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BOLs in Alaska

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BOLs in Alaska

Postby Photon Guy » Thu Jul 21, 2016 2:03 am

I was thinking, Alaska might be excellent for Bug Out Locations, particularly in the more remote areas up in the far north. Places such as Barrow, Beaver, and Fort Yukon. From what I know there are no roads that go up that far north so you would have to have a means of getting there, preferably a privately owned aircraft, but also the absence of roads and easy access is part of what makes it so ideal for having a BOL in such an area, it keeps out unwanted people. So I would love to have a BOL in such a spot.
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Re: BOLs in Alaska

Postby Illini Warrior » Thu Jul 21, 2016 10:50 am

the full time residents - experienced, independent and prepared will be lucky to survive a severe SHTF when there's no more re-supply from the Lower 48 ...

you better hope that the plane that dropped you off comes back when your stored beenie weenie runs out ....
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Re: BOLs in Alaska

Postby anita » Thu Jul 21, 2016 10:56 am

I see a couple of issues--first, I am guessing what you can grow is pretty limited, so you have to be heavily stocked with all supplies.
Second--if you don't live there year-round, how do you get there if you can't fly/drive?


I imagine you'll hear from Permafrost since he has a cabin in Alaska.
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Re: BOLs in Alaska

Postby Gunns » Thu Jul 21, 2016 11:25 am

Permafrost might be the exception but I think very few of us could survive the Alaska wilderness without Modern conveniences.

Even Permafrost is going to have a hard time without Gas.
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Re: BOLs in Alaska

Postby Photon Guy » Thu Jul 21, 2016 1:05 pm

Illini Warrior wrote:the full time residents - experienced, independent and prepared will be lucky to survive a severe SHTF when there's no more re-supply from the Lower 48 ...

you better hope that the plane that dropped you off comes back when your stored beenie weenie runs out ....


That's why if I did have a BOL in such a location I would keep it well stocked with enough food and supplies to last for years.
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Re: BOLs in Alaska

Postby Photon Guy » Thu Jul 21, 2016 1:08 pm

anita wrote:I see a couple of issues--first, I am guessing what you can grow is pretty limited, so you have to be heavily stocked with all supplies.
Second--if you don't live there year-round, how do you get there if you can't fly/drive?


I imagine you'll hear from Permafrost since he has a cabin in Alaska.


If I did have a BOL in such a location I would want a means of getting there preferably my own private aircraft. That way I can get there during a crisis when the airlines aren't running. As for what can be grown, during the summer it can get quite hot there so I suppose there's some stuff that can be grown, and there's also indoor greenhouses. On site I would also want an off road vehicle to get around in.
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Re: BOLs in Alaska

Postby anita » Thu Jul 21, 2016 1:09 pm

I'm no expert, but I think the temperature extremes would make it almost impossible to live there long-term in a grid-down situation, even if you could make your way there.
In honor of RebNavy: "Then call us Rebels if you will, we glory in the name, for bending under unjust laws and swearing faith to an unjust cause, we count as greater shame". Richmond Daily Dispatch May 12 1862

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Re: BOLs in Alaska

Postby Photon Guy » Thu Jul 21, 2016 1:15 pm

anita wrote:I'm no expert, but I think the temperature extremes would make it almost impossible to live there long-term in a grid-down situation, even if you could make your way there.


If you've got the proper dwelling with heating you could do it.
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Re: BOLs in Alaska

Postby Gunns » Thu Jul 21, 2016 2:05 pm

Well you could make a BOL any place on earth if its stocked right. You could have one at the bottom of the Ocean too.
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Re: BOLs in Alaska

Postby anita » Thu Jul 21, 2016 2:54 pm

I think that life will be tough enough if you have to bug out, without adding extreme temps and isolation to the mix. If you lived in Alaska anyway, and were just going more remote it would be one thing, but it seems like adding a whole bunch of difficulty to an already difficult situation to be trying to move from the lower 48 to remote northern Alaska in a bug-out situation.
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Re: BOLs in Alaska

Postby Photon Guy » Thu Jul 21, 2016 3:06 pm

anita wrote:I think that life will be tough enough if you have to bug out, without adding extreme temps and isolation to the mix. If you lived in Alaska anyway, and were just going more remote it would be one thing, but it seems like adding a whole bunch of difficulty to an already difficult situation to be trying to move from the lower 48 to remote northern Alaska in a bug-out situation.


The advantage of that is that you don't have to worry much about raiders or otherwise unwanted visitors. Also, a major concern when having a BOL is that in a SHTF event, somebody else doesn't get their first and take it over. That's partially why its a good idea for your BOL to be in an isolated location. Lots of people think they will go into the woods in the lower 48 in a crisis or they think that they can have a BOL out in the wilderness but the problem with that is if its in the wilderness in the lower 48 there is a good chance it will be stumbled upon. The fact that many people will go into the wilderness is what makes having a BOL there a bad idea unless its a remote wilderness that's hard to get to such as in northern Alaska. So in this case the extreme temps and remoteness will work to a great advantage.
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Re: BOLs in Alaska

Postby anita » Thu Jul 21, 2016 3:17 pm

Just curious how you will get from here to there if you don't have the ability to drive/fly.

Are you going to walk from PA to Alaska? Ride a bike? What?
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Re: BOLs in Alaska

Postby Permafrost » Thu Jul 21, 2016 4:10 pm

Photon Guy wrote:I was thinking, Alaska might be excellent for Bug Out Locations, particularly in the more remote areas up in the far north. Places such as Barrow, Beaver, and Fort Yukon. From what I know there are no roads that go up that far north so you would have to have a means of getting there, preferably a privately owned aircraft, but also the absence of roads and easy access is part of what makes it so ideal for having a BOL in such an area, it keeps out unwanted people. So I would love to have a BOL in such a spot.

I hate raining on anyone's parade but the places you listed are not what I would call "friendly" to outsiders. I have a good reputation on the Yukon (many villages consider me native regardless of my race) and even I have had a gun pulled on me in Beaver because I am white, Beaver and Stevens Village are two of the most racist places on the Yukon River. Most of the Yukon has a decidedly negative attitude to americans. Ft. Yukon has been having "disputes" with the federal authorities lately and it would not surprise me to see a little bloodshed in the next few years. If someone was to get land in this country it would not be advisable to ever leave it unattended. If you do not have multiple families or a chief protecting or "claiming" you, your stuff will simply walk away or your cabin will spontaneously combust. Getting on the good side of a chief takes years or even decades if you are not from the area, and requires a lot of work within the village to "prove" yourself.

Airplanes are another issue altogether. Let me start by saying I was raised in the back seat of my grandfathers Cessna 170, flying was a way of life to get to our mine or trap lines or hunting grounds. Even if you ignore the FAA completely (some do here and are never caught) you still have a extremely labor intensive method of traveling. Granted a mechanically inclined person can do most maintenance on a small plane because they were all made from about 1950 to 1980, but just the parts add up quickly. If someone was inclined to do it "legal" the cost is astronomical, between annuals insurance registration airport fees and a actual pilots license. A creative guy can split the difference and label their plane as experimental with the FAA but this creates it's own set of headaches. Even when money is no object there is a level of proficiency that is required to pilot a airplane and land on floats on a muddy silt river in the summer. Glacial silt rivers change their channel every day or so, and because you can not see the bottom it is extremely hard to land on floats. I can't even charter a airplane out to my cabin even if I can afford it, nobody wants to dodge stumps & trees floating down the river while trying to land in a deep spot that may or may not be there. And these are professional bush pilots that fly all day long every day, not just weekend warriors on wings. Other issues you will have are fuel requirements if you are coming from the U.S., you are going to have to refuel somewhere and that somewhere is likely in Canada. Is this even possible during a state of emergency and if it is will they part with some 100LL Avgas?

Enough with the negatives, there are also plenty of positives. The population density outside of the villages is so low that living off the land is possible. Hunting and fishing can provide all the meat you will need for the year if you plan it out right. Large silt rivers provide firewood if you do it right, every year trees wash down the rivers and you only need to snag them with a grappling hook from the bank. Once you thaw the top two feet of soil (permafrost does thaw if you remove the insulated vegetative mat) you can grow potatoes and carrots. Greenhouses and raised beds can be used to grow the rest of what you need for the year. Winter travel is easily accomplished by dog team and the rivers provide the fish (needs to be supplemented with potatoes) that your dogs will run on, no gas required. Summer travel is a little more difficult without gas, you are locked into a canoe and that means either long lining it from the bank up the river or paddling up the river, luckily you never need to go farther than a few miles.

Setting up a self sustaining homestead in remote Alaska is a lot of work. It takes years to get to the point where you can live without resupply, and then you will do without many things people think of as a necessity. In the winter snow is substituted for toilet paper, I've yet to find a good substitute in the summer. Without sugar canned or dried fruits that are harvested do not taste very good. Cutting large amounts of firewood with only a ax or cross cut saw sucks. Hunting with a bow is difficult at best and generally leads to a hungry belly. My goal is 90 % self sufficiency (both through stored goods and subsistence) by the time I am 55 years old with a death date of 100 years old for planning purposes. Even that is rather ambitious, and I live here and spend about 1/3 to 1/2 the year at my property.

I know many people that only come to town once a year to buy supplies & sell furs, and they make it work and live pretty well. I know a few people who only come to town every few years and they get by. I know one guy who has not been to town for like 15 years, and my dogs live better than he does.

I will be in town for another week or so, if you are serious about getting a BOL in Interior Alaska get ahold of me & I can answer any questions you have. After that I will not be back on grid until late September.
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Re: BOLs in Alaska

Postby Photon Guy » Thu Jul 21, 2016 5:10 pm

anita wrote:Just curious how you will get from here to there if you don't have the ability to drive/fly.

Are you going to walk from PA to Alaska? Ride a bike? What?


Walking from PA to northern Alaska would be quite a long walk and even though Im in good shape I doubt I could make it through much of the really rough terrain, especially in a crisis and especially if the weather is bad and its freezing. So walking is a no go. :) If I were to have a BOL in northern Alaska I would want a private airplane that I would fly myself and that's how I would get there. Of course owning a private airplane would mean money as would having a good BOL in northern Alaska, not stuff I can afford right now but if I ever am able to afford a BOL in northern Alaska I will make sure to be able to afford an airplane too.
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Re: BOLs in Alaska

Postby Illini Warrior » Thu Jul 21, 2016 5:47 pm

Photon Guy wrote:
Illini Warrior wrote:the full time residents - experienced, independent and prepared will be lucky to survive a severe SHTF when there's no more re-supply from the Lower 48 ...

you better hope that the plane that dropped you off comes back when your stored beenie weenie runs out ....


That's why if I did have a BOL in such a location I would keep it well stocked with enough food and supplies to last for years.



it's just a little harder surviving than that - plus - again your supplies run out and you need assist ... Nome & Anchorage are dead cities and Alaska is down to scattered natives that managed to hang on .... and your BOL is hundreds of miles from a small village that used to be there - now it's a 1,000 miles to someone that answers the ham radio - and he needs more help than you ....

the State of Alaska has stockpiled food to help the cities hold out when the state becomes cut off from the Lower 48 ....

https://www.shtfplan.com/emergency-prep ... s_08292012

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/remote-al ... NlYwNzcg--
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