Looking for Info on Butter Churns

This topic contains 42 replies, has 29 voices, and was last updated by  Vetmike 2 years ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 43 total)
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  • #655

    rockl35
    Member

    Hi all. I am so new to this but I am trying to find a good butter churn. I am getting goats in the spring (new to that too! 😕 ) and wanting to make our butter. I want a good workable butter churn. I am not interested in how it looks I want something non electric that when the “it hits the fan” I can still use it. Any advice in this area would be greatly appreciated.

    thank you,
    Rachel
    (new kid on the block)

    #56118

    mmpaints
    Participant

    Rachel, you’re in luck in one way and not in another. Goats milk comes from the goat pre-homogenized. The butterfat doesn’t seperate like cows milk does. The butterfst molecules from goats milk are much smaller than that of a cow and stay suspended in the milk. You can make butter but a cream sperator is suggested and they’re kind of expensive. Once you get the butterfat off the milk, the making butter part is easy! you can use anything from a canning jar to an old ice cream maker to churn butter. Room temerature cream makes butter much quicker than cold cream does. I suggest looking on ebay for a butter churn, you can find good deals on them there.

    #56119

    Kailyst
    Member

    They have the non-electric kind at http://www.lehmans.com. It’s a GREAT place to find non-electric stuff and other great things!!!

    #56120

    mmpaints
    Participant

    Lehmans is a great place but i find their equipment to be very very expensive. Look at Hoegers goat supply beofre you spend money you don’t need to.

    #56121

    Hansel1
    Member

    The trick is to go visit Lehmans if you can and look at the eqipment you want, study it in detail. Go home and build one. Yours may not be as pretty but it will work just the same. Every one should regularly visit stores like Lehmans or other survivial stores to see how stuff is made. This way, in a real emergency you will have an idea how to improvise and build just what you need. Time well spend that could save your life later.

    John

    #56122

    mmpaints
    Participant

    That’s a good idea Hansel, no doubt. I am all for doing it myself and making itmyself. I’ve save countless dollars by building things myself. I’ve even built grain cleaners and such. A cream seperator would be difficult without a die and press and some other metal working tools tho. Can’t make one out of scrap lumber.

    #56123

    IceFire
    Moderator

    I remember my great-aunt use to separate the cream by straining it through a cloth. SHe didn’t have a cream separator. (then again, they didn’t have electricity, a telephine, or indoor plumbing, either!

    #56124

    tke1232
    Member

    Thank you for the info. I have been wondering where to purchase one also.

    #56125

    mr bill
    Member

    tke1232,
    PM me. I have a glass jar hand churn and some butter molds. Willing to trade.

    #56126

    IceFire
    Moderator

    @hansel1 wrote:

    The trick is to go visit Lehmans if you can …

    I’m going there the first of October! It’s on my way to my ladies’ outdoors weekend, so I’m going to leave REALLY early so I can get there when they open and have a couple of hours to spend there (I know, not NEARLY enough time, but I’ll take what I can get!)

    #56127

    walterc
    Member

    How do you separate cream by pouring it through a cloth? I’m trying to picture how it works, but I’m just coming up with milk all over the counter.

    #56128

    mmpaints
    Participant

    Walter, i aint got a clue. I just use an old sun tea jug. You know, the one with the spigot on the bottom? The cream settles on the top, you drain off the milk from the spigot. Works just fine for me. That won’t work for goats milk tho, the cream doesn’t separate.

    #56129

    IceFire
    Moderator

    @walterc wrote:

    How do you separate cream by pouring it through a cloth? I’m trying to picture how it works, but I’m just coming up with milk all over the counter.

    My aunt would pour the fresh milk (straight from the cow) from the bucket in to another bucket or bowl that had a cloth over it. The cloth acted as a strainer….the milk would pass through the cloth into the bowl/bucket, while the cream (from which the butter was made) would stay in the cloth. The cream was then put into the butter churn, and the skimmed milk was used for cooking and drinking.

    #56130

    IceFire- I kinda doubt that would work since the reason goats milk is naturally homogenized is the size of the fat globules. I suspect it would just slip right through.

    Hoegger has a cream separator for $389. Check your local thriftstores and craigslist. One popped up at our local goodwill for $15.

    #56131

    GooseArrow
    Member

    My Mom used the cloth method too. And to churn she just put it in a big glass jar and would shake it in her lap. We used to help her all the time as kids. Eventually she would get butter. I am sure a churn is much easier, but there are other alternatives.

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