June 2018 – What Did You Do To Prep This Week/Month?

Welcome to APN! Forums Survival, Preparedness, and Sustainability Disaster Preparedness General Preparedness Discussion June 2018 – What Did You Do To Prep This Week/Month?

This topic contains 52 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  NJMike 4 months, 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 53 total)
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  • #63956

    Cin
    Participant

    Thanks, Ice. I’ve been slowly cutting the toweling as I get time.

    I am jealous, Illini – I’ve been scoping out yard sales for good binoculars for a long time – found lots of unsatisfactory ones. 🙁 My Dad found a great pair, they were some kind of German ones, they are awesome!

    In other news, the consignment shop called me today – owner says she always calls the new crafter when they make their first sale – I made a $30 sale! YAY!

    #63959

    tamtbell
    Participant

    Installed two new security cameras which has been on our to do list for a bit. Gotten some work in the garden but still have a massive amount of work to do there. Have some clearing that needs to be done. Out of our 3 hives, we think one died, sadly. One of the other three are rockstars though; they’re going nuts with expanding. We acquired 4 new chicks, easter eggers. These add to our current flock of 2. Our rabbits are doing great; currently have 2 boys; 3 girls; two of the girls are due any day now.
    Earlier this year we installed bidets in all toilets. This reduces our usage of tp, good for now as it saves $$, but works even better later on.
    Thankfully some of our grafted apple trees made it through the winter and they’re doing reasonably okay. Our gooseberries are so so; jostaberries came back; saskatoons looking lovely; honeyberries hanging on after my husband ran over one of them with the lawnmower. Chokecherries; raspberries; currants are doing excellent! Managed to make some more birch syrup before heading out on vacation. Only 2 pints and a half pint. Got some spruce tip jelly made too a week ago. About to be harvesting roses shortly, just hoping I’m feeling better by then as I’m under the weather with a allergy induced cold.

    Thats it at our place!

    #63960

    IceFire
    Moderator

    IceFire: I notice you didn’t mention Coffee in your haul from the commissary. Are you a non-coffee drinker? or does the commissary not have great prices on coffee any more?

    Illini:

    While I DO drink coffee, I limit myself to 1 cup first thing in the morning (any more/later than that, and I DON’T sleep at night) and I have a pretty good “stash” of it on hand, so didn’t buy any. Right now, with me on “temporary unpaid vacation” (in other words, the one job ended, and I haven’t found another yet) I’m only replenishing what we use.

    #63962

    NJMike
    Participant

    It’s continued to rain every few days here. There’s still a small swamp out back past the container garden. I put out more mosquito larvacide to keep the population down, but since the whole area and wetlands/woods beyond is wet, I’m expecting a very buggy summer.

    On the bug topic, I found a deal on 10% concentrated Permethrin for livestock at Tractor Supply. I picked up two 32oz containers at $16 each. Normally for clothing treatment (say for hiking), I’d buy Sawyer’s Permethrin which is around $13 for 24oz at 0.5% concentration. Using a dilution calculator (or paper and pen math), the 10% concentrate will yield 10 gallons of 0.5% spray, which is equivalent to over 50 bottles of Sawyer.

    For the container garden, I added a few more plants. The cucumber plants are doing great with all the rain, peppers are doing alright and the tomatoes are so-so.

    I’ve still been hitting flea markets and thrift stores. Recently added an old metal wide mouth water jerry can, just needs a seal. I intend to use for non-potable water use, since who knows what’s been in it over the years. Related to radio/electronics, I picked up a vintage resistance box for next to nothing, so we’ll see if it’s still operable when I have some down time to play around. In a similar manner, I spied a miniscope (oscilloscope) from the late 70’s at a Thrift store. It was a little steep at $50. I have a coupon for 50% off for today, and did some research, so going back tonight and will pick it up if the CRT is still good, since the internal batteries are still available online and I’ve printed out the manual and wiring schematic.

    Later this week I have a Lasik consult. If I’m a good candidate, I could hopefully be free of corrective lenses in the next few weeks. Crossing my fingers.

    #63966

    TRex2
    Participant

    While I DO drink coffee, I limit myself to 1 cup first thing in the morning (any more/later than that, and I DON’T sleep at night) and I have a pretty good “stash” of it on hand, so didn’t buy any. Right now, with me on “temporary unpaid vacation” (in other words, the one job ended, and I haven’t found another yet) I’m only replenishing what we use.

    Thanks for the reply. I am on the other end of the spectrum, so I always keep a pretty heavy stash on hand, and constantly scan for prices.

    #63970

    IceFire
    Moderator

    Wired hardware cloth along the lower portion of the fencing between the first and second chicken runs (which means that the 1st run has the lower portion COMPLETELY blocked from varmints or chicks running through the chain link)and half of the front of the second run. After that, ran more hardware cloth around the lower portion of the far side and front of the third run.

    Got another 25 foot roll of hardware cloth so should be able to do the lower portion of the fencing between the second and third run, and finish the front of the second run.

    #63974

    Cin
    Participant

    Ordered and received the #10 cans of freeze-dried refried beans, thanks to a coupon received. Ordered and received the Maxpedition EDC bag for the new truck (each vehicle has it’s own EDC). Ordered and received parts to alter some lighters, making some butane and one a mini-blow-torch for lighting fires. We have several different lighters in strategic places, including my purse and the EDCs.

    My deck garden is doing well – unripened, but have tomatoes, cucumbers and bell peppers making an appearance. Japanese beetles are all over my orange tree,not sure what’s happening there. I shook it a bit, and they flew off, haven’t returned and it’s been hours. The orange tree did bloom again (2nd time this year) along one or two branches and now has tiny oranges on it.

    Husband made two wood racks under our new carport for the wood we’ve received (bought some, got the rest for free). He is now cleaning up the old wood pile area, burning the rotten wood and salvaging the rest for this coming winter.

    I’m decluttering my sewing room, cutting scraps into squares to make quick quilts for various family members.

    #63975

    IceFire
    Moderator

    Later this week I have a Lasik consult. If I’m a good candidate, I could hopefully be free of corrective lenses in the next few weeks. Crossing my fingers.

    NJ Mike…Even if you CAN’T get LASIK (I couldn’t…corneas were too thin and steep) you may STILL be able to have PRK (that’s what I ended up having.) Slightly different technique, and you don’t get the instant “WOW” effect…it takes up to 6 months for the full correction to take effect, although your vision will STILL be better right afterward. Only downside to it is that the 1st 3 days you will have a LOT of tearing and burning feeling…it’s your eyes trying to clear the chemicals. It was still worth doing!

    #63976

    IceFire
    Moderator

    Finished the wiring at the bottom of the run fencing between the 2nd and 3rd chicken runs. After that, used the backhoe on the tractor to dig out a mesquite stump that was growing again right in the middle of where one of the new coops is supposed to go. When that was done, started digging in and setting the concrete “piers” that will support the bottom framework of the new coops. Only had time to get a few of them in.

    Transplanted 21 of my huckleberry starts from the starting cells into pots.

    Also went in to town to get a couple new motorcycle keys made for hubs, then stopped at the grocery store…they had cantaloupe on sale for 75 cents each! Got 3 of them. Cut the first one up, and filled 2 quart-sized freezer bags…one for the fridge to go in husband’s lunches, and one in the freezer for later use. The other 2 will get cut up and put into freezer bags for the freezer.

    • This reply was modified 5 months ago by  IceFire.
    #63978

    mom2grandma
    Participant

    just finished planting the garden. I do have about 12 little green cherry tomatoes and a few very small peppers on the vines. my job is over for the year. so am a stay at home grandma. this means I am taxi service and babysitter for grandkids. am trying to raise meat chickens. not very successful. started with 25 down to 16. trying to determine what to do about laying hens. they are getting old -3 years come August. egg production is down but still eat as much. any suggestions???

    #63979

    IceFire
    Moderator

    One thing to remember about meat chickens…you need to process them between 6 and 8 weeks of age. Otherwise, because their growth rate is so fast, their hearts and blood vessels can not keep up, so they tend to die if kept longer than that.

    As to the layers…when they get too old to lay, then it’s time for the stew pot. Older birds do tend to be a bit tougher than young ones, so are best used in dishes with a lot of liquid: stewed, used in soups, pot pies, or pressure cooked/canned.

    #63980

    Ice you’re so right about old chickens being tough. Had an old rooster that just didn’t like life, always attacking somebody. It took after the granddaughter last year and it met its fate.

    I smoked it long, slow and low heat, just as tender as if it came out of a pot of stew. You ought to try smoking one old chicken, very good.

    #63981

    TRex2
    Participant

    IceFire Said:

    One thing to remember about meat chickens…you need to process them between 6 and 8 weeks of age. Otherwise, because their growth rate is so fast, their hearts and blood vessels can not keep up, so they tend to die if kept longer than that.

    Wow. Until you brought that up, I thought those were a myth.
    How much do they eat?
    (and what do you feed them, where you live?)

    • This reply was modified 5 months ago by  TRex2.
    #63983

    I ordered and received last week a 4 inch ceramic, silver impregnated dome water filter and decided to use it and have the water tested.

    I took water from one of the ponds on the farm, filtered it thru an old coffee maker/filter to get the sediment out and then put it in the five gallon bucket system I built.

    I then took the purified water to a test sight which they gave me a steril bottle to put the water in. I got the report back today and all is good to go, no bacteria, virus’s or heavy metals.

    The water test cost me 20 bucks but was well worth the money.

    #63984

    IceFire
    Moderator

    Wow. Until you brought that up, I thought those were a myth.
    How much do they eat?
    (and what do you feed them, where you live?)

    No, they are NOT a myth. I call them “Frankenchickens.” I only had 2… got them by mistake, as I THOUGHT I was getting White Leghorns (that’s what they were marked as, so SOMEBODY screwed up at the hatchery.)

    As to feed, I gave them NON-medicated chick starter/grower. They were in with the other chicks I had bought at the same time. The difference in growth rate was obvious after only a couple of days. I ended up processing the first one at about 7 weeks, as the others were pecking a hole in his backside. I was going to process the other one on Saturday of the following week, when I had the time, but it died a couple of days before then. I just stick to the dual-purpose heritage breeds, and either cull out excess roosters or hens that aren’t laying any more.

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