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New but slowly making progress

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New but slowly making progress

Postby slim4182 » Fri Sep 01, 2017 12:48 pm

Having a family with four kids under 8 makes this all seem very scary and daunting. I have slowly stock piled enough water for 2 weeks and have some other basic tools and supplies. My next step was getting some type of freeze dried food for 2 weeks. Its all a little overwhelming due to the amount of money that this could take to prepare to keep a family of six prepared and safe. I'm trying to take my time and do a little at a time but I feel like I want to go spend a thousand dollars and buy everything. This website has been helpful and I appreciate the plan people lay out to start prepping in the beginning stages.
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Re: New but slowly making progress

Postby PatrioticStabilist » Fri Sep 01, 2017 8:30 pm

I don't know if you could do it with kids so young. But could you raise a garden and can food or dry some of
it, would save on grocery bills also. Never hurts to have food and supplies extra.
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Re: New but slowly making progress

Postby mizery0317 » Sat Sep 02, 2017 12:50 am

Do not get overwhelmed. Fight the urge to prep yourself straight into the poor house. Prepping is a journey that surprisingly has no end so why rush. By being on this website you are already ahead of the majority of the population so pat yourself on the back. I completely agree with PatrioticStabilist gardening is a great way to start stock piling and a staple of prepping. It is very rewarding and a great way to get the young ones involved into prepping. Hunting season is also coming up so yourself could pack your freezer or i'm sure you could find someone that would be willing to give you the meat. if you are looking to go the freeze dried route look for sales that are going on they are a great way to start stocking up. Regardless congrats on completing as much as you have. "stay humble"
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Re: New but slowly making progress

Postby RockinB » Sat Sep 02, 2017 6:28 am

Welcome to your new reality. Slow progress is better than no progress. You're likely ahead of 95% of the huddled masses just with the fact of knowing many things can happen that you have zero control over. You can obtain food insurance with one trip to the store and much cheaper with dried staples. Rice & beans are cheap (i'm not a gourmet prepper) and you can get more than a few weeks of basic food security for your family well under $50 while you plan things out and decide which way you need to go.

Good luck out there!
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Re: New but slowly making progress

Postby Illini Warrior » Sat Sep 02, 2017 7:26 am

mizery0317 wrote:Do not get overwhelmed. Fight the urge to prep yourself straight into the poor house. Prepping is a journey that surprisingly has no end so why rush. By being on this website you are already ahead of the majority of the population so pat yourself on the back. I completely agree with PatrioticStabilist gardening is a great way to start stock piling and a staple of prepping. It is very rewarding and a great way to get the young ones involved into prepping. Hunting season is also coming up so yourself could pack your freezer or i'm sure you could find someone that would be willing to give you the meat. if you are looking to go the freeze dried route look for sales that are going on they are a great way to start stocking up. Regardless congrats on completing as much as you have. "stay humble"



decades ago I'd agreed with your ''has no end why rush'' assessment - these days - with the watch second hand counting down to zero on a whole handful of SHTFs - that are actually beyond the major SHTF category - give your prepping plan a good wholesome kick in rear ... if you have some resources that you can kick into the pot or put aside more time - now's the time ....
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Re: New but slowly making progress

Postby Hiker72 » Sat Sep 02, 2017 7:54 am

slim4182 wrote:Having a family with four kids under 8 makes this all seem very scary and daunting. I have slowly stock piled enough water for 2 weeks and have some other basic tools and supplies. My next step was getting some type of freeze dried food for 2 weeks. Its all a little overwhelming due to the amount of money that this could take to prepare to keep a family of six prepared and safe. I'm trying to take my time and do a little at a time but I feel like I want to go spend a thousand dollars and buy everything. This website has been helpful and I appreciate the plan people lay out to start prepping in the beginning stages.



I would concentrate on getting your pantry completely set up - canned goods will last far past the expiration date, plus with 6 family members buying in bulk is a great way to save money without LOOKING like you are "crazy" prepper. You can keep adding to your stores this way while continuing to research and setting aside money to purchase freeze dried/dehydrated food. For what it's worth, I only buy Mountain House brand. You could buy a few pouches of them at Wal-mart's camping section and see if the family likes it.
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Re: New but slowly making progress

Postby RockinB » Sun Sep 03, 2017 8:26 am

I agree with Illini Warrior. Now is not a very good time to relax and take it easy.
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Re: New but slowly making progress

Postby PatrioticStabilist » Sun Sep 03, 2017 9:05 am

Supposedly N Korea exploded a nuclear device, that crazy guy is going to drag the world into nuclear
conflict I fear. He will be wiped out in doing so but the aftermath of everyone else shooting stuff off
will contaminate the world for years to come. That I worry about.
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Re: New but slowly making progress

Postby DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE » Sun Sep 03, 2017 10:27 am

Hiker72 wrote:
slim4182 wrote:Having a family with four kids under 8 makes this all seem very scary and daunting. I have slowly stock piled enough water for 2 weeks and have some other basic tools and supplies. My next step was getting some type of freeze dried food for 2 weeks. Its all a little overwhelming due to the amount of money that this could take to prepare to keep a family of six prepared and safe. I'm trying to take my time and do a little at a time but I feel like I want to go spend a thousand dollars and buy everything. This website has been helpful and I appreciate the plan people lay out to start prepping in the beginning stages.



I would concentrate on getting your pantry completely set up - canned goods will last far past the expiration date, plus with 6 family members buying in bulk is a great way to save money without LOOKING like you are "crazy" prepper. You can keep adding to your stores this way while continuing to research and setting aside money to purchase freeze dried/dehydrated food. For what it's worth, I only buy Mountain House brand. You could buy a few pouches of them at Wal-mart's camping section and see if the family likes it.



You've gotten some great advice here all around...The canned food route will be the quickest supply that you can actually use as well so you're not wasting money...Rotation gives you day-to-day food for the family and you will be growing your supply at the same time very inexpensively. ALDI and dollar stores, Costco, Wallmart, etc will get you bulk quick and cheap.

While Illini and RockinB are absolutely correct, the best advice I can offer you on that front is use any urgent concerns/worry in a positive way...structure your focus...Make it work for you and don't let fear control your actions....that's how mistakes are made.

I'm telling you this from experience.....I went the "OMG I NEED IT ALL NOW" and spent thousands on freeze dried to bulk up in 1 week......Don't get me wrong, it did make me feel relief when it arrived, but looking back I really wish I approached it with a canned food rotation rack and those supplies instead.....a family as large as yours even as un-wielding as the #10 cans are they would be a great option for you where it's just too much in single servings for my family of 3.

Last echoed advice I'll second here is the garden....An immense resource. Knowledge, family time, and a self-sustaining resource for long term....Cant recommend enough getting the family involved in that one.

Regardless...being here and alert are the biggest steps....Congrats to you and your family. :thumbup:

Welcome to APN...

~D



.
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Re: New but slowly making progress

Postby Cin » Sun Sep 03, 2017 2:16 pm

In addition to the canned goods (which I highly recommend), if you have a membership at Sam's - get 100 pounds of rice (I think they're only 25 pound bags now). 100 pounds of rice makes 240 one cup servings. So it'd last 40 days with your family of 6.

Get 50 pounds of beans, too, in whatever increment they sell them (10 pound bags?). 1 pound of beans yields 6 cups of cooked beans. So 50 pounds of beans is 50 days of food.

Granted, you may not eat rice and beans daily, but if you had to, you could.

If you do this once a month, in 6 months, you'll have enough food for a year - it won't be the best food, but it'll sustain you for a while.

You might want to buy some other stuff, too - the big cans of hot chocolate mix, the sacks of flour (if you don't grind your own), the 25 lb. bag of popcorn, which can also be ground down into corn meal. Stock up on some of Sam's big containers of spices - Italian seasoning, steak rub and chicken rub.

You're off to a good start because you're here - don't be afraid to ask questions.

As always, I recommend you go in Disaster Preparedness forum, and click on the General Preparedness Discussion and read the "What Did You Do To Prep This Week/Month?" threads - especially the ones from years ago. A lot of people posted what they stocked each week and there is some really good advice in there.
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Re: New but slowly making progress

Postby angie_nrs » Mon Sep 04, 2017 7:35 pm

Well, you picked a good time of the year to get started. Now is the time to get your seeds and supplies to get started for gardening next year. Everything is on sale! You can find seeds in hardware stores like ACE or Menards for 5-20 cents per pack (if not right now, very soon).....keep your eyes open. You can also get any supplies you may need at a deep discount right now b/c stores are trying to clear the shelves for Christmas stuff.

Also within the next month you'll see the canned food sales (Fall Sales) at your local grocery stores. It's a great time to stock the pantry and save money to boot. I also hit the canned soup sales, which were just last week for me. Get rainchecks if you buy cases so that you don't clear the shelves....plus the rainchecks are usually good for 60 days giving you time to save up some money if need be. With kids, you might want to keep an eye out for good deals on the canned foods they eat like Ravioli, Chili, or Stew. Instead of buying long term storage type of foods like dehydrated Mountain House foods or such that can be expensive and may not get used, I would recommend things like the Knorr side dishes of pasta or rice. They are already in the proper package to last quite a while and they are likely something that you will use. Many people have found that it makes more sense to stock what they eat so that nothing gets wasted.

You can always use your old laundry detergent bottles to stock water on the cheap. That water can be used for washing up or flushing the toilet. That plastic is pretty durable and it's free! You just need the space for it.

Good luck and try not to get overwhelmed. There's lots to do and lots to learn. Start small and build up from there. I think you're on the right track starting with water and food. You've already gotten some great advise and APN is always here if you have questions. Welcome to the club!
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Re: New but slowly making progress

Postby MrDanB » Wed Sep 06, 2017 8:04 pm

Slim4182, Here's something to consider: It costs nothing to make up a plan. Grab a pad of paper and a pen and sit down with a beverage and draw yourself out a plan. Make headings for all of the main categories, for example: FOOD, WATER, MEDICAL, SECURITY etc. Next, write down as many possible things you think you would like in each category. Next, go through your place and see if anything is on that list. If it is, it's one less thing to have to buy.
With regards to food, I personally like to buy in bulk. Win Dixie / Winco has pretty good prices on bulk. If there's any "scratch n dent" places near you, go and stock up there. I have used the Mormon church's "Bishops storehouse" to get good deals on bulk as well. (I am not Mormon either. They are open to the public) Go to: Providentliving.org and look up where the nearest place is.
Thrift stores can be a great place to get all kinds of tools, sports equipment, games for kids etc. Prices are far better than retail.
Water and filtration: Several routes to go, but you do not want to get caught short on water! You can go longer without food than you can water. You do NOT need to run out and buy an expensive filtration system. There are plans here on this site to make your own or info on where to purchase quality filter kits that you can put together on the cheap. cheaperthandirt.com had a 2-bucket system with a spigot and filter on the cheap!
FREE food!?! I spent a few hours last weekend picking many blackberries. In fact many gallons of blackberries. How much were they? Glad you asked! FREE! Many other fruits and other plants grow wild in your area too. Just make sure to know who's property you're on when you gather... For the cost of a fishing license and some tackle you can catch fresh fish. Freeze in a "seal a meal" or smoke the fish and it will last longer. Have any dirt? learn about square foot or raised bed/row gardening. If I can do it, you can do it!lol
Skills- Read read read and then practice practice practice. It's free to read APN. Write on your calendar 1 skill you want to learn, then dive in and spend a little time each week learning and practicing that skill. For example, I was 40 before I learned to do laundry (not really, but you get the idea) Learn the rule of 3: 3 ways to build a fire, 3 ways to purify water, 3 ways to cook etc etc
The rest will come with time and money. If there is anything you can be frugal on, do it! Get rid of expensive habits that cut into your prepping lifestyle. Years ago, I got cheaper insurance, but with a better quality company by shopping around and reading, I ditched the latest greatest cell phone and bought a very inexpensive phone. I can call my friends and family with the best of them!lol, I learned to grow some of my own food and that cut down on my grocery bill, I learned to roast my own coffee, I now pay about 3 bucks per pound and it's better than most store bought coffee. The list is almost endless!
These are just a small cross section of how I tackled much of what you are going through now. I also agree that things are heating up in the world and that time is becoming a factor. STILL, I would never recommend going into debt to prepare. Remember that you have resources here on this site and most of us are a somewhat friendly bunch. Best of luck in your journey... :)
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Re: New but slowly making progress

Postby SSG Nasty » Wed Sep 13, 2017 3:12 pm

Howdy and welcome from AZ
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Re: New but slowly making progress

Postby kappydell » Wed Sep 20, 2017 11:10 pm

All good ideas mentioned here. As a long time prepper, most of my preps are/were put by on a low budget. Aldi's has the best retail prices I've seen, Sams club can vary - around here it is expensive. As a retired person with more time than money, perhaps you can use some of my research 'finds'....
1. Feed stores can be cheap sources of bulk grains, but you will have to put them into mylar or other storage on your own. You also need to make sure you purchase plain, untinkered with grain. But since the day a feed store employee told me he fed his own family from the feed store wheat & corn, I am comfortable with it. It hard to argue with being able to store whole dried field corn (for hominy, cornmeal, grits, etc) for the price of $12 for 50 lbs. Whole kernels of corn are superior anyway, as the natural oils in corn start turning rancid right after grinding.
I've also found red wheat in 50 lb sacks for a similar price. Very basic, but very cheap.
2. Check ethnic stores - you can often find terrific deals on rice and dried beans in a Mexican store, or an Indian store. Korean stores sometimes sell acorn flour (if you want to see how acorn meal would taste - might be nice to know if acorns are a potential resource). Canned goods from other countries often include foods you cant easily find canned in the US, but watch the prices.
3. Dented can places. I was lucky to find a canning company that sold dented cans (after they inspected them to make sure the seals were not affected) for $6 a case. Selection was whatever they had on hand, but generally I could get corn, green beans, beets & canned potatoes every time; other times I would find peas (I always grabbed those, they disappeared quickly), spinach, carrots, kraut, mixed vegetables and sometimes pickled beets or applesauce (in cases of glass jars). This place has a good turnover, as folks from several counties around would come to buy and their #10 cans ($1 apiece) were particularly popular with charity food kitchens, the VFW, and nursing homes. Its worth checking to see if there is such a place near you...I plan on returning annually (when I go to fish for Salmon) to stock up. Such a place is worth the search for it and imho will be worth the 480 mile drive to get to it annually after I move (unless I can find one closer).
4. Prep KNOWLEDGE, not stuff. Stuff can be taken/confiscated/stolen, get lost, break, and otherwise fail. Know-how (how to make a rocket stove from bricks lying around after a tornado hits, for example) can not be taken away from you and allows better improvisation to fit changing situations. The library is free; I used the free internet there for many years, downloading and taking notes, or putting on personal disks (and later thumb drives) until I could learn it, or print it out. Best though, is to try these new things out, learning as you go.
5. Learn to store and put up your own foods. A dehydrator is a good buy (often around Christmas) and you can easily dehydrated frozen veggies (no need to blanch, it is already done) easily, until you find alternate bulk food sources. 16 cups of frozen corn dries down to around 5 cups of dried corn - if your family likes corn, it is one of the most popular dried veggies, as it rehydrates well & with a good flavor & texture. You can also dry applesauce (on the little trays, or line your screen with plastic wrap) for home made fruit roll ups. Lots of fun, easy to do, takes only a little power. Canning is not all that hard, and canned foods are familiar comfort foods in a crisis. The canners can get expensive tho, so if you have an older relative with a canner, ask to borrow it (and maybe for lessons). Thrift shops in areas transitioning from rural to urban, or mixed areas often have canners available cheap. I got my first three canners for $10 each.

Yes, it can take a while, and in light of todays situations, I'd try to learn as much as possible of critical skills - what forage foods are in your particular area/neighborhood & how to cook them, how to make a shelter and a fire for starters. How to live reasonably well without power or help. A little networking is free. You are waaaay ahead of most folks in that you are aware of the need, and actively doing something. So congratulations, and keep up the good work.
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