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Postby Garbage barge » Thu Feb 16, 2017 11:37 am

Anyone active in Kent or Sussex County? Some of the prepping skills that I am involved in is Back Yard Food Production, Canning, Vac Food Sealing, Food Storage, Water Catchment, Soap Making, Compost Making, Fuel Storage, Plant Propagation, Battery Backup Power, Seed Saving and Ammo Storage.
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Re: New Member

Postby Hightide63 » Sat Mar 11, 2017 1:11 am

Hi. Just came across you post and thought I'd give you a shout. Doesn't seem to be a lot of action on here. That's a shame. But like a lot of my friends nobody seems to want to put forth any effort. I on the other hand would like to start meeting people in more of a group setting to get out and do things for the purpose of learning and teaching different skills concerning survival/prepping. Hopefully that will happen and we can meet. All depends on how much people really want to that i guess.
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Re: New Member

Postby casualprepper » Thu Oct 26, 2017 1:02 pm

Food seems to be the main problem for me. In Delaware the soil is pretty bad, where I am anyway, so gardening will be hard. Scavenging is effective but unreliable. Tips?
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Re: New Member

Postby IceFire » Thu Oct 26, 2017 11:19 pm

Casualprepper, even though your soil is not good, it CAN be improved! It does take some time, and lots of work, but it CAN be done! First thing is to take stock of exactly WHAT the problem is, and work from there. If your soil is too sandy, then you need to work in lots of organic matter. LOTS of compost, Manure, etc....things that will help hold the moisture in the soil. If it's like mine, which packs down like concrete, then you need to work in things to break that up. Gypsum helps to break up hard clay soils, as well as working in some sand, LOTS of compost (again), things that will help loosen the soil and keep it from packing together. If your water table is VERY high (as in, your soil tends to stay soggy) then raised beds can really help. It's hard to know what to suggest without knowing just what you're dealing with.
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Re: New Member

Postby casualprepper » Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:10 pm

IceFire wrote:Casualprepper, even though your soil is not good, it CAN be improved! It does take some time, and lots of work, but it CAN be done! First thing is to take stock of exactly WHAT the problem is, and work from there. If your soil is too sandy, then you need to work in lots of organic matter. LOTS of compost, Manure, etc....things that will help hold the moisture in the soil. If it's like mine, which packs down like concrete, then you need to work in things to break that up. Gypsum helps to break up hard clay soils, as well as working in some sand, LOTS of compost (again), things that will help loosen the soil and keep it from packing together. If your water table is VERY high (as in, your soil tends to stay soggy) then raised beds can really help. It's hard to know what to suggest without knowing just what you're dealing with.



Thanks! And yes my soil is extremely clay ridden and covered with roots of big trees. Every time I dig I hit a root
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Re: New Member

Postby IceFire » Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:29 pm

casualprepper wrote:
IceFire wrote:Casualprepper, even though your soil is not good, it CAN be improved! It does take some time, and lots of work, but it CAN be done! First thing is to take stock of exactly WHAT the problem is, and work from there. If your soil is too sandy, then you need to work in lots of organic matter. LOTS of compost, Manure, etc....things that will help hold the moisture in the soil. If it's like mine, which packs down like concrete, then you need to work in things to break that up. Gypsum helps to break up hard clay soils, as well as working in some sand, LOTS of compost (again), things that will help loosen the soil and keep it from packing together. If your water table is VERY high (as in, your soil tends to stay soggy) then raised beds can really help. It's hard to know what to suggest without knowing just what you're dealing with.



Thanks! And yes my soil is extremely clay ridden and covered with roots of big trees. Every time I dig I hit a root


OK, with heavy clay, I would DEFINITELY recommend raised beds. Till up the soil as best you can, and work in sand, gypsum, LOTS and LOTS of compost (the more organic matter you can work in, the better!) It may take a couple of years to get the soil to where you want it to be, so start early, and keep at it! DO NOT wait for spring! Start NOW, so that your amendments have time to work on the soil condition.
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