Canning Vegetables at Home

This topic contains 6 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Zero Source 3 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #66020

    ReadyMom
    Moderator

    Here’s an ‘Oldie But Goodie’ that I found, in my files from the original APN forum. It’s from Paladin, back in 2006!

    – – – – – – –

    http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/

    An important word about home canning of vegetables

    People still canning green beans at home using the boiling water canner instead of a tested pressure canning process are risking food loss and even worse, possible death or serious poisoning. We are receiving phone calls from people canning dozens and dozens of jars of green beans in boiling water and then losing all that work and food due to spoilage. Beans canned this way looked fine coming out of the canner, but are now turning cloudy and jars are popping open, even sometimes with force. These beans are definitely spoiling from being underprocessed. But it could be worse: even if the jars still look good, it is possible that they contain botulism toxin from this unsafe canning practice.

    Jars of improperly canned vegetables and meats can contain the deadly botulism toxin without showing signs of spoilage such as being seen in the reports mentioned above. Those that do show signs of spoilage could also contain botulism toxin because they are showing other signs of underprocessing.

    Spores of Clostridium botulinum bacteria, as found naturally in soils, are very, very heat resistant. Even hours in the boiling water canner will not kill them if they are inside your jars of beans. Left alive after canning, they will eventually germinate into actively growing bacterial cells that will produce a deadly human toxin when consumed. The bacteria like the conditions inside closed jars of low-acid foods (such as vegetables and meats) sitting at room temperature, so they must be killed during the canning process for safe storage.

    You can find the USDA-recommended procedures for canning green beans at home here: http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_04/bea … alian.html
    The list of available vegetable canning processes is found at this menu:
    http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can4_vegetable.html
    and those for tomato and tomato products here:
    http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can3_tomato.html

    We do not have home canning procedures to recommend for vegetable, meat, poultry or seafood products not found on this website.

    You can read a little more about botulism and ensuring safe home canned foods here: http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/general/en … foods.html
    and principles about safe canning at home here: http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/general.html

    Please be safe when canning foods for you and your family! Knowledge and recommendations change over time with scientific developments. You should use up-to-date recommendations and methods and not just rely on practices of past generations.

    • This topic was modified 6 months, 2 weeks ago by  ReadyMom.
    #8610

    ReadyMom
    Moderator

    I never thought about doing this, till I read the following post from Elona in the thread “Re: What did you do to prep this week?” (page 84)

    by Elona ยป Sat Feb 19, 2011 4:23 pm

    Right now I have 8 jars of dried black beans cooked and in the canner. It just seems more cost effective and energy efficient with dried beans to cook a very large batch and then pressure can them.

    So …. I looked into this a little more and found another site where it’s discussed some more:

    canning dried beans
    http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/harvest/msg101611571110.html



    MORE:

    How to can your own homemade dried beans and peas
    http://www.pickyourown.org/canningdriedbeans.htm

    #23709

    JAMabry
    Member

    Does anyone have any info on canning cabbage soup.

    #29542

    Vasco12
    Member

    I have pressure canned baby carrots a two pound bag made five pints.
    What I observed was that several of my canned carrots now contain a water level below the recommended space from the top of the rim which is one inch, several of my cans now are almost two inches below the rim.
    Some of my carrots in two of my canning jars are not submerged or completely covered in water. The cans are completely sealed.
    Will this effect/affect the quality of my carrots or will they be ruined.

    At your service always!
    Vasco12

    #41371

    Darlene7
    Member

    I know how to cook potatoes in the 1 pint jars and the time required, but have been searching the web to see how long I would pressure cook jars that are 1-1/2 pint size and how much salt to add

    #48691

    Zero Source
    Participant

    Can anybody give me an idea as to how many pounds of green beans will fill a quart? Or quarts per pound.

    I have always wanted to can green beans and by golly I am going to do it next weekend.

    #50736

    Zero Source
    Participant

    I have canned potatoes, but never with the skins on them.

    Has anyone ever canned potatoes with the skins on? I am curious as to any good or bad experiences or thoughts.

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