Keeping Food Fresh

This topic contains 8 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 8 years, 8 months ago.

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #534

    Below is By: John (the) Christian and re-posted by:Pioneer Living http://www.pioneerliving.net

    In the book, “Keeping Food Fresh,” by Janet Bailey, the preservation times the author gives are definitely not meant for great-tribulation survivors, but more for the queen’s kitchen. For example, she says that a cut green pepper should not be kept in the refrigerator more than two days, or that plums will only keep 3 to 5 days there. Don’t let books like these fool you; the given upper limits define the maintenance of foods at their peak. In the tribulation, several degrees of deterioration from the perfect condition is not the main concern.

    Janet says that pecans in the shell will keep only six months in the refrigerator, but our down-to-earth experts, Mike and Nancy, give them one year. Janet means that pecans will begin to deteriorate after 6 months in a cold place, while Mike and Nancy mean that the deterioration after one year’s storage is minimal and acceptable for modern standards. That means trib’ survivors who have pecan trees may continue to eat their nuts for a lot longer than one year, although, of course, there should be an annual harvest to depend on.

    Janet says that we shouldn’t keep white flour for more than a year in a refrigerator. She also says whole wheat kernels should not be stored in the refrigerator for more than 4 or 5 months, while Mike and Nancy give whole wheat 3 to 4 years, and others even longer. Ignore writers like Janet, and try to buy enough white flour and whole wheat kernels at the outset of the great tribulation to last that entire span of time. That is my advice, and if you want an expert opinion, it would be easy for you to get one.

    Remember that Joseph of ancient Egypt was able to keep wheat edible for the full seven-year famine. There’s a lesson in this: wheat kept away from air will last a long time. Or, plan on using large bins to store flour and similar dried foods, but keep them in a cool place– i.e. your root cellar. Properly stored, wheat kernels will last up to 15 years. But a word of importance to those who think there’s no harm in buying/storing too early: the nutritional value of stored foods decreases with time as chemical changes occur. So, while after 15 years you may still have wheat in an edible condition, it might be more nutritious to eat fresh grass.

    On the other hand, if all Christians decide to buy their foods at the last minute, which is what I prescribe and fear all at once, there will likely be food shortages so that you may not be able to get large enough supplies to last for even a few months–perhaps none at all!! Furthermore, there is indication already that the governments won’t allow you to store foods for long periods, which they might call, “hoarding,” in order to make “storage” appear evil. These are very good reasons to plan a garden and greenhouse in combination with efforts outlined in this chapter for making purchases. There. Now you have been warned.

    Try, but don’t depend on, buying your entire tribulation stock of foods! To avoid hoarding laws, buy long-lasters early in the final Week while national supplies are not yet short. This is why I have shared several details of prophecies within the first half of the final Week, in hopes that you might have the knowledge needed to begin/continue preparing at that time with all determination, skill, and wisdom. Remember, it is not “hoarding” if you buy slowly over months when the supplies are not threatened.

    Unfortunately, however, I have heard that governments are secretly making laws to disallow the people from storing foods at all; other than what is needed immediately, within about a month! All the more reason to plan on growing your own food, and to keep messages like this one from going all-out public. But, of course, God is bigger than anti-Christian governments. And, if messages like this don’t go out at all, won’t that be worse? The last thing we need, though, is someone who thinks he can make some big money on this “novel” subject by publishing an “exciting” best-seller with all sorts of beans spilled before our foes that should be kept in the bag. God is also bigger than that horny goat, by the way, wherever he may be.

    You can grow your own wheat and grind it to a flour, though common advice tells us to grind small amounts at a time, to prevent deterioration and nutrient loss. Grinders sell for under $100, but it would make sense to buy the more expensive models (see the URL at the end of this chapter). Depending on the model, it takes between 5 and 15 minutes to grind enough flour to make one loaf of bread. A bushel of wheat kernels weighs about 60 pounds, and it will net about 50 pounds of whole wheat flour, enough to provide about 70 loaves of bread. So, if you’re going to grow your own wheat, you’ll need about 5 bushels per year for every loaf per day.

    The yield per acre depends on the soil conditions and the amount of rainfall. Wheat can grow in areas having as little as 15 inches of precipitation annually, or as much as 70 inches. It will even grow as far north as the Arctic circle. In dry or infertile areas where the yield is 10 bushels per acre, you’ll need almost an acre to provide one loaf of bread per day. An acre is about 43,000 square feet, or just larger than a 200 x 200 foot patch. In ideal growing conditions, however, using mechanical equipment, the yield can be higher than 75 bushels per acre, and when irrigation is applied, some farmers obtain 125 bushels.

    Seed can be thrown by hand onto the field, but the growth of the wheat will be patchy. But even if we assume the tribulation yield to be as low as 20 bushels per acre, then for one loaf per day, only 1/4 of an acre is required, which translates into a patch of ground 100-feet square. This is quite manageable. If your grow an entire acre, you can produce wheat-based food in an amount equivalent to four loaves per day, which is more like what you should be aiming for since your family will want to eat more than bread. How about some pastas, pizzas, and wheat cereals? If you don’t have an acre for wheat, take greater care and make your quarter-acre achieve the 80-bushel-per-acre yield.

    Store-bought white flour consists of one wheat-kernel part only: the endosperm. This part has the least fat and, therefore, lasts the longest. The other two parts, the bran and germ, have been removed precisely because they are higher in fat and therefore spoil sooner. Therefore, avoid the purchase of bran and germ flours for long-term storage, as they may go too rancid.

    Rye, barley, buckwheat and oat flours are all high in fat and do not last as long as white flour. White-rice flour lasts much longer than brown-rice flour for the same “fat” reason. Gluten flour, a hard-wheat, high-protein product, has long-lasting features, but triticale, a product with similar features, does not last as long. Semolina flour, used for making pastas, is a hard durum wheat product and, like white flour, is made only with the wheat’s endosperm so that it, too, outlasts whole grain flours. Potato flour is long-lasting, as is degerminated cornmeal flour, but bran and soy flours are relatively high in fat. Soy and barley flours, as well as others, because they have no gluten or starch of their own, must be mixed with white flour in most bread recipes (to get the flour to rise).

    The point here is not to confuse or overwhelm you, but to show that all flours are not the same, and that what might at first appear to be a simple matter is filled with complications that, unless dealt with wisely, could lead to complications in your trib’ life. Before you buy big for the tribulation, look into the preservation limits of all flours, and their special uses, but don’t take as the final word anything claimed by those who sell or market the products, as they are prone to give misleading advice for the sake of making sales.

    And do buy big because flour is cheap, nutritious, and can be used in a variety of ways. Wheat products are so nutritious, one can live for a long period on them alone. Just don’t fail to purchase “enriched” white flour because, to make up for the removal of nutrients when the bran and germ are sacrificed, it is re-packed with the same (riboflavin, niacin, thiamine, vitamin A and iron).

    Aside from flours/kernels, you should buy large supplies of ready-to-eat wheat products like pasta and cereal. Corn Flakes and Cheerios will outlast whole grain products! Like white flour, these cereals have had their fat-containing bran and germ removed. Janet says that the ready-to-eat cereals will last one full year in unopened boxes in cool, dry places. As Janet is much too conservative in her upper limits for trib’ survival purposes, I would venture to guess that these cereals would keep well for the entire tribulation period, especially if we stored them in large bins.

    If you must avoid high sugar intake, you can get ready-to-eat products that have as little as 5%. Try to buy the more dense cereals to make good use of storage space; some cereals are almost all air. However, some of the more dense cereals, like Harvest Crunch, are not enriched with vitamins and nutrients like most other cereals. Still, my choice could very well end up being Harvest-Crunch like cereals to conserve shelf space, with a daily vitamin tablet (for about 42 months, that’s 1300 tablets).

    Whole-grain cereals include barley, buckwheat, hominy (cracked corn), millet, oats, rye, rice and wheat. Among these, pearl barley and hominy keep best, but, I suspect, corn is not the most nutritious of these various food sources.

    Pasta, if factory dried, lasts a long time. Buy large amounts of this very inexpensive food, because along with being very good for you, it is filling. Some pastas are enriched with nutrients. Like cereals, pasta comes in many shapes, some offering lots of air per package that not only takes up more room, but slightly alters the chemical state. Flat, straight spaghetti would seem to me to be the most densely-packed pasta. Home-made pasta is easy to make, but even when dried, it does not last as long as factory-made products. But then, who needs it to? You can grind it as you need it. You can even use your homemade whole-wheat flour, or the store bought white-flour, instead of the ideal semolina flour. Just roll your dough as thin as you can, cut it up, and/or manipulate it into any shape you want. Put your artwork or strips into a pot of hot water, and you’ll have linguini or gnochi just like that. Curl the flattened dough and stuff the inners with meat or whatever your heart desires, and you’ll have ravioli and cantonelle too!

    If having a full tribulation store of flour, cereal and pasta isn’t enough variety along with your fresh and dried vegetables and fruits, you can also add white rice to your menu, which, because it lasts as indefinitely as pasta, could be purchased in large amounts (highly recommended). The difference between white and brown rice is that the white has had its bran removed. Again, in order to make up for it, vitamins and minerals are sometimes added to it. Wild rice, which is not a true rice, but a seed of a grass plant which grows in the northern United States, lasts as long as white rice.

    Sugar and salt last forever. Both can be used to preserve foods. Both taste great in foods so preserved. Buy big! Your fruits will last longer if kept in a simple syrup made of water and 20-65% sugar (amount depends on your taste buds and on the acidity of the fruit). Molasses, honey, and maple syrup will last the entire tribulation. Sugar substitutes never spoil. Sugary foods may be considered luxuries, but there is a good argument to be made for including “comfort foods” in days of affliction. Salt will be useful in preserving fish and other meats, as well as butter (use 2.5% salt) and cheeses.

    Herbs and spices, because they are dried, are long-lifers. You can enjoy growing them yourself and then use fresh in your cooking. Some are useful in preserving foods. Some will make your garden experiences more joyful. Mint in your tea sounds very nice.

    Janet suggests that coffee, ground or instant, will last one full year if the jar is not opened, but she only gives freeze-dried 6 months. She gives tea 6-12 months. But as these are dried foods too, they should last as long as water/humidity doesn’t get to them.

    She gives canned fruit juices a year in a cool place. As canned drinks are mostly water, I wouldn’t buy them for tribulation survival, however, as they take up too much room. Ascorbic acid is a preservative as well as a vitamin (C), and it would probably be a good idea to buy dried juices (powders) enriched with it. Dried milk powder is also a long-laster, but not a necessity. Contrary to popular belief, we can survive without milk. The dairy industry has spent millions convincing us that calcium from their products is vital. There are other foods high in calcium–even calcium tablets. Some waters are high in calcium too.

    Cheeses can be made on your site. If packed in bricks or cakes one over top the other, they will last much longer. Hard cheeses, as you might expect, last the longest. Firm Cheddars (Colby, Cheshire, Derby), Edam, Gouda, and mozzarella are durable, but feta, provolone, and Asiago are longer-lasting, while hard Parmesan and Port du Salut do still better. But without refrigeration, you’ll get mold much quicker, even in a root cellar, because cheese is not without significant water content. The mozzarella in my fridge is 45% water and 28% milk fat.

    You’ll have to weigh the high expense of cheese with the benefits if you’re going to purchase. Cheese is a dense product packed with fat that can substitute for meatless periods. And it goes well with many dishes. But if you plan on having goats, you can have free milk and curds (cottage cheese or ricotta) as well as the meat. You can preserve cheese longer by storing it in salty water (i.e. brine), but nothing stores it better than keeping it in your animals until it’s needed.

    #53377

    IceFire
    Moderator

    To help extend the life of my stored foods, I bought a vacuum sealer. Flour, rice, sugar, and pretty much ALL of my boxed or bagged supplies, as well as meats, cheeses, etc. that I put into the freezer get the vacuum-sealer treatment.

    Also, I recomment that one stores what they eat, and eat what they store. In other words, when you bring food home, date it with a sharpie marker on the front of the can/package (I use the “use by” date on the can rather than the purchase date, because you never know how long something was sitting in the warehouse and then on the store shelf before you purchased it), and then put it in “rotation” on your shelf. That way, you are constantly using and replenishing your stores so you don’t have to worry about “outdated” food.

    #53378

    Carriebelle
    Member

    @icefire wrote:

    That way, you are constantly using and replenishing your stores so you don’t have to worry about “outdated” food.

    I always wonder when I hear that someone has so many cans of an item for storage. If it isn’t rotated. couldn’t you end up with a lot of expired cans? I am persistent in looking at the can dates for food my elderly parents, but they get upset when I insist something needs to be thrown out. I completely understand the “depression mentality,” as I have it too, but I want them to be safe and well. Are there canned foods that can be safely used after their expiration dates? Thanks for your help and all the good information.

    #53379

    IceFire
    Moderator

    Most canned foods are still safe to eat beyond the “expiration” date, however, there will be a decline in quality (texture/color) and nutritional value. If cans are dented, bulging, or rusting, though, definitely get rid of them.

    #53380

    kymber
    Member

    IceFire is right – most canned foods are still safe beyond the expiration date…but i would only hold on to and use something a few months beyond expiration. its better to stay on top of rotation Carriebelle. and IF really hit the nail on the head – DO NOT consume anything from a can that is dented, bulging or rusting! good call IF!

    #53381

    D_Loki
    Participant

    Note on old canned goods:

    Studies have show that even after 20 years, calories, salt, fat, carbohydrate and protein contents remained very close to their original levels. Vitamins however slowly deplete over time, texture may degrade as well . Any can that has been stored well will render the same results. If moisture and temperature controls have been implemented, your canned goods will be safe for some time. Basically put, in a survival situation you can get sustenance from old canned goods as long as you have vitamin supplements of some source, be it in pill form, or from foraging.

    Remember the old stand-by as noted by kymber…………..dispose of rusted, dented, bulging, or smelly cans.

    #53382

    kymber
    Member

    good info D_Loki….thanks for that!

    #53383

    Unonius2
    Member

    Good to see entrepreneurial people on this site.

    I’ll join in, too!

    Since so few people have the thousands of dollars it needs to start food storage, a company decided to do two things, to both help people get going in food storage;and to help them become financially self reliant.

    I am a distributor in the USA for a company called
    Shelf Reliance.

    Check out the site, and, since we are a ‘party plan’ company, like Tupperware, Avon, etc.
    I’d really like it if you sent me a message to learn more about how you can prepare and share!

    http://www.shelfreliance.com

    And, pursuant to this topic, almost all of their products have a 15-25 YEAR shelf life! Now, THAT’s Keeping food fresh, until you need it!

    John

    #53384

    Anonymous
    Member

    @unonius2 wrote:

    Good to see entrepreneurial people on this site.

    I’ll join in, too!

    Since so few people have the thousands of dollars it needs to start food storage, a company decided to do two things, to both help people get going in food storage;and to help them become financially self reliant.

    I am a distributor in the USA for a company called
    Shelf Reliance.

    Check out the site, and, since we are a ‘party plan’ company, like Tupperware, Avon, etc.
    I’d really like it if you sent me a message to learn more about how you can prepare and share!

    http://www.shelfreliance.com

    And, pursuant to this topic, almost all of their products have a 15-25 YEAR shelf life! Now, THAT’s Keeping food fresh, until you need it!

    John

    Hopefully customer service has changed for the better…

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

American Preppers Network Forum