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Real FORAGING

Wild foods, edible plants and herbs found in the North Eastern U.S. and South Eastern Canada

Real FORAGING

Postby sageprice » Thu Jul 10, 2014 3:36 pm

Are you practising what you preach?
This week, inspite of the heat. I went out to forage. Didn't have to go far, my own back yard. Lambs quarters, sorrel, plantain and clover. Easy to ID, Iliked the taste of clover best. Nibbled on some wild daylillies, best as fritters. Then came the milk weed pods. These were delicious. will save seeds of my plants. Don't confuse with Dogbane which is nasty in every way. Boil young pods for 20 minuets. salt? nahh! butter? yeap! It's the season let me know what you found in mommas garden.
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Re: Real FORAGING

Postby ohiofarmer » Thu Jul 10, 2014 4:03 pm

The only thing I forage for anymore other than berries - is mushrooms, dandelion's, and ground cherry's. Don't really have time or don't make time to do it anymore. Farmer
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Re: Real FORAGING

Postby Cin » Thu Jul 10, 2014 9:27 pm

I forage dandelion greens for salads, but not much else, although I can if neccessary. I recognise chicory, cattails (the roots are edible), have 3 hickory trees in my yard for nuts, and we have scads of prairie cone flowers (the source of echinacia). We also have oaks, which produce acorns. There's some wild cherries and wild roses (for hte rose hips) down the road, too. I've also used the cambium layer of hickory to make "chips" - they didn't taste like anything, but I now know how to do it. Hickory bark makes a lovely tasting syrup, with plenty of sugar added. We have clover but we let the rabbit have it - keeps him off my garden!

I need to learn more about what is edible around me, there's just so much to do right now with the garden and canning/dehydrating/processing.
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Re: Real FORAGING

Postby AuntBee » Thu Jul 10, 2014 9:42 pm

Does eating a cricket count?

I never heard of eating milk weed pods before. We have them all over the place here, so thanks for the tip.

Are "lambs quarters" the same as "lambs ears?"

Unfortunately, I don't practice foraging. The weed-control spray is all over the place, and I haven't been out and about to look for a likely field. We do have cattails, though. And crunchy frogs.

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Re: Real FORAGING

Postby oldasrocks » Thu Jul 10, 2014 10:43 pm

I want to forage in Aunt Bees liquor cabinet. I hear it well stocked with a large variety.
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Re: Real FORAGING

Postby IceFire » Thu Jul 10, 2014 11:55 pm

Around here, one of the best things to forage is mesquite "beans". They are just starting to be ready now. Then, after a couple of months of drying time, they will be milled into a HIGHLY nutritious, slightly sweet-tasting flour (that retails for around $14-$18 per pound). Mesquite flour is high in protein, NO gluten (so it's great for people with gluten intolerances), and does NOT cause blood sugar spikes in diabetics.

Prickly pear fruits (called "tuna") and prickly pear pads (nopales, or nopalitos) and cholla buds are also high on the foraging list (just beware of the cactus spines and glochids!)
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Re: Real FORAGING

Postby pelenaka » Fri Jul 11, 2014 3:00 am

Back yard - Black & Red Raspberries, if I can scrape up some spare $ to buy vodka I'll make up cordials. Thinking ahead for gifts ... yeah that's my story & I'm sticking with it ... gift giving.
Ran out of homemade soap a few months ago have a ton of plantain which I'll infuse in the lard for soap making. Plantain is great for angry skin.
Also a good patch a Goldenseal has developed.
10 years ago I planted 6 purple cone flower plants a.k.a. Echinacea, These past few years those six original plants have been very prolific. I've been potting up all the off spring with an eye toward bartering but there is enough to harvest & try my hand @ making salves & tea.
5 years ago I planted a bit of Solomon's Seal which is now needs to be thinned, looking forward to experimenting with that.

Not really wild foraging but earlier this week thanks to a good tip a group of us scored peas fro a field that won't be harvested. So for the past few days I've been pea shelling, blanching, & finally bagging. Altogether 17 cups worth.
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Re: Real FORAGING

Postby AuntBee » Fri Jul 11, 2014 6:16 am

oldasrocks wrote:I want to forage in Aunt Bees liquor cabinet. I hear it well stocked with a large variety.


I do not know where Aunt Bee got this reputation. Aunt Bee is a sweet old lady who just happens to have keyed deadbolt locks on all of her closets. They are just right for storing extra mouse traps and unexpected guests who mistake the closet door for the outside door.

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Wondering if the closets can be refrigerated
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Re: Real FORAGING

Postby sageprice » Tue Jul 14, 2015 7:25 pm

I can see that there are very few real preppers out there. Most are dependant on stored or garden raised food. Just remember all of these garden plants originated with mother nature and we only tweaked them to make them more palatable and profitable.
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Re: Real FORAGING

Postby ajax727 » Tue Jul 14, 2015 8:47 pm

Sage maybe you can inform us on more of the eatable plants . For us it is things like nut grass , pigweed , blueberries , blackberries ,mushrooms ,wild grapes cattails along with wild cherries and a few more plants we class as weeds .
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Re: Real FORAGING

Postby sageprice » Wed Jul 15, 2015 9:12 am

Check out the landscaping plants like dahlia and hosta
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Re: Real FORAGING

Postby IceFire » Wed Jul 15, 2015 11:12 pm

The property we are in the process of buying has a lot of mesquite trees on it. Mesquite beans when still tender can be used to make jellies, or be cooked as a vegetable. When fully ripened and dried, the pods and seeds can be ground into a highly nutritious, high-protein flour with a slightly sweet taste. Because it has NO gluten, it is great for people on gluten-free diets, and is also good for diabetics. Around here, buying mesquite flour will set you back about $18 per pound. Foraging the mesquite beans, drying them yourself, then taking them to the Farmers Market to be ground when they bring around the big flail mill will cost about $1 per pound. IF you happen to have a grain mill that can handle the rock-hard seeds, then it won't cost anything at all.
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Re: Real FORAGING

Postby Bangfly59 » Thu Jul 16, 2015 10:20 am

The best plant to forage for in mother natures garden is wild green onions (ALLIUM). They can make any boring dish a wonderfully tasting meal. I like to munch them by themselves, or mixed with a dish. They will keep for days, allowing me to store them or just eat them as I walk. The light green bulb section is to die for and the dark green part is flavorful, even as a topping on a salad. The best part is that they are found in most of the United States, along most roadways or open fields. One just has to look for them.
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Re: Real FORAGING

Postby daaswampman » Thu Jul 16, 2015 12:13 pm

I agree that foraging is a skill that must be practiced. I am blessed that I have land and a very long growing season. There is always something that can be harvested, but time is a major problem for me. I do practice, but foraging is only a tiny part of my overall diet other than preserves from fruit and berries.

This year reminded me that even nature cannot be depended on. Last year there were more wild plums than anyone could pick, this year there are nearly none. Swamp
People rarely notice what it right in front of their eyes. The Da Vinci Code
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Re: Real FORAGING

Postby sageprice » Fri Jul 17, 2015 8:35 pm

daaswampman wrote:I agree that foraging is a skill that must be practiced. I am blessed that I have land and a very long growing season. There is always something that can be harvested, but time is a major problem for me. I do practice, but foraging is only a tiny part of my overall diet other than preserves from fruit and berries.

This year reminded me that even nature cannot be depended on. Last year there were more wild plums than anyone could pick, this year there are nearly none. Swamp


You are a real prepper when you recognize that things run in cycles. Bamboo is one of them and Oak also has large and small years of Masting (heavy and light years of acorn production). Realizing that some years are better than others is Mother Natures natural training. Just like realizing a heavy snow year can increase ground water and produce heavier crop yields. Knowledge is your power. :clap: :clap: :clap: :lol: :lol:
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