I store in the back of the car with EMT scissors, large dressings, blankets, ect.

    To be honest you can find a lot of useful info in some old red cross books that tell how to make bandages with cravats, move people using blankets and make splints from wood. Also you can find some very good information from old nursing handbooks as well as old doctor’s books from back when doctors made house calls. Herbalist books are also recommended.

    Keep in mind if you are doing survival medicine that means there is either no emergency response system or you are too far isolated to get to a hospital. Think like a doctor or nurse and not like an EMT. First aid is ABC: Airway, Breathing, Circulation.

    In survival medicine you must be the doctor.

    #55963

    kilogulf59
    Member

    Outstanding thread, thank you all.

    Not traveling much I’m not to worried about a portable kit anymore. I need to play catch up on the houses supplies.

    Pardon me if I missed this but one thing I always keep stocked and take with me is stomach/digestive tract medications. There’s nothing worse than stomach trouble or dysentery on the road or at home. It will put you down as fast as a serious wound and can be a killer. Of course, I buy the Walgreen’s store brands, big savings especially when on sale.

    => Walgreens Ultra Strength Antacid Tablets (Tums or Rolaids)
    => Walgreens Soothe Upset Stomach Reliever (Good ole Pepto Bismol)
    => Walgreens Anti-Diarrheal Softgels Caplets (Imodium)

    Here’s some documents that may be of use to you all…Medical, Preparedness, Survival, Weapons Maintenance, and Sundry Texts

    #55964

    jackiep35
    Member

    Just added to the kit a pulse/oximeter. There come down in price and are a great little tool.

    #55965

    Cragar
    Member

    This is a great post. Lots of great ideas in the post. Thanks to all who have posted and included the contents of their first aid kit. As a backpacker and climber I am never with out at least a basic first aid kit, augmented of course based on length of trip, type of trip, and number of people in the party.

    My wife is a marine biologist and an officer in the navy reserves, and works continuously in the field and when she got back from Iraq I worked hard to make sure that she had a well stocked first aid kit in her vehicle that would suit not only her needs, but the needs of the people in her crew. Being in the field and being an officer in the reserves I was confident in her ability to handle any situation that she would be confronted with as long as she had the proper supplies with which to do it. For her first aid kit I wanted something that she could grab and go and transport easily and gave her easy access to everything that she would need at her finger tips. After trying several bags, and obsessing for months and months over her preparedness in the field, I stumbled across a magnificent post from Make Blog (http://blog.makezine.com/archive/2010/03/ultimate_film_set_first_aid_kit.html) and set out to build my wife the ultimate first aid kit. This is by far the best option I have discovered. It allows her to have everything at her disposal. I am however sad to say that this first aid kit is only missing two ingredients. An Epi-Pen or two (she is highly allergic to bees), and a high quality compression bandage for stopping serious bleeding (I have found a few but they are out of stock). When I figure out how to post pics, I will post pics of her kit. But for now I feel comfortable about her being in the field and being prepared to assist her crew in whatever might happen. At least as long as there are no bees around.

    Edited to note: Her first aid kit is much more extensive then the one listed in the post. The tool box is what really got me going and I truly couldn’t be happier with the way in which it manages the various items in the kit. Next up, a kit just as stocked for the boat, that is just as well organized, waterproof, and will even float (hopefully). Any suggestion are greatly appreciated for this task. Again, hopefully pictures will follow soon and then you will get the detailed list of her kit.

    #55966

    @readymom wrote:

    I have a red ‘First Aide’ duffle bag in my vehicle, one in our DD’s vehicle (she’s away at college, so I wanted her prepared), one in my DH’s vehicle (on a smaller scale) and will prepare one for our DS when he drives his own vehicle. This is what I have in my First Aide Duffel Bag:

    ALCOHOL PADS
    ANTIBIOTIC CREAM
    ANTISEPTIC TOWELETTE
    ANTI-ITCH
    ASPIRIN
    BABY TOOTH MEDICINE
    BAKING SODA
    BAND-AIDS-‘Advanced Healing pad
    BAND-AIDS-Finger Size
    BAND-AIDS-Knee Size
    BAND-AIDS-‘Regular”
    BAND-AIDS-‘Spot”
    BANDAGE: Elastic 2″
    BANDAGE: Elastic 3″
    BEE STING EASE
    BELT
    BENADRIL CREAM (Hydrocortisone)
    BUTTTERFLY BANDAIDS
    CAN OPENER
    COLD PACK -Instant
    CLEAN DIAPER CLOTH
    CLEAN MATERIAL
    COLD PACK -‘Snap’
    COLD PACK – For Burns (Cold Wrap)
    COTTON BALLS
    COTTON SWABS
    COUGH DROPS
    EAR Syringe (1)
    GAUZE BANDAGE: 2″
    FLASH LIGHT
    GAUZE BANDAGE: 3″
    GUAZE PADS: Non Stick – 1.5×2″
    GAUZE PADS: 2×2
    GAUZE PADS: 3×3
    GAUZE PADS: Surgical 5×9″
    GROUND BASIL LEAVES
    GROUND GINGER
    GROUND NUTMETG
    HEAT WRAP – Instant
    HYDROGEN PEROXIDE
    ICHTHAMMOL (Black Save)
    INSTANT HEAT PAD
    LIGHT STICK
    MASK: Respirator/Face
    MATCHES
    MEDICINE DISPENSER
    MIRROR (small)
    MOTRIN
    NAIL CLIPPERS
    NEELDE/THREAD
    NO MORE OUCHIES
    ORAL PAIN RELIEF
    PADS: (4) Small
    PADS: (4) Medium
    PADS: (4) Large
    PAIN RELIEF MED. (Adult Ibuprofen
    PAPER TOWELS
    PEN FLASH LIGHT
    PEN/PAD of PAPER/PENCIL
    PEPPERMINT
    PETROLEUM JELLY
    PIERCED EAR SOLUTION
    PLASTIC GLOVES
    PLASTIC RECLOSEABLE BAGS: Sm
    PLASTIC RECLOSEABLE BAGS: Md
    PLASTIC RECLOSEABLE BAGS: Lg
    POISON IVY CREAM
    TAPE: Water Proof -1/2 ” (6)
    Tape: Water Proof -1″ (6)
    SAFETY PINS
    SCISSORS
    SCREWDRIVER-Small
    SICK BAG
    SNAP LIGHT STICK
    SORE THROAT POPS
    SPLINT STICKS: Small (Popsicle)
    SPLINT STICKS: Large (Popsicle)
    SPLINT STICKS: Blue Metal-Lg (2)
    SPLINT STICKS: Blue Metal -Sm (1)
    SPLINTS: (Old Shin Guard)
    SUNSCREEN: 30 spf
    THERMAL RUB
    THERMOMETER STRIP
    TOOTHBRUSHES & TOOTHPASTE
    TRASH BAGS
    TWEEZERS
    VISINE A.C. EYEDROPS
    WARMERS: Hand
    WARMERS: Toe
    WATER
    WET WIPES
    YARN/STRING

    I have this list printed in excel format and placed in a plastic sheet protector for each bag. I check off each item, when I re inventory. I date each sheet upon re inventory. I try to keep just a small travel size of any pain meds because I don’t want to waste due to temp. changes. All my meds are in larger quantities @ home. -k

    Hey ReadyMom, great list! What is the nutmeg,basil and ginger used for?

    #55967

    Ready Nurse
    Member

    This is great!! The trauma kit is very well organized. Do you have splints and/or something to stop bleeding?

    #55968

    ReadyMom
    Moderator

    @Robinsons Treehouse wrote:

    -snip-

    Hey ReadyMom, great list! What is the nutmeg,basil and ginger used for?

    So sorry … I’m just seeing this now! :blush: These are the labels I have on those jars of spices:

    Basil: Tea taken hot stops vomiting and eases stomach cramps. Helpful when applied to snake bites and insect stings. The tea is made 2 tsp. per hot cup of water, once a day.

    Ginger: Made into a tea, it can be used as a decongestant, (like hot mustard plaster, but better because it won’t burn the skin). Just immerse a towel, rag or old shirt in a strong, heated ginger tea and place on chest to loosen chest congestion. It causes heat even after its cooled, though it can be re-rinsed in the warm tea. A milder tea can be drunk for upset stomach and gas.

    Nutmeg: Can settle stomachs, nausea and vomiting. Also can be used as an expectorant. Helps improve appetite and digestion. Good for elping maintain a healthy intestinal tract. In boiling water, it can be used as a deodorizer. Remember to use it sparingly,, don’t over do it.

    #55969

    ReadyMom
    Moderator

    @ready Nurse wrote:

    This is great!! The trauma kit is very well organized. Do you have splints and/or something to stop bleeding?

    RE Splints: Yes …

    SPLINT STICKS: Small (Popsicle)
    SPLINT STICKS: Large (Popsicle)
    SPLINT STICKS: Blue Metal-Lg (2)
    SPLINT STICKS: Blue Metal -Sm (1)
    SPLINTS: (Old Shin Guard)

    RE Bleeding: Yes … but not a blood clot med

    (*these are the ‘feminine pad’ pads)
    PADS: (4) Small
    PADS: (4) Medium
    PADS: (4) Large

    #55970

    some may boo and hiss at this, but one thing I have in my bag (actually kept in a small bag in the fridge ready to be dropped into my bob) is a bottle of penicillin, injectable. As this is a prescription item I use a work around, I get mine from the feed store, no presciption necessary and stronger than the prescription type. Some may object to this method, and I am not advocating it for anyone except myself, but the expiration is for 3 years in the future, and I checked with my doc and my pharmacist both of whom said it was safe for human use.

    #55971

    ReadyMom
    Moderator

    @Robinsons Treehouse wrote:

    some may boo and hiss at this, but one thing I have in my bag (actually kept in a small bag in the fridge ready to be dropped into my bob) is a bottle of penicillin, injectable. As this is a prescription item I use a work around, I get mine from the feed store, no presciption necessary and stronger than the prescription type. Some may object to this method, and I am not advocating it for anyone except myself, but the expiration is for 3 years in the future, and I checked with my doc and my pharmacist both of whom said it was safe for human use.

    Kinda like the fish antibiotics that I ordered on line for the ‘fish’ in my ‘tank’ ….. 8) -k

    #55972

    maerha
    Member

    My DH and I have taken Fish Mox for several infections over the years. It always kills the infection and no adverse side affects, as long as you take it with food. You REALLY need to take it with food! I learned this trick from a friend who spent years as a vet tech.

    #55973

    Anonymous
    Member

    One of the most useful multi-tasker for a first aid kit is missing from all the lists I have seen, Tampons are a Class II Medical Device used for nose bleeds and some penetrating wounds/ gun shots, etc…….

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