long term survival

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 41 total)
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  • #54783
    kymber
    Member

    so true…oh man..i could really go on and on about this…i think you all have seen me post rather long responses on different threads…suffice it to say – we need to re-learn the ancient skills…our ancestors came before us and thrived…we need to redefine our definition of success!

    #54784
    Nickie
    Member

    I think floridarattlesnake has a good point– as the saying goes, “Don’t put all your eggs in one basket.” There’s really no way to know what sort of situation you may be preparing for, and your BOL might not be safe or accessible depending on what happens. It’s probably a good idea to have two or three places in mind in case you can’t use your BOL for any reason.


    @mmpaints
    wondering how people make it in the city– I am currently in a big city for college, and it’s completely true that if anything serious happened, I would be hard pressed to get out. I’ve been thinking about getting a motorcycle, something a bit more manueverable than my current car. Right now I just have my bicycle and an emergency backpack with enough to last me a week or two. I could probably pedal out of the city faster than I could drive 🙂

    #54785
    kymber
    Member

    Nickie – if yer a bicycle nut like my husband is you might enjoy reading these posts:

    http://novascotiapreppersnetwork.blogspot.com/2009/02/human-powered-vehicle-also-known-as.html” onclick=”window.open(this.href);return false
    http://novascotiapreppersnetwork.blogspot.com/2009/02/human-powered-vehicle-part-2-thanks-to.html” onclick=”window.open(this.href);return false
    http://newbrunswickpreppersnetwork.blogspot.com/2009_08_01_archive.html” onclick=”window.open(this.href);return false
    http://newbrunswickpreppersnetwork.blogspot.com/2009/08/human-powered-vehicle-part-4-other.html” onclick=”window.open(this.href);return false

    those posts are all about the bike! if you are interested, he has other posts about his other favourite obsession – “garbage pickin” (salvaging junk from other people’s garbage)!

    enjoy!

    #54786
    Nickie
    Member

    Thanks for the links! The bike trailer is fantastic. I’m not super handy, but I think I might look into building some extra storage on my bike.

    #54787
    idahobob
    Member

    @kymber wrote:

    Bob…you know that you are my hero …right?

    Blush!!

    Bob
    III

    #54788
    Wingnut
    Member

    We just recently moved to a house to ‘downsize’ from a more expensive home to a smaller one. Like Kymber spoke of, we used the equity to pay off debt, all but our mortgage. We have a 2 acre parcel that is lightly wooded on one edge. That side of the property borders a 12-15 acre hardwoods parcel that is not owned locally. I’ve never been a thief or poacher but if need be I will hunt it and work the timber as needed.

    We’ve done plenty of gardening over the years and you have to know what grows in your area. You can find that info at your state Department of Natural Resources, farm co-ops, or local gardening groups. Hey it’s great growing lemons in Maine, but your gonna have to expend alot of time/money/energy to do it. Instead walk around your property and see what you have. If you have wet heavy soil then find out what does well in it. If you have open, dry, windy areas find out what is hardy enough for that. If you get what grows well in your plot then grow it in abundance and do some horse trading later (of course make sure what you are growing is something someone else wants!).

    This spring we will put in four apple trees, which do well in our area. Apples are for us to eat, but spoiled or rotten ones can also be used to bait whitetail deer in a SHTF situation. We have started using heirloom seeds to save and hopefully start swapping when we have some abundance. Our garden this year will be a cross of veggies and herbs which I usually dry. This year I want to try canning, which I have never done since I watched my grandmother when I was a kid.

    Just some thoughts, I am still a newbie to prepping, but I have always been told as a gardener that you are wasting time and energy trying to plant crops that are not suited to your area.

    #54789
    Badrockbilly
    Member

    You are right Idaho Bob. I’ve always lived by the idea that if he can do it I can and our ancestors of thousands of years have faced a million hardships and we are their offspring. We are already survivors. The fist thing to overcome in self doubt.
    I worked on farms and ranches in Montana for a decade or two and learned that you can survive any weather if you are ready. I’ve laid down in a winter pasture amongst the cattle, their calves and frozen dung piles to break the wind. Looking up at the starry night waiting for a cow to drop her calf on a 20 below night and catching a nap. Lived in a tipi, lived in a bus, lived in a pickup camper, I have yet to camp in a brush and leaf pile but I wouldn’t turn it down as an option. They would throw me in jail for raising my kids like that today. I’ve also seen a three day blizzard that buried the neighbors cattle in a snow filled gully. The snow was three foot on the level with drifts that filled the buildings and went over the corrals. Making the right decision in the face of a storm can be life or death. During that blizzard a group of stranded motorists did just fine in a haystack. Montana ranchers have been working in the out of doors for a longtime. I would rather face any Montana storm rather than try surviving in the middle of a city when the ill prepared realize their plight. I would rather do without than go into debt , then again I dont have much but what I have I worked for honestly. I own a couple acres a few miles out of town and am trying to improve the garden every year. Learning which wild plants to eat. Buying the beans and bulk food through a buying club. I realise, what I have been preparing for for forty years cannot be duplicated overnight. After sixty years, I am still picking up new ideas and learning from others. Lessons from history and the Bible are a way to understand why and when people fail. Bill.

    #54790
    kymber
    Member

    Nickie – so glad that you liked the links – i thought that you might! and yes, extra storage for your bike is a good thing. i saw a guy going up the street with a milk carton attached to each side of his back wheels. i told the hubby about it and he thought it was brilliant!!!

    Bob – yer sooo freakin cute when ya blush – bahahahaha!

    Wingnut – yer not a thief or a poacher if no one catches you – winkwink! as for growing lemons in Maine i hear ya (and you do know that Canada considers Maine one of our provinces eh?). yer dead right about wasting time on crops that are not suited to your area – we all need to re-learn to eat locally and seasonally – it’s time to say goodbye to the avacadoes and pineapple! as for canning – last year was the first time that i canned – i was scared to death by the whole process – until i actually did it for real and realized that it wasn’t half as scarey as i made it out to be! there are canning specialists on this forum so don’t be afraid to ask questions k? you sound really cool and i am really glad that you are here!

    Badrockbilly – nice chatting with you the other night buddy! and just for your fyi – anyone that agrees with my hero Bob moves up a few notches in my good book – teehee! but you have it right on the money my friend! and it sounds like you got quite a few things figured out! the idea that you are still learning from others says much about your character! and we here at the APN Forum are always on the look-out for more “characters”!

    this forum feels like balm for my soul…i can’t believe all of the wonderful people who have found their way here. i can’t believe how much i am learning. you guys are the freakin best!

    #54791
    GreenGlove
    Member

    Woops, double post. 😳

    #54792
    GreenGlove
    Member

    ‘k. One of the things to look at besides canning, which requires jars, boilers and pressure cookers, is drying, even vegetables. Kimber, a book you may really appreciate is a reprint of “The Canadian Settler’s Guide” by Catherine Parr Traill. Yes that spelling is right. The one I have is a 1969 paperback that states in the front that it is a reprint of the 5th edition from 1855. I picked it up years ago in a used book store in Toronto. As a former resident of Ontario in the Kitchener-Waterloo area, I scoured the used book stores in TO until I found it. Talk about basics! Climate specific too. There is no ISBN number but it was published by McClelland and Stewart Ltd., with the number 0-7710-9164-8. It is Number 64 in a series printed for “The New Canadian Library”. The reason I put is forward here is the techniques are low tech, workable and there must be similar publications and documents available in other regions. The Foxfire series for the Southern Appalachian area has likely been discussed here, but I am new, and have not found those discussions yet. The old techniques work, and they are for the ‘long term’. 😉

    #54793
    KS-shoe
    Member

    I know something is going to happen but the question is what? How severe will it be?

    If the worst case scenario took place and you had to forage for food ( and in my case that’s foraging for 6!) your in real trouble. I say this not only because it would be really difficult to do so but the infrastructure of this country would have to be in complete ruins if you’re living off the land in order to keep your family going. Not to mention there will be other folks living off the folks who can live off the land. Disease would be brutal as well.

    I will say this and shut up, i think deep down, most of us want change, a change back to what made this country the power house it was and still could be. But we don’t know what this means. Is it a revolution with guns or is it a march on washington?

    #54794

    I have been a prepper long before it was popular I am afraid. I have always prepped just as a matter of living. At any given time we always have enough food and supplies for at least a year on hand. It has not always been easy but when you are raised as a child of a poor farmer you realize how important it is to the family to have enough food to go around no matter what happens.

    I now live in Texas in a intentional community which is just starting and growing faster than we planned really, we have folks from all over the country coming to live here permanently, all with their supplies and stores of food. We will be farming and raising our own beef, pork, rabbits, chickens etc and hopefully being totally self sufficient within a year. if the whole country crashed right now though we would be able to survive in good fashion except for the power part. We have not gotten totally off the grid yet but are working on it and I would bet that if we lost power tonight one of the guys would have something going by morning to get us what little power we actually need.

    I feel like everyone needs help in this, whether it is for security or safety or just company but we need each other. It is nice to sit with a cup of coffee and a good neighbor and discuss anything or everything. Good company will be as precious as food in our future.

    #54795
    idahobob
    Member

    @granny warrior wrote:

    I have been a prepper long before it was popular I am afraid. I have always prepped just as a matter of living. At any given time we always have enough food and supplies for at least a year on hand. It has not always been easy but when you are raised as a child of a poor farmer you realize how important it is to the family to have enough food to go around no matter what happens.

    I now live in Texas in a intentional community which is just starting and growing faster than we planned really, we have folks from all over the country coming to live here permanently, all with their supplies and stores of food. We will be farming and raising our own beef, pork, rabbits, chickens etc and hopefully being totally self sufficient within a year. if the whole country crashed right now though we would be able to survive in good fashion except for the power part. We have not gotten totally off the grid yet but are working on it and I would bet that if we lost power tonight one of the guys would have something going by morning to get us what little power we actually need.

    I feel like everyone needs help in this, whether it is for security or safety or just company but we need each other. It is nice to sit with a cup of coffee and a good neighbor and discuss anything or everything. Good company will be as precious as food in our future.

    Granny,

    Good on ya!! What y’all are doin’ there is something I have been trying to preach for quite a while!!

    Folks, if there is not an intentional type community, like the one granny describes here, where y’all are, start one. If nothing else, seek out like minded folks so you can start a MAG (mutual assistance group). When the excrement hits the revolving blade, we need to be standing together, supporting one another, watching each others backs. I do not believe that we can make it on our own, lone wolves get eradicated. I feel that time is getting short, but who knows how much time we really have?

    Granny, thank you for your wonderful post, and I sincerely hope that you bless us more with your presence. Do not be a stranger.

    Bob
    III

    #54796
    Uvajed
    Member

    @k-mcfar4 wrote:

    My concerns are more on a long-term basis. I am prepared in every fashion to provide for and protect my family for 60 days or so. After that it is hard to foresee the needs. I am prepared to leave the city and have located a remote, albeit humble, living quarters. However, in my Wyoming climate, remote can sometimes be deadly. Since I am convinced we will see the end of our society as we know it, should I be considering a relocation to a more moderate climate?

    Don’t discount your ability to survive in Wyoming. I personally believe, surviving a severe climate will be beneficial compared to the southern climes. Every novice will go south, the determined will go north. And like others said, network with like minded people you can TRUST!

    #54797
    kymber
    Member

    @GreenGlove wrote:

    ‘k. One of the things to look at besides canning, which requires jars, boilers and pressure cookers, is drying, even vegetables. Kimber, a book you may really appreciate is a reprint of “The Canadian Settler’s Guide” by Catherine Parr Traill. Yes that spelling is right. The one I have is a 1969 paperback that states in the front that it is a reprint of the 5th edition from 1855. I picked it up years ago in a used book store in Toronto. As a former resident of Ontario in the Kitchener-Waterloo area, I scoured the used book stores in TO until I found it. Talk about basics! Climate specific too. There is no ISBN number but it was published by McClelland and Stewart Ltd., with the number 0-7710-9164-8. It is Number 64 in a series printed for “The New Canadian Library”. The reason I put is forward here is the techniques are low tech, workable and there must be similar publications and documents available in other regions. The Foxfire series for the Southern Appalachian area has likely been discussed here, but I am new, and have not found those discussions yet. The old techniques work, and they are for the ‘long term’. 😉

    Greenglove – thanks so much for bringing this to my attention! i love old books for the knowledge that they contain and this one sounds like a must! i will try and get my hands on a copy!

    and you are so right – the old techniques are “long term”!

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