Survival Guns

This topic contains 107 replies, has 58 voices, and was last updated by  arielado 4 years, 2 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 108 total)
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  • #53964

    koeelvry
    Participant

    I have also seen revolvers jam. Residue between the cylinder and barrel, high primers, and short stroking the trigger are the most common. Just like anything else, keep it clean, use good ammo, pay attention to the basic fundamentals of shooting,and you’ll have fewer problems. It doesn’t matter if it’s a wheel gun or auto.

    #53965

    I used a Colt Python 4″ as back-up until my cousin, in the Marines at the time, offered me a challenge. Yep, it was the mud pit and he had a 1911.

    No, I never tossed my wheel gun in and yes went with a .45 Combat Commander after that.

    While I now like the new Springfield XD/XDM with a 13 + 1 capacity in the 4 and 5 inch, I still keep that 1911 handy.

    And for my two cents on wheel guns jamming, there can be a timing problem in cylinder rotation/line up with the firing pin. Rare, but I have seen it happen often enough in magnum calibers, both S&W and Colt, to consider it a problem. Especially if the revolver is trained with seriously each week using magnum rounds.

    JM

    #53966

    Lionheart1972
    Participant

    Great topic and one of my favorites. I have read hundreds of opinions on this subject so I will approach this discussion from a different angle. Whatever firearm or combination you choose, you should always think beyond the gun. Think also about gun, ammo, magazines, holster, or sling as a team or a system. As a former LEO, I have had the benefit of much training and practice with my weapons, ammo and gear. I also take great care in selecting magazines, ammo pouches, scopes and slings. Selecting your survival gun (or guns) is just the start of the survival gun process. Choose carefully.

    Here is one of my biggest recommendations, DON”T make decisions selecting firearms by only talking to salesmen. There job is to sell stuff, that doesn’t mean they will always take your personal needs and situation as a priority. Sure you can get suggestions from the kindly sales folks, but better yet, ask a friend or even a friend of a friend who is gun smart.

    Additionally, if you have never fired your weapon under stressful conditions you will find shooting and reloading a new challange. Practice. Those who choose revolvers, reloading under stress is very difficult and like shooting is a deminishing skill. Unjamming a firearm under stress is another critical skill needed to practiced and learned. Shooting in low light conditions is still another consideration. Ammo selection is also important to match to the gun, and at what you plan to shoot. And finally, if you can afford professional firearms training I strongly recommend you do it.

    #53967

    @lionheart1972 wrote:

    Great topic and one of my favorites. I have read hundreds of opinions on this subject so I will approach this discussion from a different angle. Whatever firearm or combination you choose, you should always think beyond the gun. Think also about gun, ammo, magazines, holster, or sling as a team or a system. As a former LEO, I have had the benefit of much training and practice with my weapons, ammo and gear. I also take great care in selecting magazines, ammo pouches, scopes and slings. Selecting your survival gun (or guns) is just the start of the survival gun process. Choose carefully.

    Excellent points sir, excellent indeed and they drive home a very important fact that no one person can do everything.

    Yes, we all can gain basic experience in shooting/reloading and survival gardening, and hunting/trapping/fishing, and communication, and vehicle maintenance down to building a wood gasifier, and field surgery, and…

    No.

    One person can be a generalist at many things, but never expert in all. Granted there are the exceptions, usually seen on Discovery, History, and National Geographic programs, but the rest of us who struggle to work daily jobs, take care of important duties, pay the bills and lots more, have very little free time left to do more than become generally aware, a few of us generally capable, in most of the things we discuss here.

    Not knocking anybody and guess I have too much “spare time” on my hands right now, but to me it all comes down to group organizations. As far back as the anthropology experts can go, man has been confirmed a group organism, not a Jeremiah Johnson type.

    So out of necessity we have “professionals” who specialize in one or possibly two skills, but not all. This group aspect is essential for a SHTF or any other scenario we all can envision. Guess the fact I am having increasing difficulty seeing iron sights, even with glasses, that used to be so simple and my body will no longer do the drills necessary to survive close quarters combat, is bothering me some right now.

    So, Lionheart, your points are sound and logical and one can only pray in the great game of life, whatever group they happen to fall into has a whole bunch of young bucks, both he and she, that can still change that mag without dropping it when blue tracer’s are flying past their head, dirt is spraying into their face, and they can’t use their shooting hand because someone else just shredded it.

    :gunshooting:

    You know, we really need a tactical nuke icon for this group, for I agree with Ripply – “Nuke the site from orbit, its the only way to be sure.”

    JM

    #53968

    Titan77
    Member

    I am certainly glad i read these posts. I have been in much personal deliberation as to rather my next gun purchase should be a shotgun(12 or 20 awg) or a rifle (30-06 or higher caliber). I presently own a ruger 10/22 and have a 9mm handgun. After reading this post I have decided on a shotgun as my next purchase

    #53969

    Lionheart1972
    Participant

    Good choice Titan. For the price and versitility a good shotgun can’t be beat, and it will be a fantastic addition to your survival guns. If I might offer a recommendation, I like the Remmington 870. It is affordable, dependable and repair parts are readily available. The 870 is a workhorse of a gun and it is the choice for many, many law enforcement agencies.

    #53970

    snipertec
    Member

    I advise my customers to buy one of the North American Arms deringers. They are small but can be carried in your front pocket without anyone knowing that it is there. Most males have at least one hand in a pocket when they are not doing something. This puts the gun in your hand when you need it. If an attack comes the person will not notify you from a distance that he is going to attack you. It will be up close and personal. The gun that is literally in your hand is the one that CAN be used. The motions needed to grab your main gun in an inside waistband holster take time – time that you would not have. I carry my PUG deringer even when I have a bigger handgun on me just for this reason.

    The other nice thing about these is that you can carry them with you when nothing else can be hidden.

    As far as wilderness survival I rely on a .22 rifle. There are many good ones out there. Too many to have an absolute favorite but I do rely on the 10/22 most of the time. I just got a T/C Hotshot which could give my M6 survival rifle some competition on light weight.

    .45 auto is my choice for a defense handgun but I usually carry a revolver if I am in the woods.

    12 gauge for home defense.

    #53971
    snipertec wrote:
    I advise my customers to buy one of the North American Arms deringers. They are small but can be carried in your front pocket without anyone knowing that it is there. Most males have at least one hand in a pocket when they are not doing something. This puts the gun in your hand when you need it. If an attack comes the person will not notify you from a distance that he is going to attack you. It will be up close and personal. The gun that is literally in your hand is the one that CAN be used. The motions needed to grab your main gun in an inside waistband holster take time – time that you would not have. I carry my PUG deringer even when I have a bigger handgun on me just for this reason.

    The other nice thing about these is that you can carry them with you when nothing else can be hidden.

    Good point.

    What’s your take on the Bond Arms Snake Charmer model? The one that takes either .45 Long Colt or the .410 shotgun 3″ Mag shell?

    Kinda big framed for a pocket piece, but that .410 OOO buck would be excellent for close in snake work.

    JM

    #53972

    snipertec
    Member

    Bond Arms makes some nice guns but they are heavy. Recoil is also “noticeable” 😉 Would make a nice snake gun though.

    Might be a little hard to conceal here in the summer in south Georgia though.

    #53973

    ke4sky
    Member

    Derringers are inaccurate beyond about 20 feet and only have two shots.

    Personally, I don’t want anything threatening to get in that close.

    For defense a snubby revolver is a much better choice.

    For survival you want a full sized gun accurate to 25 yards or more.

    #53974

    After re-reading all these posts, it simply reminds me that practicing your “failure drills” is critical. a .22 to 50 cal is capable of a failure of some sort. The key to staying in the fight or hunt is to know the weapon, know the failure drills for the weapon and staying focused on either the target or the drill in it’s entirety.

    Failure drills fail mostly when the shooter fails to remain focused on the task at hand, IE if you have a jam, stay focused on the failure drill to clear the problem in an expoditious manner, rather then trying to track the target AND clear the jam.

    Sadly ive seen some very concerning things happen under duress. I once watched a deputy load a mini 14 mag backwards while we were taking fire. How he did it defy’s logic. To say the least I was pretty focused on the problem and noticed this goober beating the heck out of his mag. I thought he was doing a tap rack bang drill . When it was over, He asked me if I could figure out why the Mini would not fire. He held the rifle up and the mag curve was facing backwards.

    I needed some humor about then, I laughed so hard I had tears in my eye’s. This young deputy was pretty distraught over the mag thing and almost quit. He was a good young troop and we worked with him to become a gun guy. The happy ending is that he’s still in the business and a very competent weapons handler, and now a range master.

    He starts every training session by telling the story of how he was able to seat a mini 14 mag in the rifle backwards. The 2nd point being don’t let a drill failure kill your spirit. Learn from the mistake and move thru it.

    Dirk Williams

    #53975

    snipertec
    Member

    @ke4sky wrote:

    Derringers are inaccurate beyond about 20 feet and only have two shots.

    Personally, I don’t want anything threatening to get in that close.

    For defense a snubby revolver is a much better choice.

    For survival you want a full sized gun accurate to 25 yards or more.

    I totally agree. My comments on the deringer were for “street survival”. A threat on the street may not telegraph his intent until he is right on top of you. The purpose of the deringer is that it is carried in your front pocket. if you are like most american males you stand with your hands in your pocket so the deringer is always next to your gun hand. Even when I am carrying a larger handgun I carry the 5 shot deringer in my front pocket.

    Those of us who live in the south have a hard time concealing a firearm depending on the season. A deringer can always be concealed even if you are wearing a swim suit.

    I carry a few different guns depending on circumstances. open carry is easy – my 1911 which I got in 1972. S&W 638 or kel-tec P3AT at other times. The point is that you should have at least one gun on you at all times – two is better.

    In a wilderness survival situation I would probably be carrying a revolver such as the S&W 686 or a Ruger Redhawk.

    #53976

    ke4sky
    Member

    Thx. for the clarification. Inside 20 ft. the 5 pellet 00 buck gives you better hit probability and ALOT more energy on target than dumping a load of .32 ACP hardball from a Keltec. Have found most people can carry a concealed hammer .38 snub in a Desantis Nemesis on strong side in the front pocket and it works fine as long as you wear loose clothing, not jeans. If you wear close cut trousers an IWB with reinforced top opening such as El Paso C-Force is much better. This will hide even a full sized M1911 under a T-shirt if you learn lift-rip-draw technique.

    #53977

    sbsion
    Member

    I got rid of everything but, my .22, and that’s for the “local” wildlife…….hmmmmmmm

    #53978

    @ke4sky wrote:

    Thx. for the clarification. Inside 20 ft. the 5 pellet 00 buck gives you better hit probability and ALOT more energy on target than dumping a load of .32 ACP hardball from a Keltec. Have found most people can carry a concealed hammer .38 snub in a Desantis Nemesis on strong side in the front pocket and it works fine as long as you wear loose clothing, not jeans. If you wear close cut trousers an IWB with reinforced top opening such as El Paso C-Force is much better. This will hide even a full sized M1911 under a T-shirt if you learn lift-rip-draw technique.

    Besides the standard derringer, there is one other pistol for the absolute last resort on the street or any other real close encounter. Its called the Compact Off-duty Patrolman (COP) Although it has not been produced in years, it can still be found at gun shows if you take time to look.

    Basically a stainless four barrel, two over/two under, one inch barrel, double action with internal rotating hammer (yes, 4 firing pins) derringer in .38 special/.357 mag. Granted the trigger pull is really stiff and testing confirmed the bullets keyhole after 10 feet, but within that range all will stay well inside the outer ring (think pie plate) if you practice a lot. And in this case all you want is all four center mass real quick.

    The barrel is classed at one inch, although the break open itself is around two inches (2+1=3 total inches) there is only about one inch of barrel beyond each bullet nose. It does have rifling, but not certain how effective.

    That and in low light conditions, expect to have a huge flash after each shot.

    On the good side, although they never made a holster for it that I know of, it will fit nicely inside the front pocket of “relaxed fit” jeans and none the wiser. Just make certain you have your CCP at the time.

    Anyway, more later.

    JM

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