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A good way to buy land for that Shelter

Long Term/Short Term Survival Shelters. Constructions tips and ideas.

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A good way to buy land for that Shelter

Postby Whisper » Fri Mar 12, 2010 7:41 pm

This is a pretty good article when looking for land. I know from past experience that things mentioned in this article are true. One of the best parts I will quote below.

"There's something else nice to know when you're thinking about how much to offer, many times the landowner's deed will specifically state how much he or she paid for the property. Knowing how much they stand to make can help you in making your decision of how much you want to pay. "

I have never made an offer on property without knowing this first. I have not low balled because of this either. It gives you a good idea of how much play they have or if they paid more then you think it's worth. Why waste each others time.

Basically, it does cover many of the things that not everyone knows about.


http://www.homestead.org/NeilShelton/Ho ... heaply.htm
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Re: A good way to buy land for that Shelter

Postby Vina8 » Fri Mar 12, 2010 8:02 pm

Good article, Whisper. We have done some of that kind of research and found out interesting stuff.
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Re: A good way to buy land for that Shelter

Postby Hunter » Wed May 26, 2010 12:35 pm

Other things to concider when buying land for a shelter is what resources will you require for said land. If you plan on living even in part off the land or through hunting and fishing you should be aware of things like migration patterns of the animals as well as the birds. You may need more then one location to do so if you are considering buying land in an area that most of the huntable wildlife abandons for parts of the year. In heavy snow belt areas most of the wildlife will migrate to yarding areas often exceeding fifty or a hundred miles or more away in the winter and not return until the green of spring returns. In the mountins they may migrate to lower elevations during the winters. So consider such things when buying a place to shelter it should be four season.
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Re: A good way to buy land for that Shelter

Postby bjcunningham » Fri Jun 25, 2010 1:23 am

Excellent info. Thanks, whisper!
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Re: A good way to buy land for that Shelter

Postby recon » Mon Jul 05, 2010 9:43 pm

Great info. :thumbup:
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Re: A good way to buy land for that Shelter

Postby RotorHead » Thu Jul 15, 2010 6:31 pm

One of the most important items, when looking at a BOL or retreat or even a final home . . . is your neighbors. Suburbia is one thing, rural country side is another. Do the folks there welcome new comers, or are you considered an "outsider". How will you plan to "fit in"? I'm not a big proponent of BOL's, unless you can develop the relationships needed to survive if the nation/region turns into a "soup sandwich". The next logical question then is "how do I do that"? Which I will leave for a later post, if anyone is interested?

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Re: A good way to buy land for that Shelter

Postby Whisper » Thu Jul 15, 2010 9:34 pm

RotorHead wrote:One of the most important items, when looking at a BOL or retreat or even a final home . . . is your neighbors. Suburbia is one thing, rural country side is another. Do the folks there welcome new comers, or are you considered an "outsider". How will you plan to "fit in"? I'm not a big proponent of BOL's, unless you can develop the relationships needed to survive if the nation/region turns into a "soup sandwich". The next logical question then is "how do I do that"? Which I will leave for a later post, if anyone is interested?

RotorHead


Post away, I for one would be very interested. When I purchased my land in PA over a decade ago, I was excepted by some but not by others. It turn very bad and the wife didn't want to go back.
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Re: A good way to buy land for that Shelter

Postby TheLight » Tue Jul 20, 2010 1:37 pm

Another thing I just found out about this weekend is tax sales. Counties in NY state sell off properties that are delinquent on their taxes for four years. The auction starts for the back taxes. Often times good deals can be had. I'm fairly sure it works similarly in other states as well.
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Re: A good way to buy land for that Shelter

Postby okie B » Tue Jul 20, 2010 1:50 pm

Tax sales can be a good deal price-wise, but they can be a nightmare title-wise.

If someone hasn't paid their taxes, the city/state/county can seize the property and sell it for back taxes. If that happens, the delinquent owner is allowed the chance to pay the delinquent taxes and recoup title to the property. There is usually even a window of opportunity to pay even after the property has been sold to you -- how long of a time can vary. There can also be issue with tax disputes and quiet title actions.

Whenever you purchase property through a tax-sale, you receive a sheriff's deed or a tax deed (it gets called different things in different places). This is essentially the equivalent of a quit claim deed except it also has connotations of the delinquent taxes associated with the land regardless of who legal and/or equitable title of the land is vested in. You still need to exercise due diligence in researching the title. If you purchase a piece of property from a tax sale and come to find out that it is charged with an equitable trust, you may never actually get to use the property you bought, and there is really nothing that can be done about it.

One thing that you might consider is looking at the tax rolls to see what properties are listed as delinquent. You can then go back and do a little research -- when was the property purchased, have they ever paid taxes on it, was it an inheritance, how much is owed on it, etc. There are people who go out and acquire large amounts of land simply by doing this research, then contacting the delinquent owners and making an offer somewhat along the lines of "Well, the county is getting ready to review its tax rolls, and this property XYZ is delinquent. It has a value of $A and a delinquency of $B. Court costs average this amount. I'll buy the property for $C, and you won't have to worry about going to court." It happens quite often.
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Re: A good way to buy land for that Shelter

Postby RotorHead » Sat Jul 24, 2010 8:40 pm

This is the follow-on to my original post of "neighbors and fitting in". We had the luxury of time when we started to "shop" for our full time retreat. We had a very specific list of "must haves" for the property (this would be a separate post, if anyone cares) and it took us 5 years and many thousand miles of driving before we found the right one. One of those "must haves" was "friendly neighbors", or at least folks willing to welcome newcomers (just a note the wife is "reserved" but very friendly and personable, I'm very outgoing . . . so this might not work for folks who are introverts). When we found a likely location, one that had all the other "must haves" then we started our "neighbors" discovery. We would talk to the folks who lived the nearest . . . let them know we were interested in buying "that" property and wanted to know about: shopping, schools, church's, community activities, etc. This was a very casual conversation and we found that MOST folks were willing to talk and share thoughts . . . there were a few that were very cold and stand-offish . . . which removed that property from the list! Once the initial conversation was going well, we ask if they belong to a church . . . if they did we would ask if we could go Sunday (most of our trips involved weekends). If we got the invitation to their church (and we didn't care what denomination it was) . . . we would make sure to meet as many folks as we could after service . . . your "pool" of information just expanded. Some areas we found were not welcoming to "strangers" . . . we smiled, thanked them . . . and never came back (and removed the property from our list).

If we felt welcomed by a the folks, then we expanded our inquiries to "local shops and restaurants" (NOT chain stores) and talked with the folks . . . in small communities/towns it is "normal" to carry on a conversation with the staff . . .even in a line and no one minds. We would strike up conversations with anyone who would listen . . . we looked for community involvement (was it a "caring" community . . . or was everyone in it for themselves, resort communities fell into this category). You can find out these things from the city or county administrative offices . . . and the church connections you've made. Once we had a "good" feeling about the location we would go back over several weeks and try "new" church's (for us that is an important factor . . . not denomination) . . . this continued to build new relations and provide more information for a decision.

The end result was 50%, or more, "failed" the larger "friendly" test . . . and we just moved on, no matter how much we liked the piece of property. About 25% passed the "friendly" test, but something (very ill defined, just a feeling) that this was NOT it! About 15% passed all the test and were visited multiple times, and at this point we began to look for and talk to builders/contractors . . . this process further reduced the list (we knew what we wanted) . . . the bottom line is after 5 years we found THE property . . . it passed every test . . . there was NO second choice. We owned the property for 3 years before we could build, but "vacationed" on it at least once a month . . . by the time we actually built our home we already knew all our neighbors, had connected to a church community and gotten "plugged-in" to the community as a whole. We have now lived here 2 years, have developed very good friends (and found some preppers) . . . joined a church (the wife plays the piano, we teach the teen Sunday school and I was elected one of the Deacons) . . . joined a community service organization (the Ruritans) . . . the first year here I was the Memorial Day speaker for the church . . . this year I was the main speaker for the entire county. So you not only have to look for and find a "friendly community", you must be willing to work at being a part of it!

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Re: A good way to buy land for that Shelter

Postby fedorthedog » Fri Nov 30, 2012 8:35 pm

I moved into a community not caring about what the locals thought. I lived on my own for several years without making a lot of friends, Then went through a divorce and remarried. The one thing that I did do was join the local volunteer fire dept. In 2007 after 13 years in the community there was a massive flood. I am a PO and one of the things I am good at is emergency prep and response. I helped out in this event and came to the conclusion that being able to rely on farm people when the SHTF is a big plus. People in a rural environment are different and will survive. Make sure they will accept you, because if they dont they will eat you.
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Re: A good way to buy land for that Shelter

Postby contrarian » Fri Nov 30, 2012 9:58 pm

Another way of doing the property research is by using county GIS services. Sometimes this is a different office, sometimes tied to the assesor or treasurer. Some of them make it quite easy to locate the owner, purchase history, taxes paid, all without moving out of your chair.
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Re: A good way to buy land for that Shelter

Postby Lynda » Sat Dec 01, 2012 5:27 am

RotorHead wrote:One of the most important items, when looking at a BOL or retreat or even a final home . . . is your neighbors. Suburbia is one thing, rural country side is another. Do the folks there welcome new comers, or are you considered an "outsider". How will you plan to "fit in"? I'm not a big proponent of BOL's, unless you can develop the relationships needed to survive if the nation/region turns into a "soup sandwich". The next logical question then is "how do I do that"? Which I will leave for a later post, if anyone is interested?

RotorHead



I agree with this, although it did take us some time to adjust to the environment and for the neighbors to adjust to us as we were both away working full time. Now that we're both retired it just naturally evolved and we've gotten more involved with the community. Differences are overlooked for the most part and we've learned which neighbors are trustworthy and who is not. As with any neighborhood and community there are the selfish takers and the considerate, thoughtful people.
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Re: A good way to buy land for that Shelter

Postby slanted » Wed Dec 14, 2016 9:42 pm

I couldn't care less what the neighbors think, say or do. I aint buying any land, just digging a spiderhole or 3, at night. If shtf, the neighbors are very likely to be dead, and there will be plenty of new looter types around. Others might be ok, but will have contagious diseases, etc. Best that nobody knows you're there.

Once shtf, the small hole can quickly and discretely be extented into a horizontal tunnel, with the dirt being hauled away and dumped into a creek or just scattered under brush. If anyone finds the hole prior to shtf, there's nothing there to make them remember it or want to return to it.
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