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Re: How Many People Know About 90% Coins?

PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2014 10:07 am
by daaswampman
AuntBee wrote:I keep a separate jar of 1965-1975 dimes, nickels and quarters. As people have been saying, most people don't have a clue. These dates at least still have 40% and dont look or feel as chintzy as new coins. It seems like even those dates are becoming kind of scarce. Did the government recall coins that might have intrinsic value?

No idea how much is enough. I keep telling myself that bartering a can of soup will have more value than a handful of change, but then I keep reading about buying silver, silver, and more silver. Sometimes it's a tough call.

Aunt Bee


Only the 65-70 half dollars are 40% silver. Swamp

Re: How Many People Know About 90% Coins?

PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2014 10:16 am
by daaswampman
beachbrratt wrote:I noticed some have mentioned buying 10 or 20 dollars worth of junk siver coins. Is there a rule of thumb or a price per coin that you pay for them? I would like to buy say 20 dollars at a time of junk silver but the pawn shop here is a flat *** crook. I would like to know what the going price is. As far as the pawn shop, is there a better place to buy them?


APMEX is a good company and they list their buy and sell prices. I only buy in person and for cash, but I check APMEX to give me a starting place. Unless you are familiar to the owner, pawn shops can be hard to deal with. Coin shops that deal in junk silver seem to be more realistic. Swamp

http://www.apmex.com/

Re: How Many People Know About 90% Coins?

PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2014 10:30 am
by beachbrratt
Thanks Swamp

Re: How Many People Know About 90% Coins?

PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2014 7:13 pm
by MrDanB
I use www.kitco.com . Aside from a "live'" spot price, they have tools to see past performance of all precious metals broken down by month, year, etc. For those wanting to learn about silver content in Gov minted coins: www.coinflation.com has good tools to learn "melt value".

Re: How Many People Know About 90% Coins?

PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2014 10:19 pm
by MoosePath
daaswampman wrote:
AuntBee wrote:I keep a separate jar of 1965-1975 dimes, nickels and quarters. As people have been saying, most people don't have a clue. These dates at least still have 40% and dont look or feel as chintzy as new coins. It seems like even those dates are becoming kind of scarce. Did the government recall coins that might have intrinsic value?

No idea how much is enough. I keep telling myself that bartering a can of soup will have more value than a handful of change, but then I keep reading about buying silver, silver, and more silver. Sometimes it's a tough call.

Aunt Bee


Only the 65-70 half dollars are 40% silver. Swamp

I believe that the Eisenhower dollars during those years are 40% as well.

Re: How Many People Know About 90% Coins?

PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 12:12 am
by AuntBee
daaswampman wrote:
Only the 65-70 half dollars are 40% silver. Swamp



Well...poop.

Aunt Bee

Re: How Many People Know About 90% Coins?

PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 12:50 am
by 11C1P
Most people don't even think a pure silver dollar is worth a dollar. They aren't called sheeple for nothing.


Re: How Many People Know About 90% Coins?

PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 12:56 am
by 11C1P
Also, you can get newer quarters that are 90%, they weren't circulated. I bought 2 rolls of these so far and they are gorgeous. They are in BU condition and actually cost a bit less than most pre-65 circulated quarters.

http://www.apmex.com/product/46944/10-p ... -coin-roll

Re: How Many People Know About 90% Coins?

PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 8:02 am
by RayMac1963
11C1P wrote:Most people don't even think a pure silver dollar is worth a dollar. They aren't called sheeple for nothing.




Where was i that day? I would take all i could friction carry. they would be tinkled. ;)

Re: How Many People Know About 90% Coins?

PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 10:55 am
by daaswampman
MoosePath wrote:
daaswampman wrote:
AuntBee wrote:I keep a separate jar of 1965-1975 dimes, nickels and quarters. As people have been saying, most people don't have a clue. These dates at least still have 40% and dont look or feel as chintzy as new coins. It seems like even those dates are becoming kind of scarce. Did the government recall coins that might have intrinsic value?

No idea how much is enough. I keep telling myself that bartering a can of soup will have more value than a handful of change, but then I keep reading about buying silver, silver, and more silver. Sometimes it's a tough call.

Aunt Bee


Only the 65-70 half dollars are 40% silver. Swamp

I believe that the Eisenhower dollars during those years are 40% as well.


Sorry none of the 65-70 have any silver. After that they have made a number of collector only issues with silver, but they were not for circulation. That is why it is very important to be familiar with silver. It does look and feel different. Not long ago I found a 2012 90% silver quarter in circulation. Yes they made them, but somebody broke down a proof set and somebody spent it. Cool! Swamp

Re: How Many People Know About 90% Coins?

PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 8:38 pm
by MoosePath
daaswampman wrote:
Sorry none of the 65-70 have any silver. After that they have made a number of collector only issues with silver, but they were not for circulation. That is why it is very important to be familiar with silver. It does look and feel different. Not long ago I found a 2012 90% silver quarter in circulation. Yes they made them, but somebody broke down a proof set and somebody spent it. Cool! Swamp


Thanks Swamp, I wasn't aware that they were not, I guess I have to watch who I listen too, bad advice. From now on I will double check what I am told.

Re: How Many People Know About 90% Coins?

PostPosted: Thu Jul 10, 2014 12:13 pm
by Zero Source
I don't know where the 1965-1970 dollars are 40% silver misunderstanding somes from, but it seems like the most common coin misunderstanding I hear. Maybe it is because the half dollars are?

Swamp, that is cool you found a new silver quarter in your change.

Personally, I do not buy new silver quarters. I think that would be even less well known than the silver content of pre 1965 coins.

Re: How Many People Know About 90% Coins?

PostPosted: Thu Jul 10, 2014 1:32 pm
by dmwalsh568
Misunderstanding coin values is why I only buy mercury dimes and franklin half dollars or walking liberty half dollars. No need to look at date markings, they can be identified at a glance by even poor eyesight. Getting old is tough on the eyes...but getting old beats the alternative. :shock:

Re: How Many People Know About 90% Coins?

PostPosted: Wed Aug 20, 2014 2:10 am
by ucan2do
90% Silver Coin Facts: The following is for commonly seen coins.

All dimes, quarters, and half dollars dated 1964 and earlier are 90% silver. In 1965 thru 1970 the half dollars were 40% silver. NO other coins contain any silver except as noted below.

Not so commonly seen coins which are silver include:

Dimes from 1992 to present available ONLY in silver proof sets sold by the US mint are 90% silver.
Quarters from 1999 to present available ONLY in silver proof sets sold by the US mint are 90% silver.
Half dollars from 1976 special sets available ONLY in proof sets sold by the US mint are 40% silver.
Half dollars from 1992 to present available ONLY in silver proof sets sold by the US mint are 90% silver.
Ike dollars from 1971 thru 1974 available ONLY in special sets sold by the US mint are 40% silver.
Ike dollars from 1976 special sets available ONLY in proof sets sold by the US mint are 40% silver

In addition, the nickels produced from 1942 thru 1945 are 35% silver. They are easily noted by the large mint mark above the dome on the back.

The 1 oz. silver eagles are NOT coins. They are sold by the US mint as bullion only.

This is the complete list of silver coinage produced by the US Mint that you might come across.

Hope this clears up any misunderstandings about what is silver and what is not.

Re: How Many People Know About 90% Coins?

PostPosted: Fri Apr 28, 2017 11:29 am
by John_Galt24
Not enough. I buy junk silver regularly.