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keeping warm

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keeping warm

Postby Wingnut » Wed Jan 06, 2010 7:41 pm

On another thread I had mentioned about having access to goose down that I could start saving and I wanted to ask and expand on that.

Does anyone save/store goose down? If so what do you keep it in? Also, since I know nothing about sewing, what would you put it into to make, say, a down blanket?

Lets go even farther about what thoughts you all may have about how to prepare hides (whitetail, rabbit etc) for personal use. My understanding is you have to dry and stretch it at the same time, but for how long? Do you have to treat it with something to keep it pliable?

Thanks for any info.
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Re: keeping warm

Postby IceFire » Wed Jan 06, 2010 8:58 pm

I don't know what one would store down in, but I DO sew and quilt, and can help you out with a blanket. For making a down blanket, you will need both a top and bottom layer of fabric. You will want something with a fairly tight weave, as down has a BAD habit of finding the spaces in the weave and working itself out. put the layers of fabric together, with the right sides facing in, and stitch down one long side, the adjacent short side, and up the other long side. Leave one short side open to form a fabric "envelope". Reach up through the open side and turn the envelope right side out. You will bee filling this envelope with the down, but not all at once, or you will end up with it all clumped together at the bottom. fill the bottom couple of inches of the bag with down...make sure that it is equally distributed. Stitch across the width of the bag to "seal" that section. repeat the process of filling and stitching until you get to the top of the bag. After you have stitched the top of the bag closed, then stitch down the length of the bag, placing lines of stitches a couple of inches apart. This will keep the down from shifting and bunching up in one area. Voila! You now have a down comforter!
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Re: keeping warm

Postby Wingnut » Thu Jan 07, 2010 8:02 am

Thanks Icefire
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Re: keeping warm

Postby IceFire » Thu Jan 07, 2010 1:13 pm

Glad to help, Wingnut...sewing and quilting are some favorite pastimes of mine. You can also use the same type of process for making down-filled clothing items...you just need to cut both an outer fabric layer and a lining layer--cut a little larger than normal, to allow for the extra bulk of the down, and the "quilting", and then do the "fill and stitch" technique to keep the down where you want it to be.
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Re: keeping warm

Postby Wingnut » Thu Jan 07, 2010 5:20 pm

I'm gonna get some scrap fabric and a small sewing kit, that way I can practice before TSHTF- I'll probably be too busy chopping wood then!
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Re: keeping warm

Postby IceFire » Thu Jan 07, 2010 6:53 pm

practicing your sewing now is an excellent idea, wingnut....not only can you mend your clothes, butbeing able to MAKE them will REALLY come in handy if TSHTF, and you don't have access to store-bought. Learn to make your own patterns, too. Sewing skills can be a GREAT means for bartering...you could do clothes/blanket for those who DON'T have the skills, in exchange for something you need.
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Re: keeping warm

Postby MTJoe » Fri Jan 08, 2010 9:42 pm

Wingnut, PM me and I will get some links together on hide tanning, and will repost it here. It will just take me a week or so to get it all together. I do know each animal has enough brains to tan it's own hide. The question is, do you want fur on, or off? I will try to work on it over the weekend and get something together for you as I have a deer hide right now that is frozen and salted in the garage to use later. You should know, that you can buy like carpet, leather needles, and heavy duty fake sinew and stuff pretty cheap, like at Ben Franklin, and I have actually bought some of the needles at the grocery store, dont know why they had them, but was glad they were so cheap! Anyway, The books I have in front of me for my local library to look for ( I am doing a list for them) are:
Raw Fur Handling at it's best by Keith Winkler
Fur Handling 2000 by Hal Sullivan
Home Tanning and Leather making Guide by Harding
I know there are more, but like I said, that is what I had in front of me. Also, I would stay away from anything that calls for a lot of chems. They just wont be there in a post SHTF scenario!

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Re: keeping warm

Postby Wingnut » Fri Jan 08, 2010 10:34 pm

MTJoe wrote:Wingnut, PM me and I will get some links together on hide tanning, and will repost it here. It will just take me a week or so to get it all together. I do know each animal has enough brains to tan it's own hide. The question is, do you want fur on, or off? I will try to work on it over the weekend and get something together for you as I have a deer hide right now that is frozen and salted in the garage to use later. You should know, that you can buy like carpet, leather needles, and heavy duty fake sinew and stuff pretty cheap, like at Ben Franklin, and I have actually bought some of the needles at the grocery store, dont know why they had them, but was glad they were so cheap! Anyway, The books I have in front of me for my local library to look for ( I am doing a list for them) are:
Raw Fur Handling at it's best by Keith Winkler
Fur Handling 2000 by Hal Sullivan
Home Tanning and Leather making Guide by Harding
I know there are more, but like I said, that is what I had in front of me. Also, I would stay away from anything that calls for a lot of chems. They just wont be there in a post SHTF scenario!

Joe


Thanks Joe
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Re: keeping warm

Postby IceFire » Sat Jan 09, 2010 8:26 pm

Joe,

Definitely post the links here...I have a pretty good idea on how to dan hides WITHOUT the hair/fur, but I want to learn how to do hides with the fur ON (like rabbit skins)...I'm trying to talk my husband into letting me raise rabbits for meat, but I want to be able to make use of the skins, as well, so want to learn how to properly prepare them. Thanks!
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Re: keeping warm

Postby RockinB » Sat Jan 30, 2010 7:41 pm

On the keeping warm subject 150,000 homes & businesses are without power in Oklahoma after the ice storm knocked down power lines & poles Friday. Many residents have fled to North Texas hotels in the DFW area.

A wood stove (non-electric, any fuel source) should be on the top of everyones list for heating & cooking during emergencies.
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Re: keeping warm

Postby MTJoe » Sat Jan 30, 2010 8:06 pm

http://www.earthskills.net/hairOn.htm

This is most likely the easiest way to get hair on tan. Sorry it took so long to get back here!
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Re: keeping warm

Postby ReadyMom » Sat Jan 30, 2010 9:02 pm

IceFire wrote:practicing your sewing now is an excellent idea, wingnut....not only can you mend your clothes, butbeing able to MAKE them will REALLY come in handy if TSHTF, and you don't have access to store-bought. Learn to make your own patterns, too. Sewing skills can be a GREAT means for bartering...you could do clothes/blanket for those who DON'T have the skills, in exchange for something you need.


Better practice HAND sewing skill, too, though! Can't always count on the electric for some emergencies. Making a DOWN quilt sure will take some time, by hand, won't it? :o
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Re: keeping warm

Postby IceFire » Sat Jan 30, 2010 11:10 pm

Making ANY quilt by hand, down or not, is time consuming! I will usually piece the tops on the machine, but when it comes to the quilting, I usually prefer to do it by hand. My usual exception is baby quilts, which I expect to need a LOT of washing...those I usually do on the machine. If you are going to quilt by hand, do NOT use the "high loft" batts...the higher loft makes hand quilting more difficult.
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Re: keeping warm

Postby Dirk Williams » Mon Jan 03, 2011 1:46 pm

Some friends about 30 minutes from here make goose pillows and blankets. The TV show " Dirty Jobs" did a show on How To" last year. Just a thought but they live in TULELAKE Ca.It's strange Ive been around this business for 20 plus years and never gone in. This prepper site has opened my eyes to so much info it's frankly overwelming.

I sit and read this AP site for hours learning a better way.

Thank you all for really opening my eyes to how life should be.

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Re: keeping warm

Postby Laythar » Mon Jan 03, 2011 10:10 pm

RockinB wrote:On the keeping warm subject 150,000 homes & businesses are without power in Oklahoma after the ice storm knocked down power lines & poles Friday. Many residents have fled to North Texas hotels in the DFW area.

A wood stove (non-electric, any fuel source) should be on the top of everyones list for heating & cooking during emergencies.



Thanks for posting here Dirk, It let me read the thread and I found this comment, Cool, never knew I made the news. Well not me, per say, but the event. The power was out and I got to test our preps twice last year, winter blizzards and then the spring hail storm/tornados. It was all good at my place, plenty to eat, nice and warm. During the spring storms I put one of the generators on wheels and took it to my neighbor’s houses to cool down their freezers and refrigerators so no one lost any food. Wasn't a problem in the winter storms. :lol: Those that didn't have much we just packed in to my freezers for the duration, that reminds me, did they get that back? Ack, I better check, can't remember. Oh they must have. Is this what they call a senior moment? Sorry, a little ADD.

Everyone came here for water and hauled it back in carts/containers. It's nice to get these real world events to test your preps. Did add a solar radio after this and got rid of cable tv. Switched to Sat Dish when I discovered that even if you get power to your cable controller it doesn't work in a power outage, it needs power in the system to feed the signal down the line. So even though I had power I didn't have any news or information just videos, had assumed the cable would provide news and information. One of my neighbors was so impressed with how I was able to keep his fridge from getting ruined he put in a whole house generator and my family and I are welcome at his house anytime if things go south. Course we'll see how that holds when everything goes south including his NG feed for lack of pressure. Must be nice to have money though. :rofl: God Bless Oklahoma weather. It makes me better prepared every year. :lol:
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