Growing food indoors

Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 99 total)
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  • #56915
    readyforshtf
    Member

    I use an inverter off my solar system to power the bulbs.

    #56916
    itsadisaster
    Participant

    are you using LEDs or traditional..? I was gonna post some LED stuff this wkend but just very basic prelim stuff with some links since haven’t tried it yet. Would love to hear more when/if you can share… 🙂

    #56917
    readyforshtf
    Member

    If your talking to me they are traditional bulbs from walmart. They run on a timer from 6am to 6pm. My solar charges the batteries and the inverter runs from the batteries. The bulbs hardly draw any power.

    #56918
    mmpaints
    Participant

    Excellent. Addressing the lighting issue without being dependent on the grid. Well done. Now, rfshtf, how about sharing what size inverter, the light info and info on the battery for others that may wish to use lighting for their plants?

    This is what I’m talking about folks, adapt and overcome. learn to do it without being plugged in to the “system”. Self reliance………

    #56919
    readyforshtf
    Member

    At work right now I’ll try and post some pics later tonight or tomorrow. I have 4 harbor freight 45 watt solar panel kits combined for 180 watts(12 15 watt panels). Currently have 8 deep cycle batteries, 2 400/800 watt & 1 1500/3000 power inverters. The 4 grow bulbs run off of a timer on one of the 400/800 inverters. The fluorescent bulbs pull very little power and the sun is happy to provide more the next day:-) A little side note: The harbor freight panels are great for the price. The charge controllers are junk. The 1500/3000 inverter is a Chicago electric from Harbor Freight and it is junk. It draws to many volts and does not handle the advertised watts. It’s lucky to handle 1000 watts. I bought one 400/800 Schumacher inverter and was so happy with it that I bought a second one. I run all my normal day to day things from the small inverters and just use the big one for medium to heavy loads. When it comes to inverters a good one is worth the money. Another side note: This solar system is not just for the plant growing I just utilize it for the free energy.

    #56920

    helter–I would say that it’s more important to learn how to grow outside, in nature. Growing inside is a great alternative if you’re stuck in an apartment or something like that where you don’t have a yard or even a patio/balcony, but growing outside, if we’re talking in survival terms, is going to benefit you more.

    #56921
    readyforshtf
    Member

    I agree I do that too. In Oklahoma I can’t grow outside in the winter without a green house. The green houses take a beating here from the wind. My idea with the indoor growing is year round greens and if god forbid the SH*T hits the fan I can still be growing food in my basement and nobody would have a clue were still eating good or that I have electricity still. Another tip for everyone is to start buying heritage seeds so you can harvest the seeds for next years planting.

    #56922
    mmpaints
    Participant

    I think what discourages new gardeners the most is poor performance associated with lousy soils. I have a few spots here on my own farm that would discourage even the experienced gardener! Thank God for a compost pile…..

    #56923
    readyforshtf
    Member

    My soil is bad too that’s why I’m using planter boxes.

    #56924
    helter
    Member

    @growlikecrazy wrote:

    helter–I would say that it’s more important to learn how to grow outside, in nature. Growing inside is a great alternative if you’re stuck in an apartment or something like that where you don’t have a yard or even a patio/balcony, but growing outside, if we’re talking in survival terms, is going to benefit you more.

    Agreed, I grow outside every year, the amount depending on how much time I have, indoor is just a curiosity.

    #56925
    mmpaints
    Participant

    Actually, indoor growing is how I get such a jump on everybody else in this are for my harvest. It is also how I have fresh cucumbers all winter long(cuc fetish, gotta have em). There are seasons here that if I did not grow indoors, it wouldnt get my first plant in the ground until June 1st ( normal is april 15th)

    The soil here is crap. a nasty, thick redish brown clay that sticks to everything and does not drain in any way or form. I grow my crops in the horse paddock and in some sort of raised bed filled with compost. this year of course, I’m growing in old tires.[attachment=0:2ofvvnw6]tire corn2.jpg[/attachment:2ofvvnw6] Just for FYI, there are 56 stalks of cornmeal corn in each of those tires……..

    #56926
    readyforshtf
    Member

    @mmpaints wrote:

    Actually, indoor growing is how I get such a jump on everybody else in this are for my harvest. It is also how I have fresh cucumbers all winter long(cuc fetish, gotta have em). There are seasons here that if I did not grow indoors, it wouldnt get my first plant in the ground until June 1st ( normal is april 15th)

    The soil here is crap. a nasty, thick redish brown clay that sticks to everything and does not drain in any way or form. I grow my crops in the horse paddock and in some sort of raised bed filled with compost. this year of course, I’m growing in old tires.[attachment=0:1omtli96]tire corn2.jpg[/attachment:1omtli96] Just for FYI, there are 56 stalks of cornmeal corn in each of those tires……..

    WOW that’s a lot of corn in a small space.

    #56927
    mmpaints
    Participant

    Yes it is. We had an argument about growing corn a couple months ago where somebody was expressing their opinion that a person needs a bunch of space to grow corn. Of course, that simply is not the case. You can grow corn anywhere, even in a bucket. The tassle is the pollinator, the wind shakes the stalk and the pollen drops down on the silks. As long as you can get the pollen to the silks, you can grow corn. You can even grow corn in an indoor setting providing you have a good light source.

    #56928
    readyforshtf
    Member

    @mmpaints wrote:

    Yes it is. We had an argument about growing corn a couple months ago where somebody was expressing their opinion that a person needs a bunch of space to grow corn. Of course, that simply is not the case. You can grow corn anywhere, even in a bucket. The tassle is the pollinator, the wind shakes the stalk and the pollen drops down on the silks. As long as you can get the pollen to the silks, you can grow corn. You can even grow corn in an indoor setting providing you have a good light source.

    Interesting. I too thought it took a lot of space. I have 20-25 in a 6’x2′ planter box and I thought that might be a bit over crowded. After seeing your picture I realize I could have put 50-60 in there 😀

    #56929
    itsadisaster
    Participant

    Thanks for sharing mm .. I, um, “borrowed” your pic and sent to my Mom so she could visualize what I described. She’s got great soil and gardens but never grown corn or wheat. Will be now tho thanks to you! 🙂 p.s. readyforshtf .. thank you for sharing your grow light stuff. 😀

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