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Survival Strategies

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Survival Strategies

Postby alaskawatchmen » Tue May 10, 2011 12:20 pm

Having been involved in this field for thirty (+) years, it amazes me the pure fantasy that I read about other prepper’s survival plans. Allow me to detail a few that I remember:

One guy has a very large RV full of everything that would make life seem normal in the worst case scenario. Food, water, propane, microwave, washer/dryer, satellite television, radio gear, atv, and a ton of other stuff.

His plan is to hitch up a pull-behind trailer and load it with the rest of his stuff, toss in a wife, four adults, and three kids—and then head out into the wild Alaska where he intends to live in relative comfort among the beauty of nature.

PROBLEM 1: There might not be enough warning to load up, pack up, get everyone together in time.
PROBLEM 2: There might not be any roads left when the SHTF, and thus the RV will be useless.
PROBLEM 3: Other people might be doing exactly the same thing, and pretty soon that 10MPG very large and heavy RV will soon run out of diesel fuel.
PROBLEM 4: Somebody might take said RV from said survivalist, leaving him and said family stranded on the side of the road, or perhaps dead!

Another Alaska Prepper plans on grabbing his BOB and trekking across the Chugach Mountains to a public use cabin that he found two years ago.

PROBLEM 1: It’s winter, -40 below zero, the trails are under five feet of snow.
PROBLEM 2: His wife and two (very young) children will probably NOT survive the trip, as his total food supply in the BOB consists of a jar of rice (Glass), two bags of beef jerky, three tea bags, and approximately 900 rounds of .223cal ammunition.

The last Alaska Prepper lives in a small two bedroom condo in the Mid-Town area of Anchorage. He has approximately one month worth of food stored away, and all of the requisite survival gear. His plan is to “shelter In Place” during whatever crisis hits Anchorage.
PROBLEM 1: He can’t seem to remember “TSUNAMI”; claims it will never happen.
PROBLEM 2: Earthquakes tend to knock down flimsy little clapboard buildings in a hurry.
PROBLEM 3: All that food and gear might very well be washed out to see or crushed under tons of material.

I’ll be first to admit that a bad plan is better than no plan—but a good plan trumps the rest.
Our group members maintain a READY Bag in the vehicles, as well as hand-held and mobile radios. A full blown BOB is kept at home, and there are three areas around Anchorage/MATSU where other supplies are stored away. Putting all of your food and supplies in one single area is dangerous. The price of a small storage lot in Wasilla, Girdwood, and other geographic areas insures that at least one cache will survive.

But is that the end, or the start of a survival plan?

More later if there is interest...
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Re: Survival Strategies

Postby Atreus » Tue May 10, 2011 12:27 pm

Keep up the good work. We all need to work out the bugs in our plans and flexibility and knowledge might be the things that save our lives.
There won't be a declared "SHTF" day so be prepared.
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Re: Survival Strategies

Postby alaskawatchmen » Tue May 10, 2011 12:32 pm

Absolutely Atreus;
Survival planning is paramount to survival thinking.
Second to that involves having either advance warning, or credible training.
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Re: Survival Strategies

Postby Alaska Rose » Fri May 20, 2011 2:22 am

Wow, those folks must think just by living in Alaska, that they are halfway to any sort of survival knowledge they need. I would think the whole MatSu area would be very dangerous in almost any SHTF scenario. Earthquake, Tsunami,volcano, bomb, whatever, too many people in too small an area. About half the whole State's population lives in that large bowl, what a potential mess.
I'm not saying I would be in a lot better condition than the better prepared folk living there. But I do have less people to contend with. Earthquakes and volcanoes can still impact me negatively. So can a simple forest fire. I'm pretty sure I am fairly safe from flood except in biblical purportions. People will still be the most dangerous of the problems, I think.
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Re: Survival Strategies

Postby Atreus » Fri May 20, 2011 9:19 am

It's amazing how many people think they can just go out in the wilderness and live off the land with just a rifle and a few bullets and no real training. I see this all the time on other boards when I mention prepping.

It's possible that no matter how much we prepare we could still lose all our preps right in the beginning of a SHTF situation. But the one thing we can always retain as long as we are alive and not severely injured with a brain injury is our knowledge.

So, what are your options if TSHTF and you lose everything?

Foraging in rural and urban areas.
Hunting without modern weapons.
Quickly building a shelter and staying warm.
Recognizing situations where you need to GOOD.
Recognizing situation where you need to stay put.
There won't be a declared "SHTF" day so be prepared.
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Re: Survival Strategies

Postby Crusis » Fri May 20, 2011 1:13 pm

PROBLEM 3: probably isn't too big of a deal if he keeps his tanks full. An idling diesel sips fuel, and he probably has tanks that are at least 80 gallons. If he keeps them full, as he should, then he'll have a LOT of idling capacity. And he could always turn off his engine.

I agree that his plan is stupid otherwise, though. My bug out land is 70 miles away, so it's not like I'm in a lot better shape though as I have to pass through a mountain pass to get there.
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Re: Survival Strategies

Postby Alaska Rose » Mon Oct 31, 2011 12:01 am

I think there is always interest in how others are planning and doing. We can all learn new things and it increases all our chances of survival no matter what happens.
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https://www.createspace.com/4910851 ....And Then You Die - autobiography
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