Rehydrating foods

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  • #622
    autumnwear
    Member

    I just started dehydrating this year and have been trying to utilize some of it lately for dinners and such, for practice as it were. Its not been rehydrating like ive been told it should. anyone have tips on rehydration of veggies? I know its supposed to b simple but im evidently complicating it somehow. 😕

    #55451
    IceFire
    Moderator

    I generally use my dehydrated veggies in soups and stews that need a long cooking time anyway. Make sure your water is plenty hot, and be prepared to let them cook AT LEAST an hour, and in some cases, two, depending on the density of the vegetable (Think of it like cooking dried beans, and you’ll get a good idea of the timeline involved.)

    #55452
    autumnwear
    Member

    wow….had no idea they’d take that long. good to know. thanks icefire

    #55453
    kymber
    Member

    thanks IceFire.

    #55454
    IceFire
    Moderator

    You’re all welcome. Experience is a GREAT teacher! (translation–I’ve had past experience with …um….”crunchy” rehydrated veggies….didn’t put them in until about45 minutes to an hour before the end of cooking, on a low “simmer”. Let’s just say I won’t be repeating THAT mistake!)

    #55455
    juju_mommy
    Member

    I’ve had a dehydrator for several years and only started using it about a year ago. I started out doing apples. But I uses these for snacks so no rehydrating needed. The next thing I did (and continue to do) is mushrooms. I love mushrooms, cook with them often, but don’t prefer the ones in the jar at the store. I tried dehydrating them and am very impressed! I use them in several ways, but most often on pizza. I usually put them in a glass of water and nuke in the microwave a couple of minutes then let sit in the hot water while I prepare the rest of the pizza. By the time I get done with it all and am ready to put on the pizza, they are plumped up. They never seem to get to pre-dehydrated size… but they loose that chewiness.

    #55456
    8greenbeans
    Member

    Interesting info on the mushrooms there juju ~

    I’m trying to make some different “mre” type packs (which I also like to take camping) and I came up with a form of “baked potatoes” but i’m finding reconciling the two things together difficult … let me explain … I’m packaging individual baggies with instant potatoes, a bit of salt, some “bacon bits” and wanted to put dehydrated broccoli in there too – but the re-hydration processes are different. For the potatoes you basically just add water, but for the broccoli, you’d have to cook for awhile. I guess I could put the serving of broccoli in a some plastic wrap or the like so that it doesn’t mix into the potato mixture so I could take them out and cook separately, then use the water where I re-hydrated the broccoli for the potatoes too … hope that all made sense cause I’m real tired and can’t seem to think straight!

    #55457
    Ldychef2k
    Member

    I made a really good soup-in-a-jar (plastic bag!) using dehydrated mushrooms, dehydrated leeks and celery, cooked and dehydrated rice, and a small bag of country gravy powder bought in bulk. Cooked the solids in water and milk until it was all rehydrated, then added the powdered gravy mix and boiled to thicken to taste. This is some awesome gourmet bugout food !

    #55458
    juju_mommy
    Member

    I LOVE the soup in a jar idea! I might “steal” that one. LOL. That would be useful for so many things: preps, camp outs, Christmas gifts…..

    #55459
    Ldychef2k
    Member

    That’s what I used it for at first, Christmas gifts. If you like spicy foods, you can make cream of potato with dehyudrated onions and jalapenos. Be careful, though, because the peppers get VERY hot. Using nonfat dry milk won’t cut the heat, you have to add some fat to do that. Anyway, I made it with dehydrated hash browns, peppers, and onions, cooked in a lot of liquid (used stock) until the potatoes fell apart, and then thickened with the country soup powder, which has a little fat in it. It was great with grilled chicken. You can also use it in a casserole.

    #55460
    IceFire
    Moderator

    My daughter and I did the “soup in a jar” thing for several Christmas gifts this year. We layered chicken soup base (you could use beef or other soup bases), dehydrated onion, spinach noodles, rice, dehydrated veggies, barley, parsey and celery flakes, plain noodles, garlic powder, and pepper in quart-size jars. You just had to put the jar contents in a pot with 12 cups of water (the noodles, rice, and barley soak up a LOT of the water), and if you want, add about a cup (or can) of cooked, cut-up chicken, then let it simmer another 45 minutes.

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