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Wild foods of New England Connecticut

Wild foods, edible plants and herbs found in the North Eastern U.S. and South Eastern Canada

Wild foods of New England Connecticut

Postby cityhomesteader » Thu Apr 22, 2010 10:40 am

Cooking Ramps

* Cut cleaned ramps in one-inch pieces.
* Parboil in plain water.
* While ramps are boiling, fry bacon in large iron skillet to point just before they become crisp.
* Cut bacon in pieces.
* Drain parboiled ramps and place in hot bacon fat.
* Season with salt and pepper to taste; fry until done.

Serve garnished with boiled eggs, sliced.

Ramps are often cooked without boiling.

Some cooks break eggs over ramps during final seconds of cooking and stir lightly. Remove when eggs are done. Serve.



Potatoes and Ramps

* iron skillet
* 4 or 5 large potatoes, diced
* 1 lb. bacon
* 1 1/2 lb. ramps, cleaned and cut up
* 6 eggs (optional)
* salt and pepper to taste

1. Fry bacon in skillet.
2. Remove from pan and set aside.
3. Put cut up potatoes in bacon grease and let fry 3 to 4 minutes.
4. Add cut up ramps and continue frying until potatoes are well done.
5. Put previously fried bacon on top of potatoes and ramps; let simmer for about 2 minutes.

If you want to add scrambled eggs, add after potatoes are done and before adding bacon.

Ramps and Eggs

* 1/2 doz. eggs
* 1/2 tsp. salt
* 2 doz. ramps
* 1/4 c. bacon drippings

1. Clean and cut up ramps, using 1/2 of the stems.
2. Place bacon drippings in iron skillet; heat to sizzling.
3. Put in ramps and salt; fry until tender.
4. Scramble eggs; pour over ramps and stir until eggs are done.

Serve with crisp bacon and cornbread.
Ramp Soup

* 6 medium potatoes
* 2 onions
* 1 c. cooked ham, diced
* 2 tsp. salt
* 1/2 tsp. pepper
* 2 c. milk
* 3 Tbsp. flour
* 1 to 2 c. fresh ramps

1. Peel and dice potatoes and onions; cook with 3 cups water, diced ham, salt and pepper.
2. Cook until potatoes are done.
3. Add 1 to 2 cups ramps to hot base (both top and bottoms of ramps).
4. Add 2 cups milk, plus 3 tablespoons flour (blended together); bring just to boiling point.
5. Serve hot with a small pat of margarine in each bowl.
Ramp Casserole

* 1 lb. pork sausage
* 4 eggs
* 2 c. grated Cheddar cheese
* 2 c. milk
* 15 ramps
* 10 potatoes, sliced

1. In skillet fry sausage, stirring as it fries.
2. Beat eggs, add milk and set aside.
3. In large baking dish, layer potatoes, sausage and chopped ramps.
4. Pour egg and milk over mixture over layers.
5. Top with grated cheese.
6. Bake at 350 degrees until potatoes are tender.
Ramp Casserole 2

* 2 c. cut up ramps, steamed until tender
* 4 c. potatoes, diced and boiled until tender
* 1 lb. bacon, fried crisp and crumbled
* 1 lb. ground chuck, browned, then drained
* 6 eggs, scrambled
* 1 lb. hot pepper cheese
* 2 c. potato water

# Prepare each of the ingredients (ramps, potatoes, bacon, ground chuck and eggs) separately.
# Add together and put in casserole dish.
# Slice cheese and spread over mixture.
# Pour potato water over all.
# Bake at 350 degrees about 40 minutes until brown.
Mountain Breakfast

* 6 strips streaked meat
* 4 medium potatoes
* 12 ramps, chopped
* 8 eggs

1. Fry meat until all grease is rendered.
2. Remove meat.
3. Fry very thin sliced potatoes in grease until done.
4. Add ramps; cook 2 minutes over medium heat.
5. Mixing well while frying.
6. Pour eggs over potatoes and ramps.
7. Stir until egg are done.

Makes 4 servings.
Ramp Ribs
From: Christopher Valenzuela

* 1 Large rack of pork ribs
* 1 pint of cleaned ramps
* 2 two crushed garlic cloves
* 3 finely chopped habenero peppers
* 4 dashes of balsamic vinegar
* Salt and Pepper to taste

1. Rub the salt and pepper and garlic into both sides of the ribs.
2. Place the ribs curve up on some aluminum foil.
3. Place on the concave surfaced the ramps and sprinkle over with the hot peppers.
4. Give it several dashes of vinegar.
5. Wrap it up in foil and bake on the grill for 1 hour.
6. Carefully open the foil and mush what is left of the ramps and smear over the meat.
7. Place the meat on the grill and brown both sides.
8. Baste the meat with the juice ramp mixture left in the foil.
9. Just before removal coat well with your favorite barbecue sauce.

Forget the napkins everyone will want to lick their fingers.
Cityhomesteader
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Re: Cooking Ramps

Postby cityhomesteader » Thu Apr 22, 2010 10:41 am

Those ribs look good!!
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Re: Cooking Ramps

Postby Vina8 » Thu Apr 22, 2010 12:41 pm

Great recipes, Bruce! Now, I just have to find us some ramps. I haven't seen any since I was a kid. My dad loved 'em.
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Re: Cooking Ramps

Postby cityhomesteader » Thu Apr 22, 2010 1:40 pm

MtM I walked into the woods today to check out a few areas I will be leading a forgaging group into..They are thick..You need to find a woods with a nice river or stream that runs through it and hard woods.. Of Course where you are that means snakes LOL I seen more Copperheads in one day in NC than I had seen in my Life time.. in that was in Walkertown nc
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Re: Cooking Ramps

Postby TheLight » Thu Apr 22, 2010 1:43 pm

Ramps?
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Re: Cooking Ramps

Postby WhiteWolf » Thu Apr 22, 2010 1:49 pm

Ok question from the limey (Brit) across the pond

What are RAMPS????????
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Re: Cooking Ramps

Postby lghb » Thu Apr 22, 2010 3:36 pm

WhiteWolf, you are not alone; I do not know what ramps are either.
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Re: Cooking Ramps

Postby cityhomesteader » Thu Apr 22, 2010 4:21 pm

Cityhomesteader
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“Stand at the crossroads and look; ask for the ancient paths, ask where the good way is, and walk in it, and you will find rest for your souls. Jeremiah 6"
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Re: Cooking Ramps

Postby WhiteWolf » Thu Apr 22, 2010 4:53 pm

Thanks for the link

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Re: Cooking Ramps

Postby Vina8 » Thu Apr 22, 2010 5:21 pm

Thanks for the link, Bruce. Today I was trying to explain to my husband what ramps are. I thought the article was interesting. I didn't realize ramps are a WV "thing." I will have to get out and look for some in our woods.

Gee, Bruce--you mean there are poisonous snakes in NC? :eek: We haven't seen any yet, but are careful. If we go out in the woods I wear my snake proof boots and maybe snake gators if I am going to be in some brush. Arizona had rattlesnakes, but copperheads and cottonmouths are a whole lot worse--mean as hell and no warning before they strike. My grandpa, never went out walking without a "snake stick." He used it as a walking stick, too. But it had a fork on the end that could pin a snake to the ground while he killed it. It may not be PC nowadays, but poisonous snakes were always killed.
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Re: Cooking Ramps

Postby cityhomesteader » Thu Apr 22, 2010 6:14 pm

Harvesting Wild Leeks
written by Jason Akl
http://www.basspro.com/webapp/wcs/store ... ctID=30113

These delicacies pop right up from the ground just asking to be pulled on your walk home from fishing.

Wild leek's flavor is very similar to onions, particularly like scallions, but with a wilder touch added in.
Out of all the edible wild vegetation that grows in our nearby forests one of the most overlooked plants would have to be ramps or wild leeks. These wild leeks are a type of wild-growing onion with a wonderful roasted garlic aroma found growing throughout the forest floor. These leeks generally are characterized by having fresh green leaves attached to the small white bulb. In regions that have a good harvest of wild leeks, a folk medicine reputation has been associated with these wild edibles to be powerful healers. In all actuality wild leeks are high in Vitamins C and A, and full of beneficial minerals. To add to this wild leeks have also been known to have a similar cholesterol-reducing capacity as to that of garlic and other members of this family.


Ramps or wild leeks are a native plant to many different regions of the United States, ranging from the Appalachian Mountains to the Great Lakes region. Generally a good place to start looking for these wild leeks is in moist, open hardwood forests or in and around small wooded streams harboring many shading areas. The seasons for harvesting ramps seem to be almost endless with early spring being especially good for young milder-tasting leeks while late summer, early fall bringing big, robust flavored ramps. Don't let their odorous reputation scare you from trying these delicacies; ramps or wild leeks are served in some of the finest restaurants in America, with no complaints.


Identification Tips


Ramps/wild leeks are very easily identifiable depending on what time of the year you decide to harvest them. In spring ramps are the first green vegetables to emerge from the ground in the woods. Making them easy to spot and identify from other potentially dangerous plants. The wild leeks that you are looking for should have 2 to 3 broad, smooth green leaves with an unmistakable garlic onion odor. The leaves should come directly from the ground and are not connected to any sort of stem or trunk. The point where the leaves enter the ground should start to turn a maroon color and eventually feed into a large white bulb connected to a cluster of hair-like roots. During the summer and fall, ramps will not longer be able to be identified by their leaf structures. During this time of year the wild leeks will be in the flowering stage. To identify leeks look for a small maroon colored stalk connected to a typical onion family flower. Traditional wild onions will have a pink to purple flowers while wild leeks will have white flowers.


Harvesting Wild Leeks


When harvesting good wild leeks there are a few key features you should look for in the plants. First off wild leeks should have two or three bright green leaves with the small white bulb attached by a purplish stem. The key is to find leeks that are as fresh as possible. Yellowing or withering in the leaves is a sign that these particular leeks have been in the ground too long. Ideally the leaves should be around 6 inches long and 2 inches wide, for the mildest flavor. You should be careful on the amount of leeks you intend on harvesting in one area.

Small patches of leeks can be over-harvested leaving nothing for the upcoming season. Depending on what you plan on using the leeks for, you might just harvest the leaves leaving the bulb in the ground. Selective harvesting in this way is good idea seeing as these remaining bulbs will sprout new leaves the following year.


In most cases when you harvest ramps or wild leeks they will be muddy from the field and will need to be cleaned and trimmed. Taking the time to properly clean and identify each leek that you have picked is a wise choice. A papery wrapper leaf (and some dirt) may surround the bulb when you pull the plants from the soil. This coating should be removed when you get the leeks home and begin to clean them up. Additionally any roots that were pulled with the plant should be trimmed off along with their button attachment. Be careful to look for any yellowing or slimy textures to the plants you have picked. If you happen to come across any leeks with these signs simply discard the leek and move on to the next. Once trimmed and cleaned the entire plant is choice for eating.


Storing Ramps and Wild Leeks


After you have cleaned and trimmed the leeks you have picked, store them in the refrigerator as you would green onions. Because of their small size it is a good idea to pack them into a plastic bag so that they do not dry out. If you happen to have one of those nifty home vacuum sealer devices then a good idea would be to package up a few leeks together and freeze them for later use. With the leek leaves it is a good idea to use them as soon as possible after harvest.


Preparation


Ramps or wild leeks can be used in a wide variety of uses in the kitchen. Wild leek's flavor is very similar to onions, particularly like scallions, but with a wilder touch added in. For cooking they can be used interchangeably in any recipe that calls for scallions or green onions. Slicing leeks thin gives an amazing flavor twist to salads or stir-frys, while the more daring love their earthy flavor raw.


in all these delicacies pop right up from the ground just asking to be pulled on your walk home from fishing. Pluck them from the ground this year and try the leeks stuffed inside a trout on the grill. You will find it a most rewarding meal.


http://www.basspro.com/webapp/wcs/store ... ctID=30113
Cityhomesteader
16 This is what the LORD says:
“Stand at the crossroads and look; ask for the ancient paths, ask where the good way is, and walk in it, and you will find rest for your souls. Jeremiah 6"
http://www.ConnecticutPreppersNetwork.net
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Re: Cooking Ramps

Postby cityhomesteader » Thu Apr 22, 2010 6:17 pm

Cultivating Ramps: Wild Leeks of Appalachia

http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/ncnu02/v5-449.html
Cityhomesteader
16 This is what the LORD says:
“Stand at the crossroads and look; ask for the ancient paths, ask where the good way is, and walk in it, and you will find rest for your souls. Jeremiah 6"
http://www.ConnecticutPreppersNetwork.net
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Re: Cooking Ramps

Postby cityhomesteader » Thu Apr 22, 2010 6:18 pm

I will have seeds from my plants this fall for a SASE
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16 This is what the LORD says:
“Stand at the crossroads and look; ask for the ancient paths, ask where the good way is, and walk in it, and you will find rest for your souls. Jeremiah 6"
http://www.ConnecticutPreppersNetwork.net
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Re: Cooking Ramps

Postby Whisper » Thu Apr 22, 2010 6:47 pm

You people didn't know what ramps were! :innocent: Yuck Leeks


MountainMama wrote:Gee, Bruce--you mean there are poisonous snakes in NC? :eek: We haven't seen any yet (1 yr.), but are careful. If we go out in the woods I wear my snake proof boots and maybe snake gators if I am going to be in some brush. Arizona had rattlesnakes, but copperheads and cottonmouths are a whole lot worse--mean as hell and no warning before they strike. My grandpa who lived in WV, never went out walking without a "snake stick." He used it as a walking stick, too. But it had a fork on the end that could pin a snake to the ground while he killed it. It may not be PC nowadays, but poisonous snakes were always killed.


Ah, we have Rattlesnake, Copperheads, coral snake, tree snakes and now cobra's both spitting and the regular ones. They have come up from florida where some fool released them. And I know I missed one or two that are here now.
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Re: Cooking Ramps

Postby okie B » Thu Apr 22, 2010 7:35 pm

There was an Anthony Bourdain's No Reservations show a while back that had him going to a "cook-out" type thing where they roasted/grilled ramps, then wrapped them up in newspapers and let them steam, then stood around and ate them while drinking prodigious amounts of wine, if I remember correctly. I can't remember what country he was in, but I want to say it was like Italy or Greece or something like that.
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