Oil Lamps, Lamp Wicks & Lamp Oil

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  • #64429
    ReadyMom
    Moderator

    MERGed Posts Today

    #17199

    I bought 6 bottles, and 6 new wicks tonight at the store. Only had the intention of looking at some prepping stuff and came home with a bunch of stuff. My question is, how long is the shelf life. Its pure parafin (sp), clear not the blue stuff. Hopefully a long time, cuz I have a good supply for now. I may go back and get more, since its on sale.

    #18110
    zazzu
    Member

    Does anyone have any recommendations where to buy good hurricane lamp wicks at a good price?
    I just realized I have no spares at all. :shakeno:

    TIA

    #28605
    ArdisK70
    Member

    😮 Well, I got my new Fall Lehman’s catalogue in the mail yesterday. As I was going through it, I saw Olive Oil lamps that look similar to a canning jar. I thought, “Well, I have Olive Oil and I have canning jars.” I Googled Olive Oil lamps and found a homemade one from Mother Earth News, http://www.motherearthnews.com/Do-It-Yourself/Make-Olive-Oil-Lamp.aspx

    😉 Here’s the kicker! I couldn’t find my lamp wicks! Ok, what to do. If you have an old dish cloth (100% cotton), cut it in strips about 1/2 inch wide, or whatever your lamp wick uses. It worked like a charm. I will add that I don’t know how well it would work with regular lamp oil. I haven’t tried it yet, but I will.

    My lamp ran from 2:30 pm until I put it out about 9:30 pm. I estimate it used less than 2 Tablespoons of oil. BTW, I used a wide-mouthed pint canning jar.

    8) A couple of added benefits to using natural oils as opposed to petroleum based lamp oils is that there is no “flash point” and there is no odor. You can actually put the lamp out by sloshing the oil over the top of the flame.

    #29213
    Tybee
    Member

    Help! Advice needed! I have a glass hurricane lamp that, during an emergency, I had to fill with regular kerosene. It smoked so terribly, we had to sit it in the fireplace to “exhaust” the smoke during a recent power outage. This weekend I purchased smokeless lamp oil, and I want to replace the kerosene in the lamp.

    I can store the kerosene for future use, but what about the wick that is soaked with kerosene? Can I still use the same wick? Do I need to wash the kerosene out of the base? Can I just pour the lamp oil in there? Also, my husband came back with blue plastic bottles of Coleman kerosene that says it’s for hurricane lamps, but doesn’t say “smokeless”. The clear, unscented lamp oil I got says it will smoke if the flame is too high.

    Any advice will be greatly appreciated!

    #40308
    AuntBee
    Member

    Which of those two choices do people prefer? Which give better light? Which fuel burns longer? I have read that kerosene is cheaper and has excellent shelf life, but also that it is more dangerous to store than lamp oil, and definitely burns dirtier. On the other hand, kerosene lamps might be a better source of warmth.

    I’m sure this topic has been covered before, but I did not find the discussion. If it’s there and someone can point me to it, that would be great.

    Aunt Bee

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