long term survival

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 41 total)
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  • #581
    k-mcfar4
    Member

    My concerns are more on a long-term basis. I am prepared in every fashion to provide for and protect my family for 60 days or so. After that it is hard to foresee the needs. I am prepared to leave the city and have located a remote, albeit humble, living quarters. However, in my Wyoming climate, remote can sometimes be deadly. Since I am convinced we will see the end of our society as we know it, should I be considering a relocation to a more moderate climate?

    #54769

    Unfortunetly travel in long distances will more than likely become very difficult at best and down right dangerous worse case. In addition to fuel requirements which could be better served staying put, you will have to be mindful of ambushes and bridge outages in addition to problems with refugees, local militias or law enforcement etc etc.

    Timing would be the key element here in my opinion. If you were to get out early enough, perhaps.

    #54770
    mmpaints
    Participant

    I live very rural and I like it. I have no intention of going anywhere, I’m staying righ there. I do have family in a major suburban area(chicago area) and from my recent visit there, I can not imagine come shtf how anyone would get out of there. Even on a Sunday night at 9:30pm, there was tons of traffic and thousands of people walking around even in the cold and snowing weather. If you tried to leave the area in a panic type situation, I would think that the roads would be completely clogged with vehicles and people.

    Now for what I think about actually getting out and headed toward a bug out type place… How familiar are you with the place you plan to bug out to? How often do you stay there and really know the lay of the land? How well is it protected as far as having your preps there and can you be sure all your preps will still be there when you arrive? How many other people may have already spotted your BOL prior to a shtf situation, etc and so on…

    #54771
    hopetogro
    Member

    I think if your humble quarters has ample heating(wood stove) and plenty of fuel (stockpile of wood) you should have enough for at least one harsh season. Keep your preps there and visit to rotate your stock if needed. For dangerous wildlife I guess you will have to prepare yourself. Do you hunt or trap? It may be good to look into.

    #54772
    k-mcfar4
    Member

    I know my “BOL” very well and there are probably only three other people in the world that know of it. It is also very defendable. But, that’s not my concern. At some point, no matter how well prepared I might be, I will have to come off the mountain, maybe forced by weather, maybe by lack of provisions. Water and big game are abundant, but eventually I will need more than that.
    Ken

    #54773

    In response to should you go to a more moderate climate. I have two locations myself, one in a warmer, swamps and isolated area and one that is cooler, mountainess and isolated area. I dont know which one would be best but will use the one that provides best for my family and the one I can get to fastest. Prepareness past 60 days depends on the area and the amount of people who will be traveling thru and to that area. If you have chosen an isolated are that can provide fuel for warmth (wood) and animals/fish (food) and fresh water that is well off the beaten trail as my two locations are I would suggest that you look more at extended stays over 60 days. Look at the water in the area, can you build storage system, food pantries, can you build root cellars and dryed meat storage, can you stock cut wood and plant items that come back each year, wild raseberries, wild strawberries, blackberries, bluberries, root items. Planting these will allow them to come back yearly and provide food substinanace for the future. You are set for at least 60 days, now look at what would be needed for the next 60 and put it on paper then look 120 out, then 240 out then 480 out, think of the worst situation scenario and always put it on paper, then build on that. Just some thoughts.

    #54774
    GreenGlove
    Member

    If you have a chosen location, plant an “edible landscape” with perrenials and woody plants that do well in that area. It is not an obvious food store, perpetuates itself and many people wouldn’t know a paw paw tree, butternut tree or blue berry bush if it hit them in a head with a limb. Around here, (east TN) competing with the deer for my plants can put meat in the freezer, or smoke house if it comes down to it. 😎 I am a caffine junkie and Camellia sinensis (tea) does very well here. I just got my first tea bush this fall. Java wouldn’t make it here. The plant option is not open to everyone, I know, but every environment has it’s own strengths. The native folks did very well in their chosen locations by getting to know what could and couldn’t be done and knowing their land like their own skin. It is a learning process, for sure.

    #54775
    mmpaints
    Participant

    GreenGlove has a point. Just about every part of the world has ancient peoples that managed to survive there. We just have to learn how. The instinct might be surpressed but it isn’t gone.

    #54776
    IceFire
    Moderator

    @GreenGlove wrote:

    If you have a chosen location, plant an “edible landscape” with perrenials and woody plants that do well in that area. It is not an obvious food store, perpetuates itself and many people wouldn’t know a paw paw tree, butternut tree or blue berry bush if it hit them in a head with a limb. Around here, (east TN) competing with the deer for my plants can put meat in the freezer, or smoke house if it comes down to it. 😎 I am a caffine junkie and Camellia sinensis (tea) does very well here. I just got my first tea bush this fall. Java wouldn’t make it here. The plant option is not open to everyone, I know, but every environment has it’s own strengths. The native folks did very well in their chosen locations by getting to know what could and couldn’t be done and knowing their land like their own skin. It is a learning process, for sure.

    I agree with you. I am a firm believer in edible landscaping, and try to incorporate plants that do “double duty” as much as possible (for example trees that provide both shade and fruit/nuts) Herbs can easily be worked into your landscaping, as well, and there are even a lot of vegetables that are quite ornamental (for example, scarlet runner beans). And you’re right…most people wouldn’t recognize the food growing if you hit them over the head with it.

    #54777
    kymber
    Member

    this is a great discussion guys and gals! i think that if you are fortunate enough to have a BOL in a temperate climate then go for it. however, for the majority of people that is not possible – i am speaking for most Canadians – bahahaha – unless our good friends in Texas or New Mexico can provide some sort of free pass into the state for Canadians!

    however – i think what is really important is learning all about the climate that you live in or the climate that your BOL is located in and plan accordingly – plan for water, shelter and food to match the climate that you are in or going to. edible landscaping is also a great idea. but learning to identify naturally-occurring, local, wild foods in your area is also a must! being able to forage for food is a skill that all preppers should learn!

    from a personal point of view – i am not sure if or when serious S is going to HTF. but changes are coming! and because my hubby and i really believe that – we had put all of our extra money into paying off all debt and once that was done, we started saving for and purchased a BOL that will eventually become our full-time homestead. getting rid of debt might take a while – but if you really commit – you can do it! we are are planning on making the move to the BOL in the next 1-2 years. we have selected a location that is sparsely populated, plentiful fish and game and a decent growing season (at least for Canada). what we have spent the last 2 years doing is learning and practicing all of the skills that we will need to know in order to homestead full-time and try to get off the grid.

    #54778
    idahobob
    Member

    @k-mcfar4 wrote:

    My concerns are more on a long-term basis. I am prepared in every fashion to provide for and protect my family for 60 days or so. After that it is hard to foresee the needs. I am prepared to leave the city and have located a remote, albeit humble, living quarters. However, in my Wyoming climate, remote can sometimes be deadly. Since I am convinced we will see the end of our society as we know it, should I be considering a relocation to a more moderate climate?

    Nope. I understand how rough the weather in Wyoming can get, I lived there for 10 years. But that is also a deterrent to those who will be wanting to make the great escape from the cities.

    When TSHTF, and that is when, not if, you really want to be at least one tank of gas away from a major population area. You say you live in a city……didn’t know that there were any in Wyoming! 😆 One thing that you should be really working hard at, right now, is networking with like minded people in your area. Start a MAG. You will not be able to survive all by your lonesome after TSHTF or TEOTWAWKI. We need like minded friends that are willing and capable of watching our backs, and visa versa. They are out there, sometimes ya just gotta shake the trees real hard!! But you also need to be careful, don’t go broadcasting around what you do or do not have.

    We live in a VERY rural area, and we are staying right here. Unfortunately, all family (grown children and grandchildren) live at least a two days drive from us. So, when the excrement hits the revolving blade, we really do not expect any of them to make it here. Sadly, out of 5 grown children with spouses, only one couple listens to us about prepping , and they live in Tennessee.

    Develop what you have and stock up for the LONG term.

    Bob
    III

    #54779
    kymber
    Member

    Bob…you know that you are my hero …right?

    #54780
    mmpaints
    Participant

    LOL. Things like flour, sugar, salt, that basics for cooking and baking, they all store for a long time and are not expensive. Sooner or later everybody that wants to be prepared is going to have to learn how to feed themselves the “old fashioned” way. ya gotta learn to cook folks. You’d be amazed at how long a 5 gallon bucket full of flour will last and how many loaves of bread you can make with it.

    #54781
    kymber
    Member

    oh MM – did you just say “the old fashioned way”? yer dead right sister! instead of time traveling to the future…we need to time travel to the past…we need to re-learn the ancient arts and skills that our ancestors did without thinking…it is in our DNA…its time to activate our ancient knowledge!

    #54782
    mmpaints
    Participant

    I t really is. I love it when people say “you can’t do that” well, why not, you wouldnt be here if your ancestors didnt do that.

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