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Local Edible Plants etc.

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Local Edible Plants etc.

Postby JoseyWales » Sat Mar 17, 2012 7:37 pm

For those of us living in the Mt. Hood area and Pacific NW in general it may come in handy to know which plants (and fungi) can help you stay fed. This knowledge could prove useful should there be a shortage or situation in which you have to supplement or even survive when you've used up your supplies or were forced to depart without bringing food with you. It's likely you already know many edible plants. Many of these are considered weeds and lawn/garden pests. For some of the edible plants I was already familiar with, I found additional uses I did'nt know. I also found some suprising new plants in my recent research.
I'll include a few below and if you know of others, feel free to add. I'll add more if there is interest. Contributions don't have to be restricted to plants. If you know of a tasty bug, fungi or way to prepare something on the list, or even non food uses of local flora, thats helpful too.

The young growth of many plants and trees are edible.

MINERS LETTUCE- All parts edible raw.

CATTAIL- Have edible roots (rhizomes), white inner shoots, pollen, green flower spikes can be cooked, brown flower spikes can be burnt and the seeds eaten. Grows near water.

BERRIES- There are dozens of edible berries including several varieties of Blackberry, a couple Huckleberries, Salmonberry, Thimbleberry, Strawberry, Salal (this stuff is everywhere in the forest around here), Oregon Grape (eat Oregon Grape berries in moderation as they can be toxic in large quantities, they're sour too)

DANDELION- All parts edible raw. Have heard of but not tasted Dandelion wine.

FERN- "Fiddlenecks" Young shoots of several types (ostrich and bracken to name two)can be eaten cooked. I've eaten them raw without problem but many websites recommend cooking. Many fern rhizomes (roots) can be eaten cooked, boiled, steamed, or pounded into flour. Some rhizomes had medical uses like curing diarreah or sore throat. Leaves should not be eaten but can be used for bedding, or to line cooking pits or drying racks. Some ferns can cause thyamine defeciency if eaten in large amounts or consistently over time. The many types make identification difficult for beginners

PLANTAIN- Young leaves can be eaten raw and seeds may be dried and ground.

WILD ROSE- Young shoots and leaves, petals, buds and hips (fruit). Spit out seeds inside hips

PINEAPPLE WEED- Smells like pineapple when crushed. Flower heads edible raw. The rest of the plant is edible but doesnt taste great. Also can be powdered and used on meat to keep flies away and keep from spoiling. Often found along roadsides .

CLOVER- Parts growing above ground can be eaten raw, roots and creepers can be cooked. I found some info that says to dip or boil in saltwater to counteract bloating. Also says sprouts have the best flavor. Flour can be made of dried and ground flowers and seed.

Some suprises...

DEVILS CLUB- One nasty plant if you've ever brushed against or fallen into it. This one likes to grow near water, especially next to the log you want to cross the stream on. The spine tips often break off under the skin and hurt for weeks, can probably be used as a weapon too, but.... Roots and young stems can be cooked and eaten, young leaves without spines can be eaten raw. Berries are not edible.

TIGER LILY- A pretty drooping orangeish yellow flower with black spots in the throat. Bulbs, seed and flowers all edible raw. Bulbs are best when boiled in a couple changes of water, or can be dried and stored.

BEARGRASS- Thick tuberous roots are edible when cooked or boiled.
I notice groups of Latinos harvesting Salal and Beargrass in the spring for use in floral arrangements.
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Re: Local Edible Plants etc.

Postby theicevalkyrie » Sun Mar 18, 2012 1:04 am

Great thread after our discussion! I'd really like to get out and find some stuff in nature. Perhaps some pictures to help people identify?

Clover
Lamb's quarters aka pigsweed: all eaten raw, seeds can be ground into a bitter black flour but should be eaten in moderation (I have this everywhere in my yard...)
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Mountain sorrel: leaves can be eaten raw, cooked or as tea
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Yellow cress: tastes like peppery radish, eaten raw
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Burdock: roots edible, young leaves
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Fireweed (but don't eat too much!! Excess= natural laxative): leaves/flowers/shoots (stem can be used as thickener)
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Just your local, friendly geologist with a good nature.
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Re: Local Edible Plants etc.

Postby JoseyWales » Tue Mar 20, 2012 2:58 am

Yes I should add pictures for the less common ones, and when possible pictures of the plant when not in bloom since thats how they look most of the year. Many websites make this mistake.


MINERS LETTUCE- All parts edible raw.

Image

CATTAIL- Have edible roots (rhizomes), white inner shoots, pollen, green flower spikes can be cooked, brown flower spikes can be burnt and the seeds eaten. Grows near water.

BERRIES- There are dozens of edible berries including several varieties of Blackberry, a couple Huckleberries, Salmonberry, Thimbleberry, Strawberry, Salal (this stuff is everywhere in the forest around here), Oregon Grape (eat Oregon Grape berries in moderation as they can be toxic in large quantities, they're sour too)

DANDELION- All parts edible raw. Have heard of but not tasted Dandelion wine.

FERN- "Fiddlenecks" Young shoots of several types (ostrich and bracken to name two)can be eaten cooked. I've eaten them raw without problem but many sources recommend cooking. Many fern rhizomes (roots) can be eaten cooked, boiled, steamed, or pounded into flour. Some rhizomes had medical uses like curing diarreah or sore throat. Leaves should not be eaten but can be used for bedding, or to line cooking pits or drying racks. Some ferns can cause thyamine defeciency if eaten in large amounts or consistently over time. The many types make identification difficult for beginners



PLANTAIN- Young leaves can be eaten raw and seeds may be dried and ground.

Image


WILD ROSE- Young shoots and leaves, petals, buds and hips (fruit). Spit out seeds inside hips

Image


PINEAPPLE WEED- Smells like pineapple when crushed. Flower heads edible raw. The rest of the plant is edible but doesnt taste great. Also can be powdered and used on meat to keep flies away and keep from spoiling. Often found along roadsides .

Image



CLOVER- Parts growing above ground can be eaten raw, roots and creepers can be cooked. I found some info that says to dip or boil in saltwater to counteract bloating. Also says sprouts have the best flavor. Flour can be made of dried and ground flowers and seed.



Some suprises...

DEVILS CLUB- (Opopanax horridus) The name does'nt lie. One nasty plant if you've ever brushed against or fallen into it. This one likes to grow near water, especially next to the log you want to cross the stream on. The spine tips often break off under the skin and hurt for weeks, can probably be used as a weapon too, but.... Roots and young stems can be cooked and eaten, young leaves without spines can be eaten raw. Berries are not edible.

Image
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TIGER LILY- A pretty drooping orangeish yellow flower with black spots in the throat. Bulbs, seed and flowers all edible raw. Bulbs are best when boiled in a couple changes of water, or can be dried and stored. Many lilys are similarly edible

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BEARGRASS- Thick tuberous roots are edible when cooked or boiled.
I notice groups of Latinos harvesting Salal and Beargrass in the spring for use in floral arrangements. Roots and leaves are also used for weaving baskets.

Image
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Re: Local Edible Plants etc.

Postby JoseyWales » Sat Mar 31, 2012 7:06 pm

THISTLE- There are several edible thistles in the NW
Canada/Creeping thistle (Cirsium arvense), Bull thistle (Cirsium vulgare), Indian thistle (Cirsium brevistylum), Hooker's thistle (Cirsium hookerianum) and Leafy thistle (Cirsium foliosum).


Roots of plants that have not gone to seed can be eaten raw. Best when cooked, boiled , roasted.
Stems, leaves and immature flower buds may also be eaten raw, but are probably better steamed or cooked otherwise.
Stems and leaves should be peeled to remove thorns, The newer top growth is more palatable. Similar to celery
Several sources recommend to EAT IN MODERATION, can cause gas, rumors of carcinogenic qualities of some species (The only negative effects I found in my research or experience are; nasty Yellow Star Thistle poisons horses and pops bicycle tires, Russian Thistle poisoning sheep). Lots of articles on the anti-carcinogenic properties of the milk thistle.

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Re: Local Edible Plants etc.

Postby JoseyWales » Fri Jan 04, 2013 12:37 am

I foraged for and found the following fungi while gathering for a fall mushroom festival held annually in Estacada . An "expert" retired mycologist is on hand every year to identify things people bring in Over half of my haul turned out to be edible varieties and many were gathered from within a stones throw of my home. The big finds were Chanterelles and Boletes but I also found Deer Mushrooms, Agarics, and Blewits. Several festival attendees took home some of my haul to eat. DONT EAT MUSHROOMS UNLESS YOU ARE SURE WHAT THEY ARE!

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Pluteus cervinusLATIN NAME(S) Pluteus cervinus (Fr.) P. Kumm. Fuehrer Pilzk.: 99. 1871; Pluteus atricapillus (Batsch) Fayod?
ENGLISH NAME(S) deer-mushroom, fawn-colored mushroom
EDIBILITY yes, especially when fresh and firm, do not eat any that are not clearly growing on wood (to avoid confusion with Entolomas), (Arora)
TASTE earth-like to radish-like (occasionally disagreeable), (Banerjee), not distinctive (Phillips)
NOTES characterized by medium to large, brown, bald cap, free, close gills, dingy whitish stem, typically with fine pinkish gray-brown longitudinal spiral striation, absence of veil, growth on wood, pinkish brown spore deposit
CAP 3-12(15)cm across, obtuse or convex becoming broadly convex to broadly umbonate or flat; dark brown to pale brown to grayish brown or dingy fawn, margin sometimes paler; "smooth or radially streaked with fibrils, slightly viscid when moist and often somewhat wrinkled when young", (Arora), (3)5-15(20)cm across, obtuse when young, soon broadly bell-shaped, finally flat or nearly so, sometimes retaining low broad umbo; color variable: "isabella color", pale buffy brown, "dresden brown" to "pale smoky gray", disc often darker; "soft to the touch and semiviscid to viscid (rarely very viscid)", often uneven or wrinkled at first but becoming even when old, bald to radially streaked with appressed fibrils, minutely squamulose to fibrillose scaly over disc at times, margin even to occasionally striate, cap cuticle separable to disc, (Banerjee)
FLESH soft; white, (Arora), moderately thick (0.8-1.2cm), relatively soft; pallid to white, unchanging, (Banerjee)
GILLS free at maturity, close or crowded, broad, soft; "white becoming pinkish, finally dingy reddish or flesh-colored", (Arora), approximate to stem, close, broad (1-1.6cm), 1-2(3) tiers of subgills; pallid to white before becoming pink to light pinkish cinnamon, edges pallid; edges even, (Banerjee), edges are white-fringed under a hand-lens (Trudell)
STEM 5-13cm x 0.5-2(2.5)cm, equal or wider at base; "white or with grayish to brownish longitudinal fibrils"; dry, (Arora), 5-14(19)cm x (0.3)0.6-1.2(2.4)cm at top, equal to slightly tapering, firm, solid; pallid, dingy whitish, evenly colored except for base that sometimes shows traces of fibrils of similar color to disc; becoming bald, "typically with fine pinkish gray brown spiral striations along the length (occasionally with blackish fibrils forming a reticulum)", base sometimes cottony-mycelioid, (Banerjee)
VEIL absent (Arora)
ODOR usually radish-like, (Arora), mild (Banerjee), not distinctive (Phillips), strong of radish or potato (Trudell)
HABITAT single or in groups "on decaying wood, debris, sawdust piles, or humus rich in lignin", (Arora), single to scattered (to gregarious) on decayed hardwood logs, stumps and sawdust, but also reported from conifer duff, and at least one case from an Abies log, (Banerjee), "in cool damp weather usually in spring and fall", (Miller), "can be found throughout the year when temperature and moisture are conducive", (Trudell)
SPORE DEPOSIT flesh-colored to pinkish-brown, (Arora), "cinnamon" (Kornerup(3) color), (Banerjee), salmon to pink (Miller)
NAME ORIGIN name means "deer-like" from color


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LATIN NAME(S) Agaricus augustus Fr. Epicr. 212. 1836, Hym. Eur. 278. 1885
ENGLISH NAME(S) The Prince
EDIBILITY yes, one of the best, (Arora), occasional people get stomach upset, sweet and almondy when young, strong and mushroomy at maturity
TASTE pleasant, of almonds, (Phillips), mild (Miller)
NOTES distinguished by large size, yellow staining cap with fibrils or scales that are dark brown to warm brown or tawny brown, gills that are pallid, sometimes briefly pinkish, then grayish brown and chocolate brown from spores, stem that is smooth in upper part and shaggy with white or brown-tipped scales in lower part, prominent skirt-like ring, almond odor, and growth in disturbed soil; Agaricus perrarus Schulz. is given as a synonym by Breitenbach(4) and other European authors, but the material that A.H. Smith named A. perrarus he showed was different and this has been renamed Agaricus smithii Kerrigan; the odor of A. augustus is due to benzaldehyde which can be perceived as anise by some or as the usual almond odor (Wood(1)); common in Pacific Northwest, including BC, WA, OR, CA, Breitenbach(4) give distribution as North America, Europe, Asia, North Africa, CHEMICAL REACTIONS cap surface staining yellow in KOH (Arora)
CAP 7-30(40)cm across, "usually marshmallow-shaped but sometimes convex", expanding to flat or with an uplifted margin; "covered with numerous dark brown to warm brown or tawny-brown fibrils or fibrillose scales" on a white background that usually becomes yellowish, buff, or ocher when old, "giving an overall golden tone to many mature specimens", center often darker; may bruise yellow when rubbed, especially when young; dry, "surface sometimes breaking up into warts in dry weather", (Arora), 8-32cm across, at first nearly spherical or more cylindric, then convex to broadly convex, finally flat to uplifted, margin sometimes wavy; at first medium brown, later darker brown, or dark brown when old, on whitish background, sometimes becoming bright yellow when bruised or cut, often tawny when old, typically yellowish to orange after drying; dry, appressed-fibrillose becoming appressed-fibrillose-squamulose when mature, scales about 0.5cm long, with pointed tips, "or alternatively forming large patches of fibrils", or sometimes areolate [cracked like dried mud] if dried out, (Kerrigan)
FLESH thick, firm, white, (Arora), up to 3cm thick, firm when young; white, sometimes becoming yellow near cuticle after exposure, in stem white, occasionally yellowish somewhat near cuticle or base when cut, (Kerrigan)
GILLS free when mature, close; pallid, sometimes briefly pinkish, finally turning grayish brown, eventually chocolate brown to blackish brown, (Arora), free, close, up to 2cm broad; pallid when young, occasionally briefly pink, later grayish brown, finally dark blackish brown, with pallid margin, (Kerrigan)
STEM 8-35cm x 1-4(6)cm, equal or widening slightly downward, rather tough, fibrous, base usually deep in ground; "white but often aging or bruising yellowish"; "smooth above the ring, sheathed with white or brown-tipped scales below (but these often wearing away in age)", (Arora), 10-35cm x 1-4cm, equal, rarely widened in lower part, stuffed-hollow, somewhat fibrous, base deeply rooted; white, sometimes briefly pink near top after veil rupture, becoming pale yellowish when old; bald in upper part, under humid conditions completely covered in lower part with erect floccose squamules [woolly-cottony fine scales], (Kerrigan)
ODOR "sweet (like almond extract), especially when young", (Arora), of almonds (Kerrigan), pleasant, of almonds, (Phillips), anise (Hotson), anise or almonds (Miller)
HABITAT single or in groups or clumps on ground in woods, but usually near roads and paths, in clearings, and other places where soil disturbed, sometimes in flower beds, composted areas, under trees in towns, in arboretums, etc., (Arora), single to gregarious or cespitose [in tufts], in litter under Sequoia, Picea (spruce), Tsuga (hemlock), or occasionally Quercus (oak), or under planted Cupressus (cypress) or Pinus (pine), usually near roads or paths, or rarely in lawns near trees, fruiting year round, (Kerrigan for California), spring, summer, or fall, (Miller)
SPORE DEPOSIT chocolate brown (Arora)
NAME ORIGIN means "blessed, dignified, of great dimension", (Latin)



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LATIN NAME(S) Cantharellus formosus Corner Cantharelloid Fungi, Ann. Bot. Mem. 2: 45. 1960
ENGLISH NAME(S) Pacific golden chanterelle, Pacific chanterelle, golden chanterelle, yellow chanterelle
EDIBILITY idiosyncratic allergic-type reactions to chanterelles have been reported to North American Mycological Association's poison registry (Benjamin), widely consumed however and considered choice (Pilz)
TASTE mild to slightly peppery, (Tylutki), mildly peppery when raw (Pilz)NOTES this species has frequently been referred to in the past as Cantharellus cibarius, which is not known definitely to occur in the Pacific Northwest except in the variety roseocanus; features of C. formosus include yellowish orange firm fleshy lobed cap, decurrent vein-like ridges on spore-bearing surface that is orangish to orangish yellow with a pinkish tinge, yellowish orange stem, and yellowish white spore deposit; C. formosus is found in BC, WA, OR, and northwestern CA, CHEMICAL REACTIONS FeSO4 pale green, leaving bright orange ring after evaporation, PDAB bright yellow after 15 minutes, tests done after refrigeration for several days, (Redhead)
CAP 2-14cm across, fleshy; brightly colored dull orange yellow to orange, under wet conditions brilliant to soft orange yellow (apricot to orange or saffron (Rayner), "antimony yellow" or "deep chrome" (Ridgway)), "with a slightly duskier center and largely obscured overlying fuscous layer", but in strong shade salmon to rosy buff-colored, with yellow pigment apparently not fully developed, and upon partial drying or in dry conditions "the subhygrophanous fuscous layer becoming more conspicuous", appearing either as an even dusky coating and then the surface medium orange yellow to light yellow brown (or "yellow ocher" or "warm buff" (Ridgway)), or "breaking up into conspicuous appressed darker patches in scales or bands on a brighter background", bruising from handling "inconspicuous to conspicuous, inducing a slow yellowing which changes to ochraceous", (Redhead), 4-8cm wide, convex at first, depressed to concave in age; light grayish yellowish brown on disc, pale orange to yellowish white on the margin, bruising dark orange yellow; dry, subtomentose, irregularly rugose (wrinkled), (Tylutki), often big, up to 14cm across, dull orange to brown-orange cap; "frequently with small closely adhering, slightly darker scales particularly visible in dry weather", (Pilz)
FLESH whitish to paler than "ivory yellow", except immediately below pigmented surfaces, (Redhead), firm, thick, up to 0.4-0.8cm at stem; yellowish white, (Tylutki), firm, fibrous, when bruised at first turning yellow slowly, eventually darkening to dull ocher, (Pilz)
GILLS decurrent, consisting of radiating well developed folds (up to 0.2cm deep) tending to fork between the margins, depending on growth conditions either crowded (0.1cm apart), or subdistant (0.2cm apart) and "varying from scarcely anastomosing to distinctly intervenose with ladder-like branches, occasionally developing cracks when growth continues afterwards in dry weather"; pale orange yellow (Kelly) to saffron (Rayner) or "pale pinkish cinnamon" to "capucine buff" (Ridgway) in some areas when moist, to salmon (Rayner) in drier forms or even yellow white to buff on heavily shaded specimens, bruising yellow then ochraceous if fresh and humid, (Redhead); decurrent, forming well-developed radiating vein-like ridges or folds, forked, irregularly dichotomous; yellowish white to pale orange yellow with slight pale yellowish pink tint, especially toward margin; interveined in places, (Tylutki), deeply ridged, running from cap edge well down the stem; pale orange yellow and often with a pink cast, (Pilz)
STEM 4-8cm x 0.4-2.2cm, equal or narrowing downward, sometimes compressed, sheathed at top by decurrent smooth spore bearing surface extending beyond folds, with sheath occasionally fragmenting into small patches or bands; colored as or slightly paler than cap, "maize yellow" or "buff yellow" to "warm buff" (Ridgway), and usually not as dusky, bruising yellow then ochraceous (Kelly), "Capucine yellow" or slightly paler than "buckthorn brown" (Ridgway); nearly bald, more conspicuously fibrillose after handling, (Redhead), up to 5cm long and 0.8-1.6cm wide, cylindric; yellowish white to pale orange yellow, bruising dark orange yellow; furfuraceous to pruinose, (Tylutki), dull orange to brown-orange, (Pilz)
VEIL none
ODOR none or fragrant of apricots, (Tylutki), faint, fruity, apricot-like, more noticeable in drier fresh collections, (Pilz)
HABITAT single to gregarious, often in small clusters or slight arcs, on bare and mossy needle beds, sometimes near coarse woody debris, in both second growth and old growth western North American forests, most often under hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) sometimes mixed with Douglas fir


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LATIN NAME(S) Boletus regineus D. Arora and Simonini Economic Botany 62: 358. 2008
ENGLISH NAME(S) Queen Bolete
EDIBILITY delicious (Arora(1), Arora(2), Thiers)
TASTE mild or pleasant (Arora(1)), mild (Thiers)
CHEMICAL REACTIONS flesh does not stain with application of KOH or FeSO4, (Bessette)
CAP 5-15(20)cm, convex becoming broadly convex to flat; "dark brown to nearly black when young and covered at least partially with a fine whitish bloom", but when old becoming smooth and cinnamon or red-brown or blotched with paler, whitish to tan areas; dry or moist (or viscid only when old), smooth or somewhat pitted, (Arora(1)), 10-15cm, convex to nearly spherical when young, becoming broadly convex to flat-convex to flat when old; dark brown to almost black, when old sometimes fading irregularly on disc to buff or reddish brown with irregular areas almost white to tan; moist, never viscid, often pitted or with broad depressions, especially toward margin, bald but with scattered white pruinose areas or patches, (Thiers)
FLESH thick; white or tinged reddish, not turning blue when exposed, or turning blue only slightly near tubes, (Arora(1)), 2-4cm thick, vinaceous when young, white when old except pale yellow above tubes and pale vinaceous below cap surface; in stem white and unchanging when exposed, (Thiers)
PORES at first stuffed with pith; white when young, becoming yellow to greenish yellow when old, not turning blue when exposed, (Arora(1)), up to 1mm, angular; white when young, becoming yellow when mature, not changing where bruised; tube layer 1.5-2cm thick, adnate to adnexed, becoming depressed, white when young, becoming yellow when mature, (Thiers), 1-3 per mm, angular; white becoming dingy yellow; tube layer 1-2cm thick, becoming depressed near stem when old, (Bessette)
STEM 5-15cm x 2-5cm at top, usually widening downward when young but often equal when old, firm, solid; white or often brown when old; "finely reticulate at least over upper part", (Arora(1)), 8-11.5cm x 2.5-4cm at top, clavate [club-shaped] to subbulbous [somewhat bulbous] when young, unchanging or becoming more or less equal when old, solid; when young pallid to almost white, unchanging or becoming vinaceous or vinaceous brown when old; "dry, reticulate at least over upper half, sometimes strongly and conspicuously so", (Thiers)
ODOR mild (Thiers)
HABITAT single, scattered, or gregarious in mixed woods and under hardwoods (especially oaks), (Arora(1)), scattered to gregarious under oaks and madrones (Thiers for California)
SPORE DEPOSIT dark olive-brown (Arora(1), Thiers)
NAME ORIGIN means "bronze-colored" (Both)
SIMILAR Boletus edulis has a lighter brown cap that may become viscid, longer spores and a different cap cuticle, (Thiers), B. edulis has paler cap often with reddish tones, and grows under conifers, (Bessette)

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LATIN NAME(S) Lepista nuda (Bull.: Fr.) Cooke Handbook of British Fungi p. 192. 1871; Clitocybe nuda (Bull.: Fr.) H.E. Bigelow & A.H. Sm.; Rhodopaxillus nudus (Bull.: Fr.) Maire; Tricholoma nudum (Bull.: Fr.) P. Kumm.
ENGLISH NAME(S) blewit
EDIBILITY yes, popular, (Arora), slightly poisonous raw, (Lincoff(1))
TASTE pleasant to slightly bitter, (Arora), mild (Bigelow)
NOTES identified by stout stature, purple to bluish-purple color, inrolled cap margin when young, absence of veil, faintly fruity fragrance and dull pinkish spore deposit, (Arora); common in the Pacific Northwest, collections examined from OR, WA, also QC, CA, CO, CT, MA, MD, MI, TN, VA, VT, Norway, (Bigelow(5)),frequent on foray lists from BC, reported from Mexico (in Bigelow(5)), Europe, Asia, North Africa, Australia, (Breitenbach(3))
CAP 4-14(18)cm across, convex with inrolled margin at first, becoming broadly umbonate to flat, or with uplifted often wavy margin; "purple, or purple shaded with brown or gray when fresh, soon fading to brownish, flesh-color, tan, etc., but the margin often retaining purple tones well into maturity"; "smooth, lubricous when moist but not viscid", may be lustrous when dry, (Arora), 4-12(15)cm across, broadly convex at first with inrolled margin, becoming flat, occasionally with low broad umbo, margin at times uplifted, wavy, or irregular; hygrophanous, shades of violet when fresh and moist, soon fading on disc to "vinaceous buff", "pale vinaceous fawn", when old mostly "cinnamon buff" overall with only a slight violaceous tint at margin; bald, smooth, watery appearing when fresh, at times lubricous or subviscid, finally dull and dry, disc often appearing areolate [cracked like dried mud], margin often faintly short translucent-striate when moist, (Bigelow)
FLESH thick, rather soft; purplish to lilac-buff, (Arora), "moderately thick to thick, soft and pliant, watery at first"; dull lilac to lilac buff, finally whitish, in stem tinted "pale vinaceous fawn", (Bigelow)
GILLS adnate to adnexed or notched or sometimes decurrent, close; purple or pale purple to bluish purple or grayish purple, fading to buff, pinkish buff or brownish, (Arora), "adnexed to sinuate or rounded, broadly adnate to subdecurrent at times, close to crowded, narrow", 0.4-0.8cm broad; pale violet, buff to brownish when old; edges even or uneven, (Bigelow)
STEM 2.5-7(10)cm x 1-2.5(3)cm at top, equal or more often with widened base; purple to pale purple or colored like gills; dry, fibrillose, "base often covered with downy purple mycelium", (Arora), 3-6(10)cm x 1-2.5(3)cm, solid, usually relatively short, equal or base somewhat club-shaped to bulbous, marginate at times; ground color pale violet like gills ("deep dull lavender"), bruising "dark lavender", when old browning from the base upward; fibrillose to scurfy at top, striate with whitish fibrils in lower part, (Bigelow)
VEIL
ODOR "faintly fragrant when fresh (like frozen orange juice)", (Arora), pleasant, faintly fragrant, (Bigelow)
HABITAT scattered to gregarious, often in rings or arcs - "in woods, brush, gardens, compost piles, i.e., wherever there is organic debris", (Arora), single, gregarious or cespitose [in tufts], in humus under hardwoods, under conifers, on decaying vegetable matter or near trash piles and compost heaps, in meadows, on lawns, in orchards; late summer and fall, (Bigelow)
SPORE DEPOSIT dull pinkish to pinkish buff (Arora) , pinkish ("light vinaceous cinnamon", "vinaceous buff", "pinkish buff"), (Bigelow)
NAME ORIGIN means 'naked'; "blewit" is a shortened form of "blue hat", (Sept)
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Re: Local Edible Plants etc.

Postby JoseyWales » Mon Apr 29, 2013 9:38 pm

It seems that at least one of the loads of bark dust I used to top off the planting area I built for my boss last fall was innoculated with Morchella elata spores. This march there were several hundred Morel mushrooms all over his yard. In addition to the shrooms, I took home several bucketfulls of the innoculated bark dust to try and grow my own next spring.

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LATIN NAME(S) Morchella elata Fr.: Fr. group Arora Syst. Mycol. 2: 8. 1822
ENGLISH NAME(S) black morel
NOTES black morels discussed as a group here, but there are more than one species: additional information is given under "Morchella species"; other names that have been used in this group are Morchella angusticeps, Morchella conica, pink morel, and green morel; as a group they are commonly found in spring in the Pacific Northwest the year after fires and also away from fires; they have conic to oval or irregular caps with pits and ridges, the ridges dark at maturity and sometimes when young, white to buff or pinkish tinged hollow stem usually scurfy on the surface and attached to the cap for the full height of the cap, at most with a short overhang; description derived from Arora except where noted
EDIBILITY choice (always cook), but some people apparently "allergic", (Arora), excellent, but may cause upsets, especially with alcohol, (Lincoff(2))
HABITAT single, scattered, or in groups, clusters, or troops on ground in woods and at their edges, and in burned areas, primarily in spring
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