Protecting your electronics

This topic contains 27 replies, has 12 voices, and was last updated by  The_blackenvelope 8 years, 3 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 28 total)
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  • #631

    Silent Bob
    Member

    I can’t say for sure that my shipping container will work , and I hope that I will never find out.
    Bob

    #55824

    Hansel1
    Member

    @rod wrote:

    Sometimes a ammo box with a desiccant pack will work well as a faraday cage but it should be lined with .25 inch plywood.

    It will work fine as long as there is good contact between the lid and the body not 50 layers of paint. 1/4 inch plywood is overkill actually as there is no potential difference within the container(puls can not reach in)
    In theory a DLC (diamond like coating) smaller then .01% of the thicknes of a hair would be sufficient if you don’t scratch it. But in practice, What I found works very well for small containers is to go to a bargain store and buy some cheap stick on tiles (12 of them for a buck) and line the inside of the container. With that you are having a material that is not only electrical insulating but also has the glue right attached to it.
    Of course several coats of non conductive paint and a brown paper bag will work too. It all depends how nice, sturdy and so on you want to make it. One important thing though. If you use a container like an ammo can or some of the military electrical equipment containers, make sure that (dependent on your location and the huminity there) you have something in it to absorb high huminity because you do not want your equipent to sit in there and rott away. I use the same stuff that is used in some of those silicone packs only it is made by a company that uses it to remove water from air and presurize antennas and cables with the dry air (Andrews). It comes in 1lb and bigger cans. I typically use 1-3 teaspoons of this in a container the size of a ammo box. I use a little piece from an old undeshirt, make a little sack poor it in and close it with a twist tie. Every 6 month or so (varies with your location) get it out, check the color of it and if it has changed put it into a backing pan and set it into a oven at the recommended temperature to get the water back out.It can be reused over and over. I have serveral items stored that way (in military equipment boxes) and it works well. For real long term storage..5,10,20,30 years and longer, one can buy the surplus military storage containers that have the valve assembly on it. Once everything is packed, fill the container with Nitrogen gas. That is easy and really cheap to do. Nitrogen is innert and can be used to store many items. Make sure you don’t exceede the max pressure of your container and make sure, you let the air bleed out for a prolonged time before you turn off the gas, there will never be any water or moist air inside the container and never any rust or rott as long as there is any nitrogen presure inside the box. A small 2000lbs nitrogen bottle ( it is small and the 2000lbs is not the weight of the bottle) will last you years and years and is cheap in comparison to other methods. I give a shot of nitrogen into any container I seal before closure just to make sure water is out. Be aware, if you live at an higher altitude and you plan to bug out to a lower altitude place the result will be that there is less pressure inside your containers and they will try to suck air. if that air is full of huminity because it happens to rain you may end up with spoiled , rotted or rusted goods.

    John

    #55825

    ReadyMom
    Moderator

    Oke … I’m hooked on this discussion. I’m reading ‘One Second After’. Googling ‘Farady Boxes’ and re-reading this thread. I’d like to know if you built your faraday box, gabbyhase. If you did, will you post about it and show photos?

    ‘sigh’ … is there NO end in sight for home prepping? 😕

    #55826

    Rod
    Member

    One Second After brought tears to my eyes both times I read it. I really think more vehicles would survive the EMP but I won’t bet on it. I would rather be surprised. :thumbsup:

    #55827

    Muzhik
    Member

    One thing that I’m trying to find out: I understand modern Diesel cars have a lot of electronics in them, BUT, in the case of an EMP could you still get one to turn over and run?

    #55828

    Empress
    Member

    don’t know anything about cars, but makes me think doing restoration is prepping. go figure. I need to find me an old car/truck. 🙂

    #55829

    Hansel1
    Member

    A video to watch is

    http://www.ebaumsworld.com/video/watch/834171/” onclick=”window.open(this.href);return false

    Now, there are some typical embellishments in some of the interviews but the main message is clear.
    The video was produced by Discovery and of course is done in the typical discovery fashion

    John

    #55830

    MTJoe
    Member

    I am so new to ham radio that I have moss behind my ears! I am getting my tech lic in april when the testing rolls around, and trying to decide what gear to buy. I want something that as I increase lic level I will be able to continue to use. Is there a radio out there that eill allow me to do that?

    #55831

    Rod
    Member

    Always depends on how much money you want to spend on a new hobby but as a tech you are going to want a 2 meter or a dual-band 2 meter/70 centimeter rig. These radios will give you good local service and are the mainstay of ARES communications. It always depends on your location and the surrounding terrain but the range of a 50 watt 2 meter radio can be extended 50 miles or so by using repeaters on duplex and much more than that by using linked repeater systems. There are 5 watt hand held radios in these bands as well as 50 watt mobile and base. Most active HAMs keep at least a mobile 2 meter radio either in a vehicle or hooked up in the shack because they are very portable and you never know when you may need to use that band. 2 meter J pole antennas are relatively small and easy to make either out of copper pipe or wire, tune with a swr meter and you are good to go, Get your self a yagi antenna and a antenna rotator and you extend your range by focusing your rf radiation in a particular direction, this means you can talk simplex farther or hit more distant repeaters. These are generally FM radios and you can spend more and get more by getting a all mode 2 meter or a tri band radio. You could also get a little bit of everything if you want to spend the money and if you want to study for the general class and take the general test the same day that you take the tech test. many people do that these days. There are some mobile dual band radios that have a repeater function and will act like a mini repeater. I got one of those and I can leave it on and hit it with a 5 watt hand held from inside a building and this mobile will then hit a regular repeater or I can leave my car sit on a hill and do the same thing while I am hiking or hunting in the woods. If you have auto-patch privileges on the repeater then you can even make a quick phone call, if there is a lot of activity it can also drain a car battery in a couple of hours.

    As you study for your test you will learn more of what is safe and possible under the FCC RULES and you will know more about what you want to do.

    Transmissions in these bands are very easy to locate(Direction Find) so you may want to keep that in mind as using them may make you very conspicuous when you think you are concealed.

    #55832

    MTJoe
    Member

    Great info Rod, thanks!

    #55833

    PreparedInTN
    Member

    For some of our hand-held communications gear, we use those green metal ammo cans like the military has – foam rubber for protection on the bottom and all around our hand-held items. Makes it easy to transport them and store them.

    #55834

    Rod
    Member

    @preparedintn wrote:

    For some of our hand-held communications gear, we use those green metal ammo cans like the military has – foam rubber for protection on the bottom and all around our hand-held items. Makes it easy to transport them and store them.

    A ammo box should work fine as long as there is a good electrical connection between the box and the lid and the electronics do not make contact with the metal box. The best way to make sure of this would be to connect a very flexible wire to both the lid and the box on the inside. If you weld a small bolt onto the inside of the lid and another on the box (where the hinge is spot-welded to the box and lid you have double thickness) to protect these connections and connect a multi-strand flexible wire you can insure this electrical connection. A big plus is the gasket sealed lid, you can slip a silica-gel pack in there to absorb any humidity. What ever you line the inside of the box with, be careful that it doesn’t ware off in time.
    The ammo boxes are a bit heavy but they are strong, almost airtight and have a good handle.
    There is a cat litter that contains silica-gel. Put some of this cat litter in your dehydrator for a hour or two in dry winter weather and then seal it up with your electronics, it will work very well to prevent corrosion on your sealed up electronics.

    #55835

    PreparedInTN
    Member

    Rod – yes, hubby has done a good job of making sure they have a good connection – funny you mentioned the cat litter – he was just telling someone about this on another forum board today!

    #55836

    Rod
    Member

    @mtjoe wrote:

    Great info Rod, thanks!

    You are welcome. I don’t know what you have for repeaters in your area but any local HAM operator will have an idea. There are even books that list and locate available HAM repeaters. One thing to keep in mind with repeaters is battery back-up. Some have it and some don’t.
    If you are a prepper you won’t be happy until you have some High Frequency privileges because with HF you can keep up with the national events and participate in the nets but you will still want to keep at least a 2 meter rig handy. 2 meters is more regional and it is easy to locate a transmitter, but it is more mobile because the antenna can be smaller, so post shtf you might want to keep moving, isolated, use the lowest power to do the job, and keep it short when transmitting on any VHF or UHF bands.
    You do not need to have a HAM license at all to hear what the HAMs are talking about on the long distance, high frequency, HAM bands but you do need to have a good short wave receiver with SSB capability and a very good (large) antenna. As long as you are just listening you are legal and hidden. If you are interested in these antennas just Google short wave antenna and you will find some very good antenna designs that anyone can build. The workhorse HAM bands for the daytime are 10 meters (around 28.900MHz) 20 meters (around 14.200 MHz) and and at night 40 meters (around 7.200 MHz), 75 meters (around 3.900 MHz), and 160 meters (around 1.900 MHz) the last three bands are susceptible to the static caused by lightning storms so they are quietest in the winter and 40 meters may be open for much of the day depending on solar flux. A lot of code is still used on the high frequency bands because lots of times it can be copied better over the distance.

    #55837

    Rod
    Member

    I have also heard that an old microwave oven should provide some protection from EMP. I don’t know how effective this might be and it would not be enough for me but I think it is better than nothing.

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