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Re: Buying as AR-15

PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 7:57 pm
by ajax727
I will add my 0.02 here 5.56 / 223 , as for brand that depends on the cash you want to spend , things break so enough parts to rebuild it several times , some prats will to be replaced as they wear so have extras of them . Also if it don't fit you aka feel good in the hands try one that will fit , just like gloves or shoes ( I know that is what I saw about handguns ) Ammo check out different brand bullet types and weights it may like several or just one . There is good advice above but you are the one that must live with your choice . I also have a couple built with help from a good friend I also have plenty of food for them to eat .
Best of luck .
I also talk to my O lady before I add new toys it is the right thing to do , we are one and have been one for 30 some years .

Re: Buying as AR-15

PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 2018 11:29 am
by Fullmoon
The military spec 5.56 ammunition is loaded with the maximum amount of powder, a compressed load where the base of the bullet is touching the powder in the case. The military wants maximum velocity and power from that 62 grain projectile and military M4 carbines have a thicker chamber to allow for the added chamber pressure generated by the 5.56 NATO cartridge. An AR marked as 223 caliber might not be able to handle the added pressure of a 5.56 military spec cartridge and shooting them with NATO rounds might cause severe damage to your bod when the barrel blows up. Best to make sure a new purchase rifle can handle both 223 and 5.56 rounds. NATO spec cartridges are stamped on the case end with a circle with a cross inside it so no matter which country manufactured the ammo it will work in your AR. U.S. made ammo is currently green tipped to designate the 62 grain M855 penetrator bullet. The older M193 round has a 55 grain projectile. I load my own using a 69 grain Sierra hollow point boat tail bullet with 23.50 grains of H-335 powder and a CCI magnum primer. This combination is super accurate. I've loaded some 77 grain bullets but the 69 are more accurate in my rifle.

Re: Buying as AR-15

PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 2018 12:21 pm
by Dirk Williams
Smart money's on a company with a proven track record. I'm a Colt guy, but Colts in money trouble right now.

What I would not purchase is any AR which requires proprietary parts. Parts specific to any one rifle or line of rifles.

Also not a fan of ar15, while some their get it, their's more knuckleheads their then most sites.

M4 carbine.com is where all the known m4 training guys hang out. I'm into like my 14/15th build, and that's where I go for advice.

Keep in mind that parts for the m4 are being rebuilt at a alarming rate. Example would be, trigger groups, stock assemblies, it's interesting to follow. I'm not one to get into a pickle with the latest greatest gotta have hang on your m4 crowd.

Practical.
Funtional.
Replaceable.
Or enhanced reliability are critical.

I don't need a lower receiver that doubles as a can opener for my Corona beer. Or a ton of lightening slots. More slots equal more places for dirt and grime to seat itself in the weapon. If you've got a budget of 1700.00 then spend the money on a 1700.00 rifle. Their's a reason that rifle cost that amount, it's likely a quality build.

I'm also a Rainier Arms fan, their " house" brand is exceptional, Kit.

After you purchase your rifle, you need at least twenty mags, a spare BCG, and Crane " o rings" for replacement. Perhaps a few lower extra parts, and upper parts.

Don't forget a good set of armors tools. And consider a m4 poster listing all parts, and where they sit inside the rifle.

Lots of quality parts kits on the market. Again I'm a fan of Colt parts kits.

Colt is the rifle all the other companies try to match, that's a pretty high standard.

The 6920 colt sells for 1k, and the 6940 monolithic upper rifles are 1400.00, the only thing I don't like about either is a short rail forward. Not a lot of room for kit, IF your into hanging a bunch of stuff on your rifle.

The up side is you plan to Max the limited space. Keeps junk off the rail, lightens the rifle70" which will handle faster/ better.

What can I say, I'm a gun guy, I just enjoy shooting building and loading custom ammo.

Who was it that said,

" accurate rifles are interesting rifles"

Dirk

Re: Buying as AR-15

PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 2018 12:39 pm
by Dirk Williams
Also essential kit for the m4 is the ability to hang a good light, unless your using IR lasers on your rifle, "I'm not a fan of colored lasers one can see with the naked eye" I,do like and use the IR laser kits, their a force multiplier at night. However then you need nods. Another expense, but a force multiplier at night.

" the ability to see 5/600 yards in max dark, the ability to put the IR dot on a mans chest and press the trigger is a very powerful tool. Now add a suppressor, and it's voodoo,


other then that and a flashlight, I don't want a bunch of poggy bait, dicking up my rifles Center of gravity. Others set their kit up differently. Good on them.

Sorry to ramble.

In closing I will share this. Shooting is a perishable skill set. My crew were recently on the CQB range, after a longggggggg time of not shooting our m4s. Was just ackward, I did ok, on the 25/30 y distance.

We opened the range out to 150/300y and I couldn't hit anything. I acknowledge my poor performance, a bad day on the range can be a blessing. I recognized my mistakes, slapping g the trigger, using a T-1 red dot at those distances is tough. It can be done, but requires maintaining the shooters edge.

The fundamental mistake was using the T1 at distance, that sight is designed for CQB, my remedy is to carry a zeroed ACOG in my kit box. And having the wisdom to change out the optic package when the dynamics call for that change.

After all their's no sense is wasting ammo, and giving ones position away if your not hitting your target.

Just food for thought, hope you all consider this post and learn from my bad day on the range.

Dirk