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EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

Postby PatrioticStabilist » Wed Jul 26, 2017 11:07 am

Say a prayer for all those on the Korean peninsula. We have many fine soldiers there serving to
protect those folks.

Not a good situation.
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

Postby ReadyMom » Thu Jul 27, 2017 9:40 pm

"Hawaii is the first state to announce a public campaign urging those living there to prepare for a nuclear attack. " :o

As N. Korea missile threat looms, Hawaii bunker may play key role
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/hawaii-nort ... ness-plan/



People in Hawaii are keeping a close eye on North Korea Thursday morning. The Pentagon reportedly detected signs that the country could launch another missile test.

North Korea's last Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (IBM) test caused global alarm and experts say Alaska and Hawaii could be in range. Hawaii is the first state to announce a public campaign urging those living there to prepare for a nuclear attack.

CBS News correspondent Carter Evans reports a bunker, located under more than 1000 feet of rock, could soon be used as an ideal place to ride out a nuclear attack.

Every time North Korea fires a missile, the regime gets one step closer to reaching the Hawaiian Islands.

"In the last two years, there was 56 missile launches," State Representative Gene Ward said. "That is a wake-up call."

Ward says it would take less than 20 minutes for a nuclear missile to reach Honolulu -- something state officials want the nearly 1.5 million people who live in the islands to prepare for.

"The first thing that we are responsible for is the security of our people," Ward said. "At least to keep the government running, and that's the important part of it."

In the event of a nuclear emergency, Ward wants key government officials to have a safe place to operate, beneath Diamond Head. The jewel of Wakiki houses a little-known network of tunnels the military has used for more than a century.

Lt. Col. Charles Anthony is with the National Guard. He showed Evans the labyrinth of concrete tunnels and bunkers built into the dormant volcano. He says there are no plans to use them as a shelter.

"It was designed to withstand an artillery barrage and also to unleash an artillery barrage in the opposite direction," Anthony said. "But this was not really designed for people. This was designed for equipment, material and weapons."

Every vital public service in the islands can be controlled from within these two miles of air conditioned tunnels. Back in the 1950s, the government turned these old ammunition storage rooms in the tunnels into a civil defense hub.

To date, the state's emergency operation center runs 24-7 in an underground bunker nearby.

Retired General Vern Miyagi is in charge of the state's emergency management agency. He says he doesn't expect those 1950s-era civil defense drills.

Emergency officials believe the majority of the population would survive the initial explosion. What they need to be prepared for is the nuclear fallout and to stay inside for up to two weeks.

"What we're focused on right now is shelter in place," Miyagi said. "The idea is to figure out ahead of time where you are, where your family is, and what is the best type of shelter that they can get to at that time of the day."

What everyone is concerned about is the impact all this talk of preparing for a nuclear attack could have on tourism. The economy relies heavily on the 9 million visitors who come to Hawaii every year.

The local government wants everyone to know Hawaii is still open for business.
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

Postby ReadyMom » Thu Jul 27, 2017 10:04 pm

How North Korea is prompting new efforts to prepare for a nuclear attack
http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/duck-a ... Kw?ocid=sf

Fleets of big black trucks, harbor boats and aircraft, equipped with radiation sensors and operated by specially trained law enforcement teams, are ready to swing into action in Los Angeles for a catastrophe that nobody even wants to think about: a North Korean nuclear attack.

American cities have long prepared for a terrorist attack, even one involving nuclear weapons or a "dirty bomb," but North Korea's long-range missile and weapons programs have now heightened concerns along the West Coast over increasing vulnerability to a strike.

"We monitor events all over the world and assess whether there is something that could impact us here," said Capt. Leonard McCray, commander of the emergency operations bureau at the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. "North Korea is clearly one of them."

As tension rises, the inevitable question is: How well-prepared are U.S. cities for a nuclear strike? The answer is somewhat unexpected. After two decades of fighting terrorism, law enforcement agencies and the federal government today are better equipped and trained to handle the aftermath of a limited nuclear attack than they ever were during the Cold War. Yet generations of Americans have grown up without learning how to protect themselves in the aftermath of a detonation.

Still, recent events have jolted emergency response agencies and prompted some to fine- tune their preparations.
A string of underground nuclear weapons tests and increasingly sophisticated missile flights have led analysts to conclude that North Korea already has the capability of sending a warhead to Alaska and possibly Hawaii. Within one or two years, based on its stunning rate of progress, North Korea should have Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle and Portland, Ore., within range, said David Wright, a weapons expert at the Union of Concerned Scientists.

The U.S. has long tried to stop North Korea's ascent as a nuclear power, but the national policy has largely sidestepped the question of how vulnerable U.S. cities are to a surprise attack and how much capability localities should develop to respond to a blast and radioactive fallout.

The U.S. abandoned its massive civil defense program near the end of the Cold War after realizing that any limited nuclear exchange with the Soviet Union would very likely escalate into a full-scale holocaust that would involve hundreds of nuclear weapon detonations. It seemed futile for people to try to survive such a catastrophe in public fallout shelters.

But the North Korean threat is different. The Pyongyang government may have only a dozen nuclear weapons, most of them unsuited for a missile delivery.
"People think everybody would perish, but that is not the case," said Matthew LoPresti, a legislator in Hawaii who has been active in preparing for an attack there. "It would be a mass casualty event, but most people would survive. If you don't take steps, more people will lose their lives."

One ingredient that seems to be missing is a public awareness campaign that tells people what to do, said Dr. Robert Levin, chief health officer of Ventura County.

"We can save hundreds of thousands of lives," said Levin, who has spearheaded one of the nation's few major programs to draw up a detailed response plan for a nuclear attack. "We assume an attack would be on Los Angeles, but it will have impact on Ventura County because we would have millions of people fleeing this way and a radioactive plume that could reach over us."

The county has written a 252-page nuclear response plan that deals with issues such as fallout (radiation levels drop 80 percent in the first day) to the management of dead bodies. Levin also developed a public awareness campaign, gaining strong support from local political leaders. One public service message shows a mushroom cloud and an actor singing, "Oh no, it's blown, the cloud is in the sky. ... You don't need to be scared, you don't need to be loud, because you can survive even a mushroom cloud."

The civil defense work done by Ventura County is exceedingly rare, said Alex Wellerstein, a nuclear weapons historian and assistant professor at the Stevens Institute of Technology in New Jersey.

There has been little public discourse since the Cold War about the consequences of nuclear threats, he said. As a result, an entire generation has grown up with little awareness of the danger posed by nuclear weapons.

This month, Wellerstein and other researchers launched Reinventing Civil Defense, a nonprofit project that over the next two years will examine how best to reeducate the American public on the nuclear threat — one that never went away. It is being funded by a $500,000 grant from Carnegie Corp. of New York.
"If we live in a world where a nuclear detonation is possible, and we do, then people should be informed on what that means," he said. "It's something that's been nonexistent in our society since the late 1980s."

The reluctance to prepare reflects what LoPresti calls a "generational PTSD" from the decades of living under the threat of instant thermonuclear war. "It is not something people are comfortable talking about," he said.

LoPresti, chairman of the Asian studies program at Hawaii Pacific University and a philosophy professor, has sought to raise awareness of the dangers and push for some preparations. His own district would be within the fallout zone of an attack on Pearl Harbor, possibly the most important symbol of national security complacency.

Wright, the nuclear weapons expert at the Union of Concerned Scientists, said North Korea's most recent missile test demonstrated a two-stage rocket that could reach Anchorage and Guam. But he expects that within one to two years North Korea will have enough reach to hit Seattle, 4,900 miles away, and then Los Angeles, 5,800 miles from its launch sites.

"They seem to be doing things in the right way and more professionally, which is worrisome," Wright said. "They seem to have assembled a team of engineers who are solving their problems."

But the task ahead will be increasingly difficult, particularly preventing a warhead from drifting far off target as it re-enters the atmosphere. Wright said North Korea would be lucky to land a bomb within 10 miles of a target. Even such a crude device could be effective against a city as spread out as Los Angeles.
An official at the Energy Department, the steward of U.S. nuclear weapons and its nonproliferation programs, acknowledged that it does not monitor what cities and states around the nation are doing. But if an attack does occur, it would be ready to send significant technical assistance from its national laboratories.

The main responsibility would lie with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which declined to provide an official to discuss the issue and did not answer written questions.

If the bright flash of a nuclear bomb ever lights the Los Angeles sky, it will be law enforcement and firefighters who would inevitably be the first responders.
The sheriff's special enforcement bureau, atop a hill overlooking the 710 Freeway, has special trucks with advanced radiological sensors that can scan radiation levels as they drive through neighborhoods, quickly assessing the danger, said Capt. Jack Ewell, commander of the bureau. Terrorism still poses a bigger threat, he said, but "we train and equip ourselves for any threat."

Every station in the county has radiological dosimeters, which tell radiation levels. A team of deputies has trained with federal authorities on nuclear weapons effects. The department has radiological assessment equipment on aircraft and patrol boats in the harbor as well. It would receive federal and local weather assessments that could predict fallout patterns.

"If we are dealing with a situation where there was a nuclear attack from North Korea, we are talking about an air burst that would devastate a large area," McCray, the emergency operations commander, said.

"One advantage in our area is that we are resource rich," he said. "I am convinced we would have a robust response. We don't have the ability to do anything at ground zero, but we do have the ability to help at the perimeter. We have 10 million people in this county and there would be quite a few people to look after."

An exercise is being planned in November that will test the department's ability to respond to a range of emergencies that require mass care and sheltering. "Absolutely the exercise would help us prepare for a North Korean attack, but the same would go for a terrorist attack," McCray said.

Some arms control experts say it would be a mistake to launch a full-scale civil defense effort in response to North Korea. Wright, the expert at the Union of Concerned Scientists, said such a response would send the wrong message that North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un has put a dent in U.S. confidence.
Jeffrey Lewis, a nuclear weapons analyst with the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies in Monterey, Calif., said Kim presents the same threat that existed throughout most of the last century. "He's ruthless, but he's not crazy," Lewis said. "There's reason to be cautious. But it's not a reason to start digging bomb shelters."

But Levin, the Ventura County health director, argues that doing nothing is equally wrong. The key point of the Ventura plan is to ask residents not flee, but to "get inside and stay inside" immediately after a detonation.

The county's plan was developed with technical assistance from Brooke Buddemeier, a nuclear weapons effects expert at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. He has made the case that sheltering indoors for just 24 hours after a detonation provides significantly reduced exposure.

"Talking about nuclear detonation is not one of those topics you can bring up at a cocktail party," Buddemeier said. "But a little knowledge can save a lot of lives."
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #3 (JUNE 2017)

Postby theoutback » Fri Jul 28, 2017 6:20 pm

The little fat kid does it again!

http://news.trust.org/item/20170728153821-9ad8x
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #3 (JUNE 2017)

Postby Mollypup » Fri Jul 28, 2017 11:05 pm

Well of course he did. Why not?

If we were truly going to stop him & put an end to it, we'd have already done it by now.
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #3 (JUNE 2017)

Postby daaswampman » Fri Jul 28, 2017 11:42 pm

OMG now it is a big deal! He has been saber rattling for years and has done exactly nothing! Stop giving the brat attention, he is not going to do anything that will get him vaporized. Swamp
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

Postby ReadyMom » Mon Jul 31, 2017 9:25 am

US warns Pyongyang 'time for talk is over' as bombers fly over Korean skies
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/07 ... ly-korean/

Harriet Alexander, New York

30 July 2017 • 9:45pm

The United States' ambassador to the UN has said there is "no point" in having an emergency session at the Security Council to discuss North Korea, warning the rogue regime that "the time for talk is over".

Kim Jong-un, North Korea's ruler, personally oversaw the launch on Friday of the country's second intercontinental ballistic missile test this month. The missile is believed by the Pentagon to be capable of reaching mainland USA.

Mr Kim's government said on Sunday that the test was designed as "a stern warning" against further sanctions.

"The test-fire of ICBM this time is meant to send a stern warning to the US making senseless remarks, being lost to reason in the frantic sanctions and pressure campaign against the DPRK," it said.

The test sparked deep consternation in the US, with calls for an emergency session at the UN.

But Nikki Haley, US ambassador to the UN, said it was a waste of time.

"North Korea is already subject to numerous Security Council resolutions that they violate with impunity and that are not complied with by all UN Member States," she said, in a statement issued on Sunday.

"An additional Security Council resolution that does not significantly increase the international pressure on North Korea is of no value. In fact, it is worse than nothing, because it sends the message to the North Korean dictator that the international community is unwilling to seriously challenge him."

She reiterated President Donald Trump's view that China must do more to rein in the pariah state - China being its main trading partner and protector.

He tweeted on Saturday that they "do NOTHING" to rebuke Pyongyang.

Mrs Haley said that China must now condemn North Korea for its repeated missile tests.

"China must decide whether it is finally willing to take this vital step," she said.

"The time for talk is over. The danger the North Korean regime poses to international peace is now clear to all."

Earlier on Saturday the US flew two supersonic bombers over the Korean Peninsula.

The B-1 bombers were escorted by South Korean fighter jets as they performed a low-pass over an air base near the South Korean capital of Seoul before returning to Andersen Air Force Base in Guam.
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

Postby ReadyMom » Mon Jul 31, 2017 9:31 am

Opinion Commentary

Kim Jong Un Is Going Ballistic in More Ways Than One
https://www.wsj.com/articles/kim-jong-u ... 1501446238

North Korea has developed advanced short-range weapons and is almost certain to export them.

By Henry Sokolski and
Zachary Keck
July 30, 2017 4:23 p.m. ET
26 COMMENTS

Among the many types of missiles North Korea is perfecting is a short-range system that Kim Jong Un is almost certain to export. Although not as worrisome as the intercontinental ballistic missile Pyongyang tested last Friday, this weapon has a highly accurate front end optimized to knock out overseas U.S. and allied bases, Persian Gulf oil fields, key Israeli assets and eventually even commercial shipping and warships. The good news is there’s still time to halt the system’s proliferation, but only if we act quickly.

The missile in question is an advanced version of a Scud, a 185- to 620-mile-range missile that has been in use world-wide for decades. What makes the version North Korea just tested so different is that it has a maneuvering re-entry vehicle, or MaRV, which allows the missile’s warhead to maneuver late in flight both to evade missile defenses and achieve pinpoint accuracy. China, Russia, the U.S. and South Korea have all tested MaRVs but decided, so far, not to export them. Iran has also tested a MaRV, raising questions about Tehran’s possible cooperation with Pyongyang.

The worry now is how far and quickly this technology might spread. Pyongyang has already sold ballistic missiles to seven countries, including Iran, Syria and Saddam Hussein’s Iraq. These sales generate precious hard currency for the Kim regime, which is otherwise difficult to come by as Washington continues to ratchet up sanctions.

Pyongyang will have no trouble finding customers. While only Iran or Pakistan might consider purchasing a North Korean ICBM, 15 countries besides North Korea already possess older Scud missile systems they might want to upgrade. Getting a MaRV version would be an affordable way to threaten targets that previously could have been knocked out only by a nuclear warhead or scores of missiles.

If Syria—which previously purchased Scuds from North Korea—were to acquire this missile, it would need only a handful to wipe out the bases the U.S. uses to launch airstrikes within its borders. Rebels in Yemen have repeatedly fired Scuds at Saudi air bases. Most have either missed their targets or been shot down by Saudi forces. A MaRV would ensure a successful strike. If Hezbollah, a North Korean arms customer, got its hands on the new system, it could make good on its threats to take out Israeli chemical plants and the Dimona nuclear reactor. Eventually, if paired with capable surveillance systems, MaRV Scuds could even be used against moving targets such as warships or oil tankers.

If these missiles spread, hostile nations and terror groups won’t need nuclear weapons to threaten America or its allies. They will be able to upgrade their threat level by merely trading up the Scuds they already have.

What should the Trump administration do about this? First, start talking more candidly about the threat. The U.S. Navy has been clear that it’s now vulnerable to China’s highly precise conventional MaRV missiles. Our government now needs to spotlight the threat North Korea’s MaRV Scuds will pose if these systems proliferate globally.

Second, along with developing defenses to cope with this threat, the U.S. needs to double down on blocking illicit missile exports. In 1987 Ronald Reagan worked with the Group of Seven nations to create the international Missile Technology Control Regime, which today urges missile suppliers (including Russia and China) not to export missiles capable of lifting 1,100 pounds for distances over 185 miles—precisely the type that North Korea might sell. The MTCR also serves as the basis for the 105-nation Proliferation Security Initiative, which allows countries to search ships and airplanes carrying proscribed missile technology. These tools for stifling the illegal trade of missiles have already been developed. It’s time to hone and use them.

Finally, America must get serious about restricting missile sales more generally. President Reagan wanted to eliminate what he called “nuclear missiles.” His efforts to do so—the MTCR and the Intermediate Nuclear Forces Treaty, which banned an entire class of ground-based nuclear-capable missiles—suggest he was focused on eliminating missiles ideally suited for surprise first strikes. Given that today’s missiles are accurate enough to destroy their intended targets with conventional warheads, it’s time to update our thinking in this area.

Persuading the world’s major powers to sign on to new missile-trade restrictions will be no simple feat. Russia, for one, has already violated the existing INF Treaty. Yet before this violation, Moscow proposed expanding the INF to include other countries, especially China, the world’s largest land-based missile power. Bringing all parties to the table in good faith will be a long-term proposition. But given the missile threats that are already emerging, the time to begin is now.

Mr. Sokolski is executive director and Mr. Keck a fellow at the Nonproliferation Policy Education Center.
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

Postby ReadyMom » Mon Jul 31, 2017 9:43 am

US, allies prepared to use 'overwhelming force' in North Korea, general says
http://www.foxnews.com/world/2017/07/30 ... -says.html

Published July 30, 2017

The U.S. and its allies are prepared to use “rapid, lethal and overwhelming force,” if necessary, against North Korea, the commander of the U.S. Pacific Air Forces warned Saturday night.

The statement from Gen. Terrence J. O’Shaughnessy, U.S. Pacific Air Forces commander, came after the militaries of the U.S., South Korea and Japan spent 10 hours conducting bomber-jet drills over the Korean Peninsula.

The training mission was a response to North Korea’s recent ballistic missile launches and nuclear program, and part of the U.S. regular commitment to defending its allies in the Asia-Pacific region, the general’s statement said.

"The time for talk is over. The danger the North Korean regime poses to international peace is now clear to all," said United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley in a statement.

Statement by Ambassador Haley on North Korea

Following North Korea's second ICBM launch on Friday, many have asked whether the United
States will seek an emergency security Council session on Monday. Some have even misreported
that we are seeking such a session. That is mistaken.

There is no point in having an emergency session if it produces nothing of consequence. North
Korea is already subject to numerous Security Council resolutions that they violate with impunity
and that are not complied with by all UN Member States. An additional Security Council
resolution that does not significantly increase the international pressure on North Korea is of no
value. In fact, it is worse than nothing, because it sends the message tp the North Korean dictator
that the international community is unwilling to seriously challenge him. China Must decide
whether it is finally willing to take this vital step. The time for talk is over. The danger the North
Korean regime poses to international peach is no clear to all.


“North Korea remains the most urgent threat to regional stability,” O’Shaughnessy said.

“Diplomacy remains the lead,” he said. “However, we have a responsibility to our allies and our nation to showcase our unwavering commitment while planning for the worst-case scenario.

“If called upon,” he added, “we are ready to respond with rapid, lethal and overwhelming force at a time and place of our choosing.”

North Korea conducted test launches of ICBMs on July 3 and July 28, and has claimed that its weapons can now reach the U.S. mainland.

The country’s recent actions have drawn condemnation from President Trump, and prompted U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson to confer with counterparts from South Korea and Japan to develop a response, Fox News has reported.

Both Trump and Tillerson have criticized China, saying the Beijing government has failed to use its influence to discourage North Korea from developing its nuclear program, Fox News reported.

On Saturday, two U.S. Air Force B-1B bombers, under the command of U.S. Pacific Air Forces, joined counterparts from the South Korean and Japanese air forces in sequenced bilateral missions.

According to the Pentagon, the U.S. bombers took off from Andersen Air Force Base in Guam, then flew to Japanese airspace, where they were joined by two Koku Jieitai (Japan Air Self Defense Force) F-2 fighter jets.

The B-1s then flew over the Korean Peninsula, where they were joined by four F-15 fighter jets from the South Korean air force.

The B-1s then performed a low-pass over Osan Air Base, South Korea, before leaving South Korean airspace and returning to Guam.

Throughout the approximately 10-hour mission, the air crews practiced intercept and formation functions, enabling them to improve their combined capabilities and strengthening the long-standing military-to-military relationships in the region, the Pentagon said.

U.S. Pacific Command maintains flexible bomber and fighter capabilities in the Indo-Asia-Pacific theater, retaining the ability to quickly respond to any regional threat in order to defend the U.S. and its allies, the statement said.
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

Postby ReadyMom » Mon Jul 31, 2017 9:47 am

Related to post, above:

US deploys supersonic bombers in show of force to North Korea
http://news.sky.com/story/boris-johnson ... h-10967119

An air force general warns that the US stands ready to respond to North Korea with "rapid, lethal and overwhelming force".

Two US bombers have been flown over the Korean Peninsula in a show of force after North Korea's latest missile test.

The supersonic B-1 bombers took off from an airbase in Guam and were joined by Japanese and South Korean fighter jets, performing a low-pass near Seoul.

The manoeuvre came in response to an intercontinental ballistic missile test by Kim Jong Un's regime, which experts say now puts several major US cities in firing range.

"North Korea remains the most urgent threat to regional stability," said General Terrence J O'Shaughnessy, Pacific Air Forces commander.

"Diplomacy remains the lead," he said, but added: "If called upon, we are ready to respond with rapid, lethal, and overwhelming force at a time and place of our choosing."

UK Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson made a similar vow that Britain would stand by its ally in the face of the latest threat.

He said: "The UK strongly condemns North Korea's second test of an intercontinental ballistic missile and calls on the regime to immediately stop all activity that breaches UN Security Council resolutions.

"The UK will stand alongside our allies and partners as we confront the growing threat North Korea poses to regional and international security. Once again North Korea shows no regard for its international obligations.

"We urge the DPRK regime to put the well-being of its own people ahead of the illegal pursuit of nuclear and ballistic missile programmes."

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, who personally supervised the launch of the missile on Friday night, said it served as a "stern warning" for the US.

It is the second ICBM launch in less than a month by the North, despite international efforts to curb the development of missile technology by the nuclear-armed authoritarian state.

US President Donald Trump said: "By threatening the world, these weapons and tests further isolate North Korea, weaken its economy, and deprive its people.

"The United States will take all necessary steps to ensure the security of the American homeland and protect our allies in the region."

He also criticised China for not doing enough to rein in Pyongyang's nuclear programme.

He tweeted: "I am very disappointed in China. Our foolish past leaders have allowed them to make hundreds of billions of dollars a year in trade, yet they do NOTHING for us with North Korea, just talk.

"We will no longer allow this to continue. China could easily solve this problem!"

The US military will also roll out "strategic assets" to the South, Seoul's defence minister said.

It follows the deployment in South Korea of the US missile defence system known as THAAD, which has angered China.

Beijing's ministry of foreign affairs said in a statement on Saturday: "China expresses serious concern about the actions of the Republic of Korea.

"China's resolute opposition to the deployment by the USA of the THAAD system in South Korea is consistent and clear.

"The THAAD system deployment cannot solve South Korea's security concerns, neither can it solve the problems facing the Korean peninsula.

"It will only make these problems more complicated."
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

Postby ReadyMom » Mon Jul 31, 2017 9:49 am

U.S. conducts "successful" test of THAAD anti-missile system
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/u-s-conduct ... ak-alaska/

The U.S. successfully conducted a missile defense test Sunday using a Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) anti-missile system in Alaska, the U.S. Missile Defense Agency (MDA) said in a statement.

The U.S. Air Force launched a medium-range ballistic missile over the Pacific Ocean, and the THAAD system -- in Kodiak, Alaska -- "detected, tracked and intercepted the target," according to the MDA's statement.

Sunday's test marked the 15th successful intercept out of 15 THAAD tests, and it was carried out to collect "threat data" from an interceptor, the MDA said.

The data collected will improve the Missile Defense Agency's "ability to stay ahead of the evolving threat," MDA Director Lt. Gen. Sam Greaves said in the agency's statement.

The THAAD test follows North Korea's second test-launch of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM), which took place late Friday night. North Korea's first ICBM test was conducted on July 4 -- a launch that former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Bill Richardson, described to CBS News as a "game changer" because Kim Jong Un is "basically saying to President Trump 'come at me.'"

In direct response to both launches, two U.S. Air Force B-1 bombers flew over the Korean Peninsula over the weekend. The mission was "in response to North Korea's ballistic missile and nuclear programs," and "part of the continuing demonstration of ironclad U.S. commitment to our allies," U.S. Pacific Air Forces said in a statement.

"North Korea remains the most urgent threat to regional stability," Gen. Terrence J. O'Shaughnessy, Pacific Air Forces commander, said in the statement. "Diplomacy remains the lead; however, we have a responsibility to our allies and our nation to showcase our unwavering commitment while planning for the worst-case scenario."

"If called upon, we are ready to respond with rapid, lethal, and overwhelming force at a time and place of our choosing," he added.

Earlier this year, the U.S. installed a THAAD system in South Korea. It is now operating and can defend against North Korean missiles, the U.S. military said in May.

The THAAD weapons system is strictly for defensive measures and uses "hit-to-kill technology" to destroy targets, the MDA said.
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

Postby theoutback » Mon Jul 31, 2017 3:33 pm

Save all the posts RM, evidently there is nothing to worry about.
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