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Vacuum Sealing Oatmeal

Vacuum Sealer discussions

Vacuum Sealing Oatmeal

Postby OkieTiger » Sun Jul 26, 2015 11:05 am

First of all, if this has been covered, and I missed it in my search, please forgive me. Just overlook the noob thing. ;)

I have made several vacuum sealed packets of quick cook oatmeal breakfasts, that are all inclusive. All I have to do is add to boiling water for one minute and serve. I know whole grains keep longer, but I am looking at an easy, less fuel used type breakfast, which is why I used one minute oatmeal. Here is the recipe, how I vacuum sealed, and my questions (since after a lot of reading I am unsure of if I went about this properly and don't want to find out the hard way by serving my family food with something like botulism spores in it.)

Recipe for one bag:

1 cup One Minute Oatmeal
2/3 cup powdered milk
2 T Brown Sugar
2 T dried fruit, chopped
pinch salt

Contents to be boiled for one minute in two cups of water. Serves two.

Preparation method: Sealed in plastic vacuum sealed bags with an oxygen absorber in each bag. 2-3 of these bags are sealed together in a larger plastic vacuum sealed bag for double layer sealing.

First of all, I have read that botulism can grow in grains even if vacuum sealed, and in another area read that it prefers an environment with less oxygen. I thought the reverse was true. So will my oatmeal keep by packaging this way? If so, how long do those of you with experience in vacuum sealing think it will keep? (For the record, I learned to can when I was a little girl, but the only vacuum sealing I have done is for short term things in the freezer. These packets are for room temperature storage in a large tote bin.)

The other question I have is I have read mylar is better at long term storage. Should I use mylar bags instead? If so, would you repackage removing oatmeal from plastic vacuum sealed bags currently in and starting over with mylar? Or do you think I could package what I already have by just putting the plastic vacuum sealed bags inside mylar bags and then sealing?

I do not have any experience with grains, so any advice is appreciated.

oh, on a side note, I did bags of beans, and bags of rice sealed the same way. I bought bulk and stored in smaller quantities, double sealing with an oxygen absorber in each small bag.

Thanks for any assistance and advice.
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Re: Vacuum Sealing Oatmeal

Postby PatrioticStabilist » Sun Jul 26, 2015 2:06 pm

I would be concerned about the powdered milk most then the fruit. The sugar no.

I just ordered 25 pounds of Bobs Red Meal steel cut oats. I then ordered 4 food safe buckets from Grainger. I will
vacuum seal them then put them in the buckets but I'm not adding anything.

You could put Milnot or evaporated milk away for use. I prefer the least processed foods and steel cut are it.
I don't care for oatmeal that much but I'm eating it as it lowered my cholesterol 36 points so I'm eating it. ANd
its very good for you.
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Re: Vacuum Sealing Oatmeal

Postby SGT_E » Sun Jul 26, 2015 3:31 pm

I Vac seal everything separate in Ball Jars....My fruit may mold...my milk may turn rancid but at least my oatmeal and sugar will be fine! better half a meal than none!
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Re: Vacuum Sealing Oatmeal

Postby Illini Warrior » Sun Jul 26, 2015 3:39 pm

the vacuum on the poly bags only lasts 6 months on the outside .... you really don't get the 02 level that low using a vac sealer - nothing near the percentage like 02 absorbers ....

strictly short term usage - like a semester school term or a hiking trip ..... the plastic is too porous

in regard to what you're trying to do ... don't .... you don't mix ingredients with different storage capabilities & qualities .... if it was a credible product - Don't you think the food companies would have it on the shelves????
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Re: Vacuum Sealing Oatmeal

Postby OkieTiger » Sun Jul 26, 2015 5:48 pm

Thanks for all the info and advice.

I got the idea from the packages of instant add boiling water on the shelves of the supermarket of oats, nuts/fruit, and sugar. But i forgot they don't have the milk in them.

I guess i should just package smaller quantities of oats that i get in bulk, same for powdered milk, and measure/make the oatmeal having all ingredients separate. Small bags of dried fruit to keep on hand are easy enough to find.

For packaging oatmeal alone and powdered milk alone, would you use mylar vacuum sealed with oxygen absorbers, and how long would each keep?

Because I just made several a few days ago, I guess we will be having a lot of oatmeal for breakfast over the next few weeks.
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Re: Vacuum Sealing Oatmeal

Postby OkieTiger » Sun Jul 26, 2015 5:58 pm

Also, how long will the bean last, bagged alone, and the rice bagged alone, last? Both are vacuum sealed with 02 absorbers.
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Re: Vacuum Sealing Oatmeal

Postby jean11 » Tue Jul 28, 2015 12:36 am

Your white rice will last about 20 years when packaged in mylar with o2 absorbers. Beans will last several years packaged in the same manner but may turn a little harder with time. I place the sealed mylar bags in 5 gal. buckets for long term storage. Powdered milk may have a storage life of 1 to 3 years at room temperature, so that should be stored separately (not with the oatmeal). It will have a longer storage life if stored in the refrig or freezer. White flour also has a rather short storage life, maybe 1-3 years also. Better yet, buy your milk from Honeyville, or other dehydrated foods distributor. Packaged in a #10 can it will last about 10 years unopened. One year if opened. And it tastes great.
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Re: Vacuum Sealing Oatmeal

Postby OkieTiger » Tue Jul 28, 2015 11:13 am

Thanks on the Honeyville suggestion. I have always kept my powdered milk, and all my grains, in the freezer. I am searching for a way to keep things like that in case there is no electricity for an extended period of time.
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Re: Vacuum Sealing Oatmeal

Postby broden » Tue Jul 28, 2015 4:55 pm

we store a lot of oatmeal.. it is so incredibly useful

we put 3 pounds in a vac bag

we really store pretty much all of our ingredients separately..

for a few reasons

not sure how different ingredients might react stored together

and mostly cause it gives us the most flexibility to how we will use them when we do decide to use them
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Re: Vacuum Sealing Oatmeal

Postby MolanLabe24 » Mon Nov 06, 2017 4:32 pm

Hello all,
first day here and I had a newbie though.as I'm getting ready to start my bulk preps like oatmeal and such I was going to package them in more family sized containers then put all of those in one big mylar bag and seal it up then finally in a 5 gal bucket,does anyone else do this?i have a 3 month supply of prepackaged meals currently but wanting to go farther now.tons of great info on here and I look forward to talking with you all...
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Re: Vacuum Sealing Oatmeal

Postby Illini Warrior » Mon Nov 06, 2017 8:25 pm

MolanLabe24 wrote:Hello all,
first day here and I had a newbie though.as I'm getting ready to start my bulk preps like oatmeal and such I was going to package them in more family sized containers then put all of those in one big mylar bag and seal it up then finally in a 5 gal bucket,does anyone else do this?i have a 3 month supply of prepackaged meals currently but wanting to go farther now.tons of great info on here and I look forward to talking with you all...



you can't be sub-dividing the bucket that way - firstly only the food goes in the mylar bag and the 02 absorber needs to act on the entire bag - there can't be air voids within ....

why can't you simply fill the mylar bag and worry about dividing it out when the bucket is cracked open post-SHTF?
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Re: Vacuum Sealing Oatmeal

Postby daaswampman » Mon Nov 06, 2017 11:35 pm

I put all dry goods in quart sized portions in Mylar bags with 02 packs. These are placed in buckets for physical protection. It is more work upfront, but much easier to inspect and rotate. I have been doing this for some time and not everything you read is entirely reliable in every situation.

Even white rice can get very hard and grainy even after long periods of soaking and cooking. Same thing with any grains or beans. Other things may last much longer than conventional wisdom states.

I would rather check and know, than blindly follow internet wisdom! It would be a real bummer to be hungry and find those guru claims were not entirely true or a critter turned your PVC bucket into a condo! I am grateful I was able to learn from someone else's mistakes. Swamp
People rarely notice what it right in front of their eyes. The Da Vinci Code
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Re: Vacuum Sealing Oatmeal

Postby jean11 » Tue Nov 07, 2017 1:58 am

I think we all start packing our foods one way - and then shift to another method later. I started by lining the 5 gallon pail with mylar, then pouring in oatmeal, or flour, or beans, etc. Two or three years later I realized It would be smarter to put Oatmeal, etc. in gallon sized vacuum seal bags and vacuum out all of the air and seal. This gives me portions I can handle. Another mistake I made was buying Pinto beans. They were cheap and plentiful. Later I learned that they take a lot longer to cook, meaning, they use a lot more propane/gas to cook them. They also turn very hard when they get older. I now buy Navy beans which are white and smaller. They cook faster, and I like the taste.
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