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Guinea pigs as livestock??????

Livestock discussions including other discussions such as poultry, fish farms and beekeeping.

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Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

Postby DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE » Sat Apr 01, 2017 9:33 am

RollingwithR wrote:Wow thanks for the great info kappydell your info got my wife finally signed on 100% with the whole idea it was the tip about the babies having fur that really tipped her, I really like the one month breeding mark. So I'm going to start looking for babies. You sound like you have done this before, I've been doing my own research online and your info seams dead on thanks Any suggestions on where to buy some breading guinea pigs or what bread? I know I don't want anything long haired but that's about it. Lol can you imagine the looks were going to get at petco! Asking about the different bread characteristics? Not like that will stop me from doing it but if anyone has a better suggestion for stock procurement please share! I've got a bunch of spring projects started already but this has been added to list now. I have to build a new hutch and pen and everything so it might be a couple months out yet but keep an eye on this thread I will post pics of new hutch and my whole "mini piggy farm" that's what we're calling this little endeavor btw. Thanks again



OK...now this is getting interesting. Going to bookmark this Rolling...I'm very interested in your startup notes/progress/pics.

I know almost nothing on breeding of anything for self-sustainment except some personal research on cattle and chickens...No practical experience in any way so, ya, almost nothing.(My city wont even let me keep chickens as pets)

Just curious here.... Can you eat only guinea pigs as a meat diet or is there the real issue there of Protein poisoning like with rabbit?(Rabbit starvation)


lol...This is for sure the weirdest subject to grab my attention in a while...lol...open minds are always willing to break from social convention and be the stronger for it. I wonder if this is my way in around city ordinances.....Hmmmmm.....If they don't make a lot of noise how would my neighbors or city officials even find out?
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Postby rebnavy1862 » Fri Apr 07, 2017 4:00 pm
Driven, are you sure you are from Kalifornia? You make a lot of sense.
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Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

Postby Cast Iron » Sat Apr 01, 2017 9:36 am

DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE wrote:
RollingwithR wrote:Wow thanks for the great info kappydell your info got my wife finally signed on 100% with the whole idea it was the tip about the babies having fur that really tipped her, I really like the one month breeding mark. So I'm going to start looking for babies. You sound like you have done this before, I've been doing my own research online and your info seams dead on thanks Any suggestions on where to buy some breading guinea pigs or what bread? I know I don't want anything long haired but that's about it. Lol can you imagine the looks were going to get at petco! Asking about the different bread characteristics? Not like that will stop me from doing it but if anyone has a better suggestion for stock procurement please share! I've got a bunch of spring projects started already but this has been added to list now. I have to build a new hutch and pen and everything so it might be a couple months out yet but keep an eye on this thread I will post pics of new hutch and my whole "mini piggy farm" that's what we're calling this little endeavor btw. Thanks again



OK...now this is getting interesting. Going to bookmark this Rolling...I'm very interested in your startup notes/progress/pics.

I know almost nothing on breeding of anything for self-sustainment except some personal research on cattle and chickens...No practical experience in any way so, ya, almost nothing.(My city wont even let me keep chickens as pets)

Just curious here.... Can you eat only guinea pigs as a meat diet or is there the real issue there of Protein poisoning like with rabbit?(Rabbit starvation)


lol...This is for sure the weirdest subject to grab my attention in a while...lol...open minds are always willing to break from social convention and be the stronger for it. I wonder if this is my way in around city ordinances.....Hmmmmm.....If they don't make a lot of noise how would my neighbors or city officials even find out?


The smell.
IF their urine smell that is.
Of all my livestock, I think the rabbits are the most odorous.
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Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

Postby IceFire » Sat Apr 01, 2017 10:52 pm

Cast Iron wrote:The smell.
IF their urine smell that is.
Of all my livestock, I think the rabbits are the most odorous.


Rabbits smell....furry.

If you want a truly SMELLY livestock animal, the prize HAS to go to a goat buck. Does (the girls) and wethers (castrated males) as well as YOUNG intact males DO NOT stink. However, once the hormones start raging in an intact male goat (ESPECIALLY when he's in rut) the stench is AWFUL! Not only do THEY stink, but that "funky" smell will also get on the OTHER goats in the herd, as well. Once the breeding job is done, the best place for a "billy" goat is far, FAR away from everybody else!
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Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

Postby Cast Iron » Sun Apr 02, 2017 9:43 am

IceFire wrote:
Cast Iron wrote:The smell.
IF their urine smell that is.
Of all my livestock, I think the rabbits are the most odorous.


Rabbits smell....furry.

If you want a truly SMELLY livestock animal, the prize HAS to go to a goat buck. Does (the girls) and wethers (castrated males) as well as YOUNG intact males DO NOT stink. However, once the hormones start raging in an intact male goat (ESPECIALLY when he's in rut) the stench is AWFUL! Not only do THEY stink, but that "funky" smell will also get on the OTHER goats in the herd, as well. Once the breeding job is done, the best place for a "billy" goat is far, FAR away from everybody else!


Thank you very much for that information.

I am actually looking at getting a buck this week.
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Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

Postby IceFire » Sun Apr 02, 2017 8:43 pm

Cast Iron wrote:Thank you very much for that information.

I am actually looking at getting a buck this week.


Make sure you keep him well downwind! When we brought our little buckling home, he stank from the two bucks in the herd. After a couple of days, however, the "billy goat funk" was gone (thankfully) Once the hormones kick in, however, the stank will return. Bucks have two sets of "scent" glands...one set where you'd expect it...near the "nether portions." To make sure that their scent will "surround" them so as to attract the "ladies", a buck will pee on the backs of his front legs, as well as on his beard! The OTHER billy goat scent glands are located at the back of the head, behind the horns. Those scent gland pretty much are inactive until a buck goes into rut. Then the stink will begin. A wether (castrated male) will NOT develop the stink as long as you get the deed done BEFORE he gets old enough to develop those hormones.

If you do decide to castrate a buckling, it is really easy. There is a tool that has 4 prongs, over which you place the bands. Then, just open it up to stretch the band, then place it over the sac, close to the body (just make sure that you don't catch the vestigial teats in there) close it enough to get the band off the prongs, and that's it. The band will cut off the circulation, to the testicles, and in a couple of weeks, they will fall off (much like a baby's umbilical cord does.) The best thing about that method is that you don't have the risk of infection like you would if they were cut off. He'll just walk a little funny for a few days. :p
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Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

Postby kappydell » Wed Apr 05, 2017 2:30 am

I stand on my "don't ask, don't tell" rule when purchasing certain items...like feed store grains for human consumption, or "pets" as protein. I'm told rats taste like squirrel....makes sense they are all rodents......one cuy is generally one serving in a South American restaurant, weight varies.
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Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

Postby kappydell » Wed Apr 05, 2017 3:01 am

From the Andean mountains

Since cuys are small, recipes call for one per person, unless the meat is cut into smaller portions. Most often, the cuy is split apart and cooked whole, with the head still attached.

A typical recipe for baked or barbequed cuy with a hot sauce:
3 or 4 cuys
50 grams of ground toasted corn, or cornmeal
2 kilos of parboiled potatoes, cut in slices
8 cloves of garlic
6 fresh hot peppers, either red or yellow
½ cup oil
½ cup water
salt, pepper and cumin to taste
Rub the cuys with a mix of the pepper, salt, pepper and cumin and bake. You can also skewer over a barbeque.
Prepare a sauce with the oil, peppers, garlic and cornmeal with the water from the potatoes or broth. Cook a few minutes until the peppers are cooked. When tender, place the meat in a serving dish and spoon the sauce over it. Serve with the boiled potatoes.
Another recipe calls for:
4 cuys
1 teaspoon hot pepper
1 tablespoon pisco (hot sauce)
garlic to taste
6 fresh hot peppers, either red or yellow
1/4 cup oil
salt, pepper to taste Season the cleaned cuys with salt, pepper, hot pepper and pisco. Fry in oil five minutes or until cooked.
Serve with a hot pepper sauce, potatoes, either fried or boiled and a salad of cucumber, tomato, lettuce and onion.

roasted cuy
2 lrg animals
marinade
2 x red onions, minced
4 x cloves of garlic, minced
2 tsp cumin
1 tsp white pepper
2 tsp of salt
2 Tbsp. water
2 Tbsp. oil
pinch  annatto (for coloring)
to rub on before roasting: 2 Tbsp. lard
dipping sauce:
more  annatto coloring
2 x white onions, minced
2 x cloves garlic
salt
healthy pinch of cumin
1 lrg cup. of roasted and grnd coffee
peanuts
3 1/2 c. lowfat milk
Directions
Mix ingredients well and spread over the inside and outside of the animal. Allow to marinate for up to one day to allow flavors to meld. Before roasting, remove excess marinade to avoid scalding. The spit should be inserted into the back part of the animal and exit from the jaw. Once on the stick, tie the front and back feet, stretching out the legs. Put on grill, turning manually. Continue to apply lard to the skin to avoid drying out the meat. The cuy is ready when the skin is close to bursting. Serve with boiled potatoes sprinkled with coriander, chilies, and the peanut sauce. If your community is especially progressive, rice may be substituted for the potatoes.
Peanut Dipping Sauce: Fry onions till golden, then add in other ingredients. Cook at low heat for at least half an hour.

fibbing cuy (so called because the Peruvian cook couldn't find cuy in the US so he used rabbit and cooked by the cuy recipe (he didn't know where to look)
Ingredients
1 rabbit, 3 1/2 to 4 1/2 lb (1.5 to 2 kg), cut into serving pieces
 
Marinade
4 cloves garlic, crushed
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon dried oregano
2 tablespoons olive oil
 
Braise
2 tbsp olive oil
1 red onion, finely chopped
1 tablespoon Amarillo Chile Paste
1 tablespoon Panca Chile Paste
7 tablespoons (100 ml) white wine
1 cup (250 ml) good-quality chicken stock
1/3 cup (50 g) roasted peanuts, ground
12 new potatoes
1 tablespoon finely chopped flat-leaf parsley
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
Directions
1.
Put the rabbit pieces in a bowl. Mix the marinade ingredients together in a bowl and use your hands to massage the marinade into the rabbit pieces, making sure they are well covered. Season with salt and pepper and leave to marinate for at least a couple hours.
2.
Heat the olive oil in a Dutch oven over medium heat. Fry the rabbit pieces on all sides until evenly browned. Remove the rabbit from the pan with a slotted spoon and add the onion. Sauté the onion until translucent and then add the chile pastes. Cook for a further couple minutes and then deglaze the pan with the white wine. Scrape vigorously to make sure nothing is sticking and then add the stock. Return the pieces of rabbit to the pan. Cover and simmer over low heat for about 1 hour.
3.
Meanwhile, boil the potatoes in plenty of water until they are firm but tender inside. Drain, and when cool enough to handle, cut the potatoes in half crosswise.
4.
Stir in the peanuts and leave to simmer uncovered for a further 30 minutes, until the sauce has thickened and the rabbit is very tender. Add the potatoes and leave them to heat through. Serve sprinkled with the parsley.

Methods of Making Cuy Recipes
• Frying – This is quite acceptable method for making cuy dishes. This cooking method is also known as Frito or choctado.
• Broiling – This is the best method adopted for making cuy recipes. Broiling makes the meat tender as well as retains the juices.
• Roasting – Al horno or roasting is the traditional cooking method for cuy.
• Baking – This is the most contemporary method of making this meat and highly adopted in urban restaurants.
• Barbequing – Huatia is the term given to this cooking process and it is highly recommended for cuy cooking. Barbeque cuy recipes are popularly served corn beer.

Cuisines Commonly Making Cuy Recipes
Andean highland is the main region where cuy is fondly eaten as one of the varieties of meat. Peruvian and Bolivian cuisines are highly famous for using this meat in their regular as well as ceremonial dishes.

Buying and Storing of Cuy (in Bolivia)
Cuy can easily be procured from the local meat shops and if needed in bulk then municipal fairs in Andes are the good option. Like other meats, this meat should also be fresh. The appearance of this meat is quiet similar to rabbit meat or dark chicken flesh.
It can be stored in freezer if storage period is longer. Prepared dishes can either be stored in refrigerator it freezer and should be consumed with in 2-3 days.

Health Facts Related to Cuy Recipes
Protein content is quiet high in cuy meat and it is relatively lower in fat and cholesterol.



You might say I specialize in odd recipes.......
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Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

Postby Wallimiyama » Wed Apr 05, 2017 9:39 am

I've had Cuy in Peru and Brazil...

It's pretty darned tastey. It has a higher fat content than rabbit... a definite plus, and tastes quite a bit like pork...not chicken... hence the Guinea "PIG".
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Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

Postby Cast Iron » Wed Apr 05, 2017 10:06 am

IceFire wrote:
Cast Iron wrote:Thank you very much for that information.

I am actually looking at getting a buck this week.


Make sure you keep him well downwind! When we brought our little buckling home, he stank from the two bucks in the herd. After a couple of days, however, the "billy goat funk" was gone (thankfully) Once the hormones kick in, however, the stank will return. Bucks have two sets of "scent" glands...one set where you'd expect it...near the "nether portions." To make sure that their scent will "surround" them so as to attract the "ladies", a buck will pee on the backs of his front legs, as well as on his beard! The OTHER billy goat scent glands are located at the back of the head, behind the horns. Those scent gland pretty much are inactive until a buck goes into rut. Then the stink will begin. A wether (castrated male) will NOT develop the stink as long as you get the deed done BEFORE he gets old enough to develop those hormones.

If you do decide to castrate a buckling, it is really easy. There is a tool that has 4 prongs, over which you place the bands. Then, just open it up to stretch the band, then place it over the sac, close to the body (just make sure that you don't catch the vestigial teats in there) close it enough to get the band off the prongs, and that's it. The bank will cut off the circulation, to the testicles, and in a couple of weeks, they will fall off (much like a baby's umbilical cord does.) The best thing about that method is that you don't have the risk of infection like you would if they were cut off. He'll just walk a little funny for a few days. :p


Ok.
Now I get the smell.

The upside, he is already trying to service two of the girls.
This is what we bought him for so all is well.
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Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

Postby IceFire » Wed Apr 05, 2017 9:02 pm

Cast Iron wrote:
IceFire wrote:
Cast Iron wrote:Thank you very much for that information.

I am actually looking at getting a buck this week.


Make sure you keep him well downwind! When we brought our little buckling home, he stank from the two bucks in the herd. After a couple of days, however, the "billy goat funk" was gone (thankfully) Once the hormones kick in, however, the stank will return. Bucks have two sets of "scent" glands...one set where you'd expect it...near the "nether portions." To make sure that their scent will "surround" them so as to attract the "ladies", a buck will pee on the backs of his front legs, as well as on his beard! The OTHER billy goat scent glands are located at the back of the head, behind the horns. Those scent gland pretty much are inactive until a buck goes into rut. Then the stink will begin. A wether (castrated male) will NOT develop the stink as long as you get the deed done BEFORE he gets old enough to develop those hormones.

If you do decide to castrate a buckling, it is really easy. There is a tool that has 4 prongs, over which you place the bands. Then, just open it up to stretch the band, then place it over the sac, close to the body (just make sure that you don't catch the vestigial teats in there) close it enough to get the band off the prongs, and that's it. The bank will cut off the circulation, to the testicles, and in a couple of weeks, they will fall off (much like a baby's umbilical cord does.) The best thing about that method is that you don't have the risk of infection like you would if they were cut off. He'll just walk a little funny for a few days. :p


Ok.
Now I get the smell.

The upside, he is already trying to service two of the girls.
This is what we bought him for so all is well.


It's great that he's already trying to do what you bought him for. One other thing...if you plan on milking the does after the kids are born, then DEFINITELY keep the buck well downwind...the "billy goat funk" can actually taint the milk. That's why goat milk frequently tastes funky. If you watch what the girls eat (I give mine alfalfa and a grain mix of wheat, oats, milo, and sunflower seed) they are a breed with a high butterfat content (LaManchas and Nubians have a good butterfat content) and keep the buck far, FAR away from the girls, the milk should just taste like really rich cows milk. "Funky" taste is a good indication that the buck is in too close proximity. Unless, of course, you LIKE the taste of billy goat funk.... :p
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Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

Postby whitebear54 » Sat Jul 08, 2017 3:30 pm

IceFire wrote:
oldasrocks wrote:Too close to being a rat to interest me. I'll stick with chickens. Duel purpose that way.


Same here...Guinea pig is just WAY too much like a rat. Chickens, at least, are dual purpose...eggs as well as meat. Plus, I already HAVE the chickens!


I'm with you, Ice. If I want to eat rats we have desert packrats aplenty. But until my hand is forced, I'll stick to rabbits and chickens.
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Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

Postby DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE » Thu Sep 14, 2017 1:25 am

just revisited this thread...lol...good stuff. :rofl:
In honor of RebNavy...RIP buddy. You made me smile. :)

Postby rebnavy1862 » Fri Apr 07, 2017 4:00 pm
Driven, are you sure you are from Kalifornia? You make a lot of sense.
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Semper Fi, Sic Semper Tyrannis, Remember The Alamo, and Aide'toi et Dieu T'aidera!
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