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EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

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EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

Postby rickdun » Sun Sep 03, 2017 1:43 am

Note: A new month and we're still monitoring this. I almost forgot to start a new thread. What better way to start off the month than a new test? :bored: This time, it's a hydrogen test :o -k

Another nuclear test by the little fat dude:

http://www.cnn.com/2017/09/03/asia/nort ... index.html
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

Postby 3ADScout » Sun Sep 03, 2017 6:25 am

I knew about that almost instantaneously by accident. I have Quake feed on my iPhone and it is set to an audio alarm for Larger quakes. At 23:30 EST I got an alert for a 6.3 earthquake in NK and figured it was a nuke test. Quake Fees is a free app in the Apple iStore
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

Postby ReadyMom » Sun Sep 03, 2017 8:48 am

Putin: The North Korean situation is on the brink of war
http://www.uawire.org/putin-the-north-k ... ink-of-war

Friday, September 1, 2017

Russian President Vladimir Putin said that the situation on the Korean Peninsula is teetering on the brink of a large-scale conflict. He wrote this in an article on the eve of the BRICS summit, which will be held in Xiamen on September 4-5. The article was published on the Kremlin’s website.

“I cannot ignore the situation on the Korean Peninsula, which has recently escalated and is teetering on the edge of a large-scale conflict,” said the Russian president.

Putin stressed that, in Russia's opinion, the notion that it is possible to stop North Korea’s nuclear missile program solely by putting pressure on Pyongyang “is erroneous and unlikely to yield results.”

According to him, it is possible to solve the problems in the region through direct dialogue that involves all interested parties and without setting preliminary conditions.

“Provocation, pressure, and combative and insulting rhetoric is the way to nowhere," the Russian leader said.

On the night of August 29, North Korea launched a ballistic missile in the direction of Japan. It flew over the territory of the country and crashed into the waters of the Pacific Ocean. The missile traveled a distance of 2,700 kilometers and reached a maximum flight altitude of 550 kilometers.

The Hwasong-12 missile is the first North Korean missile in 20 years that can fly at such a high altitude over the territory of Japan.
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

Postby ReadyMom » Sun Sep 03, 2017 8:49 am

US ban on travel North Korea kicks in, with few exceptions
http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStor ... s-49578326

Sep 1, 2017,

A U.S. ban on Americans traveling to North Korea took effect Friday amid concerns about the fate of those who have been detained there in the past. The U.S. said its citizens can start applying for exceptions, but few will be granted.

The ban, announced by Secretary of State Rex Tillerson in July after the death of American student Otto Warmbier following his release from North Korea, makes U.S. passports invalid for travel to the North.

Americans who have a valid reason to travel to the North can still go under "extremely limited" circumstances, the State Department said, adding that applicants must prove their trip is in the U.S. national interest. Professional journalists assigned to collect information for public consumption about North Korea might be eligible, along with Red Cross representatives on officially sponsored missions. Humanitarian workers also could receive exemptions.

In new details released Friday about the exemption process, the State Department said applicants must email or mail a statement explaining why their trip serves the national interest, along with documentation to substantiate it. Applicants must also send a copy of their identification and contact information.

The State Department will notify applicants whether they've been deemed eligible or not. Those granted exceptions will receive a letter they can use to obtain a Special Validation Passport for a single trip to North Korea. For those denied, there is no appeal.

Under the law, Americans who violate the ban could face a fine and up to 10 years in prison for a first offense. The State Department has emphasized the possibility that those who violate the ban would have their passports revoked.

The ban comes amid heightened tensions over North Korea's recent provocations, including unprecedented intercontinental ballistic missile tests and other launches. The Trump administration and Kim Jong Un's government have been trading angry words and threats of military action, though tensions have calmed slightly in the past few weeks.

President Donald Trump spoke by phone Friday with South Korean President Moon Jae-In. The White House said they discussed ways to "strengthen South Korea's defense capabilities," including "planned purchases by South Korea of billions of dollars in American military equipment."

Moon's spokesman Park Su-hyun said Saturday that the leaders have agreed in principle that South Korea should be allowed to build more powerful missiles. South Korea's missile developments are limited by a bilateral "guideline" between the allies and Seoul is seeking to increase the warhead limits on its maximum range missiles that could reach 800 kilometers (497 miles).
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

Postby ReadyMom » Sun Sep 03, 2017 8:52 am

rickdun wrote:Another nuclear test by the little fat dude:

http://www.cnn.com/2017/09/03/asia/nort ... index.html


North Korea conducts 6th nuclear test, says it was H-bomb
http://abcnews.go.com/International/wir ... m-49589552

SEOUL, South Korea — Sep 3, 2017, 3:07 AM ET

North Korea said it set off a hydrogen bomb Sunday in its sixth nuclear test, which judging by the earthquake it set off appeared to be its most powerful explosion yet.

South Korea's weather agency estimated the nuclear blast yield of the presumed test was between 50 and 60 kilotons, or five to six times stronger than North Korea's fifth test in September 2016. That would mark a significant step forward in the North's quest for a viable nuclear missile capable of striking anywhere in the United States.

On North Korean television, a newsreader called the test a "complete success" and said the "two-stage thermonuclear weapon" had "unprecedented" strength. Hours earlier, Pyongyang claimed its leader had inspected a hydrogen bomb meant for a new intercontinental ballistic missile.

Seoul's weather agency and the Joint Chiefs of Staff said an artificial 5.7 magnitude quake occurred at 12:29 p.m. local time, in Kilju, northern Hamgyong province, the site where North Korea has conducted nuclear tests in the past. Seoul officials revised their earlier estimate of 5.6 magnitude quake. The U.S. Geological Survey called the first quake an explosion with a magnitude 6.3.

The U.S. State Department had no immediate reaction. South Korea's presidential office said it will hold a National Security Council meeting chaired by President Moon Jae-in. South Korea's military said it has strengthened its monitoring and readiness while mulling a variety of possible responses that could be executed in collaboration with the U.S.

Japan confirmed that North Korea conducted a nuclear test, Foreign Minister Taro Kono said. "It is absolutely unacceptable if North Korea did force another nuclear test, and we must protest strongly," Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said.

The USGS and China's earthquake administration detected a second tremor in North Korea minutes after the first, describing it as a cave-in or collapse. South Korea's weather agency, however, said no second quake occurred.

North Korea conducted two nuclear tests last year, the last nearly a year ago, on the Sept. 9 anniversary of the nation's founding. It has since maintained a torrid pace in weapons tests, including its first two intercontinental ballistic missiles test in July. Last month, North Korea fired a potentially nuclear-capable midrange missile over northern Japan.

Earlier Sunday, photos released by the North Korean government showed Kim talking with his lieutenants as he observed a silver, peanut-shaped device that was apparently the purported thermonuclear weapon destined for an ICBM. What appeared to be the nose cone of a missile could also be seen near the alleged bomb in one picture, which could not be independently verified and was taken without outside journalists present. Another photo showed a diagram on the wall behind Kim of a bomb mounted inside a cone.

State media said Kim visited the Nuclear Weapons Institute and inspected a "homemade" H-bomb with "super explosive power" that "is adjustable from tens (of) kiloton to hundreds (of) kiloton."

North Korea's nuclear and missile program has made huge strides since Kim rose to power following his father's death in late 2011. The North followed its two tests of Hwasong-14 ICBMs by threatening in August to launch a salvo of its Hwasong-12 intermediate range missiles toward the U.S. Pacific island territory of Guam.

It flew a Hwasong-12 over northern Japan last week, the first such overflight by a missile capable of carrying nukes, in a launch Kim described as a "meaningful prelude" to containing Guam, the home of major U.S. military facilities, and more ballistic missile tests targeting the Pacific.

It may be difficult for outside experts to confirm that the nuclear device detonated Sunday was an H-bomb. State media reported that the test left no trace of radioactive material. The U.S. and its allies attempt to detect blast material to gauge North Korea's progress, but Pyongyang has become better at containing it as its nuclear program has evolved.

To back up its claims to nuclear mastery, such tests are vital. The first of its two atomic tests last year involved what Pyongyang claimed was a sophisticated hydrogen bomb; the second it said was its most powerful atomic detonation ever.

It is almost impossible to independently confirm North Korean statements about its highly secret weapons program. South Korean government officials said the estimated explosive yield of last year's first test was much smaller than what even a failed hydrogen bomb detonation would produce. There was speculation that North Korea might have detonated a boosted fission bomb, a weapon considered halfway between an atomic bomb and an H-bomb.

It is clear, however, that each new missile and nuclear test gives the North invaluable information that allows big jumps in capability. A key question is how far North Korea has gotten in efforts to consistently shrink down nuclear warheads so they can fit on long-range missiles.

North Korea is thought to have a growing arsenal of nuclear bombs and has spent decades trying to perfect a multistage, long-range missile to eventually carry smaller versions of those bombs.

South Korea's main spy agency has previously asserted that it does not think Pyongyang currently has the ability to develop miniaturized nuclear weapons that can be mounted on long-range ballistic missiles. Some experts disagree.

The White House said President Donald Trump spoke with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan regarding "ongoing efforts to maximize pressure on North Korea." The statement did not say whether the conversation came before or after the North's latest claim.

A long line of U.S. presidents has failed to check North Korea's persistent pursuit of missiles and nuclear weapons. Six-nation negotiations on dismantling North Korea's nuclear program in exchange for aid fell apart in early 2009.

The North said in its statement Sunday that its H-bomb "is a multi-functional thermonuclear nuke with great destructive power which can be detonated even at high altitudes for super-powerful EMP (electromagnetic pulse) attack according to strategic goals."

Kim, according to the statement carried by the state-run Korean Central News Agency, claimed that "all components of the H-bomb were homemade ... thus enabling the country to produce powerful nuclear weapons as many as it wants."

In what could be read as a veiled warning of more nuclear tests, Kim underlined the need for scientists to "dynamically conduct the campaign for successfully concluding the final-stage research and development for perfecting the state nuclear force" and "set forth tasks to be fulfilled in the research into nukes."

The two Koreas have shared the world's most heavily fortified border since their war in the early 1950s ended with an armistice, not a peace treaty. About 28,500 American troops are deployed in South Korea as deterrence against North Korea.
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

Postby ReadyMom » Sun Sep 03, 2017 9:00 am

North Korea claims hydrogen bomb test was 'perfect success,' 6th nuclear test
http://www.foxnews.com/world/2017/09/03 ... -test.html

September 03, 2017

North Korea said on Sunday it detonated a hydrogen bomb, possibly triggering an artificial earthquake and prompting immediate condemnation from its neighbors -- despite the rogue regime calling the test a "perfect success."

The blast, carried out at 12:29 p.m. local time at the Punggye-ri site, triggered a magnitude 6.3 earthquake in North Korea, the U.S. Geological Survey reported, though officials in Seoul said it was a magnitude 5.7 quake.

Yonhap News Agency @YonhapNews

(URGENT) North Korea says it conducted H-bomb test http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/news/20 ... 51315.html
2:33 AM - Sep 3, 2017


Just hours before Sunday's test, photos emerged showing the North Korean dictator inspecting a new thermonuclear warhead in a lab. This would be North Korea's sixth nuclear test and first since September 2016.

President Trump condemned the test on Twitter Sunday morning.

"North Korea has conducted a major Nuclear Test. Their words and actions continue to be very hostile and dangerous to the United States," Trump tweeted.

Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump

North Korea has conducted a major Nuclear Test. Their words and actions continue to be very hostile and dangerous to the United States.....
7:30 AM - Sep 3, 2017



Published September 03, 2017
Fox News

Benjamin Hall has the details



North Korea said on Sunday it detonated a hydrogen bomb, possibly triggering an artificial earthquake and prompting immediate condemnation from its neighbors -- despite the rogue regime calling the test a "perfect success."

The blast, carried out at 12:29 p.m. local time at the Punggye-ri site, triggered a magnitude 6.3 earthquake in North Korea, the U.S. Geological Survey reported, though officials in Seoul said it was a magnitude 5.7 quake.

Just hours before Sunday's test, photos emerged showing the North Korean dictator inspecting a new thermonuclear warhead in a lab. This would be North Korea's sixth nuclear test and first since September 2016.

President Trump condemned the test on Twitter Sunday morning.

"North Korea has conducted a major Nuclear Test. Their words and actions continue to be very hostile and dangerous to the United States," Trump tweeted.

"North Korea is a rogue nation which has become a great threat and embarrassment to China, which is trying to help but with little success," he added. "South Korea is finding, as I have told them, that their talk of appeasement with North Korea will not work, they only understand one thing!"

Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump

..North Korea is a rogue nation which has become a great threat and embarrassment to China, which is trying to help but with little success.
7:39 AM - Sep 3, 2017


Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump

South Korea is finding, as I have told them, that their talk of appeasement with North Korea will not work, they only understand one thing!
7:46 AM - Sep 3, 2017


The test was estimated to have a yield of 100 kilotons, meaning a blast that was four to five times more powerful than the explosion in Nagasaki, Japan, in 1945, a South Korean defense official told the country's Yonhap News Agency.

Pentagon officials told Fox News early Sunday that the U.S. government would have no official response until after the U.S. fully assesses what happened.

South Korea's presidential office said the security chiefs for Seoul and Washington have spoken. The office said U.S. National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster spoke with his South Korean counterpart, Chung Eui-yong, for 20 minutes in an emergency phone call about an hour after the detonation.

The epicenter was determined to be at a well-known North Korean test site, according to media reports. U.S. intelligence agencies have been closely watching the test site since at least March, when initial signs of test preparations were visible.

Yonhap News Agency @YonhapNews

(LEAD) Top security chiefs of S. Korea, U.S. discuss N.K. nuke test http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/news/20 ... 51315.html
3:12 AM - Sep 3, 2017
Photo published for (LEAD) Top security chiefs of S. Korea, U.S. discuss N.K. nuke test
(LEAD) Top security chiefs of S. Korea, U.S. discuss N.K. nuke test

The top security officials of South Korea and the United States on Sunday discussed how to deal with the aftermath of North Korea's sixth nuclear test, Seoul's presidential office Cheong Wa Dae said.



Published September 03, 2017
Fox News

Benjamin Hall has the details

North Korea said on Sunday it detonated a hydrogen bomb, possibly triggering an artificial earthquake and prompting immediate condemnation from its neighbors -- despite the rogue regime calling the test a "perfect success."

The blast, carried out at 12:29 p.m. local time at the Punggye-ri site, triggered a magnitude 6.3 earthquake in North Korea, the U.S. Geological Survey reported, though officials in Seoul said it was a magnitude 5.7 quake.

Just hours before Sunday's test, photos emerged showing the North Korean dictator inspecting a new thermonuclear warhead in a lab. This would be North Korea's sixth nuclear test and first since September 2016.

President Trump condemned the test on Twitter Sunday morning.

"North Korea has conducted a major Nuclear Test. Their words and actions continue to be very hostile and dangerous to the United States," Trump tweeted.

"North Korea is a rogue nation which has become a great threat and embarrassment to China, which is trying to help but with little success," he added. "South Korea is finding, as I have told them, that their talk of appeasement with North Korea will not work, they only understand one thing!"

The test was estimated to have a yield of 100 kilotons, meaning a blast that was four to five times more powerful than the explosion in Nagasaki, Japan, in 1945, a South Korean defense official told the country's Yonhap News Agency.
In this undated image distributed on Sunday, Sept. 3, 2017, by the North Korean government, shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at an undisclosed location. North Korea’s state media on Sunday, Sept 3, 2017, said leader Kim Jong Un inspected the loading of a hydrogen bomb into a new intercontinental ballistic missile, a claim to technological mastery that some outside experts will doubt but that will raise already high worries on the Korean Peninsula. Independent journalists were not given access to cover the event depicted in this image distributed by the North Korean government. The content of this image is as provided and cannot be independently verified. (Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP) Expand / Collapse

North Korea released photos of Kim Jong Un on Sunday showing him inspecting the loading of a possible hydrogen bomb into a new intercontinental ballistic missile. (AP)

Pentagon officials told Fox News early Sunday that the U.S. government would have no official response until after the U.S. fully assesses what happened.

South Korea's presidential office said the security chiefs for Seoul and Washington have spoken. The office said U.S. National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster spoke with his South Korean counterpart, Chung Eui-yong, for 20 minutes in an emergency phone call about an hour after the detonation.

The epicenter was determined to be at a well-known North Korean test site, according to media reports. U.S. intelligence agencies have been closely watching the test site since at least March, when initial signs of test preparations were visible.

U.S. officials at the time told Fox News to expect a nuclear test in the near future. Now, more than five months later, the rogue communist regime appears to have followed through.

In his New Year's address, Kim Jung Un said his nation had entered the "final stage" preparing for the test launch of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In July, North Korea successfully test-fired two ICBMs.

The U.S. Air Force has WC-135 "sniffer" planes in Japan that will be measuring the air samples near the Korean Peninsula to confirm the presence of radioactive particles in the atmosphere and confirm the nuclear test. The Japanese military also has radiological detection equipment in some of its jets as well.

On Thursday, Defense Secretary James Mattis declined to comment when Fox News asked if the Pentagon was seeing evidence of an upcoming nuclear test in North Korea.

The previous day, before sitting next to his South Korean counterpart, Mattis said "We are not out of diplomatic options."

The quake was detected at 12:36 p.m. in North Korea’s North Hamgyeong province, Yonhap reported, citing information from the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA). Reuters gave the location as 55 kilometers north northwest of Kimchaek, citing U.S. Geological Survey information. There were no immediate reports of damage or casualties, the news agency said.

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said he "strongly condemn" the sixth nuclear test, saying it was a "flagrant violation of multiple U.N. Security Council resolutions."

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson had recently said North Korea was showing "restraint" in its recent actions.

"Pyongyang has certainly demonstrated some level of restraint that we’ve not seen in the past," he said at the State Department.

President Trump, at a rally in Phoenix in late August, said North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un was starting to "respect" the United States.

n April, Tillerson told Fox News' Bret Baier that China had asked North Korea not to conduct any more nuclear tests.

“We’re asking a lot of the Chinese,” Tillerson said at the time. “We are going to test China’s willingness to help address this serious threat.”

'Absolutely unacceptable'

Early Sunday, Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe quickly commented that if the quake was indeed a nuclear test by North Korea, it would be "absolutely unacceptable."

The quake came just hours after the regime of leader Kim Jong Un bragged of developing a more advanced nuclear warhead, Britain’s Guardian reported. The epicenter of the quake was estimated to be at 10 kilometers underground, the U.S. Geological Survey said.

The Kim regime has been engaged in a heated rhetorical battle with the United States in recent months – largely because of missile tests North Korea has conducted.

Shortly after the initial quake, Yonhap said a second quake was detected with a magnitude 4.6, but South Korea's weather agency denied another quake occurred. There was no word from the military in Seoul about the possible second quake.

North Korea conducted its fifth test last year in September. In confirmed, the latest test would mark yet another big step forward in North Korean attempts to obtain a nuclear-armed missile capable of reaching deep into the U.S. mainland.

The U.S. State Department had no immediate reaction. South Korea's presidential office said it will hold a National Security Council meeting chaired by President Moon Jae-in.

David Albright, President of the Washington-based Institute for Science and International Security, wrote in a report last month "developing thermonuclear weapons was declared priority of North Korea."

"It appears capable of developing thermonuclear weapons. It is far more likely to be working on one-stage thermonuclear weapons rather than traditional two-stage thermonuclear weapons, or 'H-Bombs,'" Albright wrote.

Torrid pace

North Korea conducted two nuclear tests last year and has since maintained a torrid pace in weapons tests, including flight-testing developmental intercontinental ballistic missiles and flying a powerful midrange missile over Japan.

Earlier Sunday, photos released by the North Korean government showed Kim talking with his lieutenants as he observed a silver, peanut-shaped device that was apparently the purported thermonuclear weapon destined for an ICBM. What appeared to be the nose cone of a missile could also be seen near the alleged bomb in one picture, which could not be independently verified and which was taken without outside journalists present. Another photo showed a diagram on the wall behind Kim of a bomb mounted inside a cone.

Aside from the factuality of the North's claim, the language in its statement seems a strong signal that Pyongyang will soon conduct its sixth nuclear weapon test, which is crucial if North Korean scientists are to fulfill the national goal of an arsenal of viable nuclear ICBMs that can reach the U.S. mainland. There's speculation that such a test could come on or around the Sept. 9 anniversary of North Korea's national founding, something it did last year.

As part of the North's weapons work, Kim was said by his propaganda mavens to have made a visit to the Nuclear Weapons Institute and inspected a "homemade" H-bomb with "super explosive power" that "is adjustable from tens (of) kiloton to hundreds (of) kiloton."

Jump in progress

North Korea in July conducted its first ever ICBM tests, part of a stunning jump in progress for the country's nuclear and missile program since Kim rose to power following his father's death in late 2011. The North followed its two tests of Hwasong-14 ICBMs, which, when perfected, could target large parts of the United States, by threatening to launch a salvo of its Hwasong-12 intermediate range missiles toward the U.S. Pacific island territory of Guam in August.

It flew a Hwasong-12 over northern Japan last week, the first such overflight by a missile capable of carrying nukes, in a launch Kim described as a "meaningful prelude" to containing Guam, the home of major U.S. military facilities, and more ballistic missile tests targeting the Pacific.

Vipin Narang, an MIT professor specializing in nuclear strategy, said it's important to note that North Korea was only showing a mockup of a two-stage thermonuclear device, or H-bomb. "We won't know what they have until they test it, and even then there may be a great deal of uncertainty depending on the yield and seismic signature and any isotopes we can detect after a test," he said.

To back up its claims to nuclear mastery, such tests are vital. The first of its two atomic tests last year involved what Pyongyang claimed was a sophisticated hydrogen bomb; the second it said was its most powerful atomic detonation ever.

It is almost impossible to independently confirm North Korean statements about its highly secret weapons program. South Korean government officials said the estimated explosive yield of last year's first test was much smaller than what even a failed hydrogen bomb detonation would produce. There was speculation that North Korea might have detonated a boosted fission bomb, a weapon considered halfway between an atomic bomb and an H-bomb.

Invaluable information

It is clear, however, that each new missile and nuclear test gives the North invaluable information that allows big jumps in capability. A key question is how far North Korea has gotten in efforts to consistently shrink down nuclear warheads so they can fit on long-range missiles.

"Though we cannot verify the claim, (North Korea) wants us to believe that it can launch a thermonuclear strike now, if it is attacked. Importantly, (North Korea) will also want to test this warhead, probably at a larger yield, to demonstrate this capability," said Adam Mount, a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress.

North Korea is thought to have a growing arsenal of nuclear bombs and has spent decades trying to perfect a multistage, long-range missile to eventually carry smaller versions of those bombs.

South Korea's main spy agency has previously asserted that it does not think Pyongyang currently has the ability to develop miniaturized nuclear weapons that can be mounted on long-range ballistic missiles. Some experts, however, think the North may have mastered this technology.

The White House said that President Donald Trump spoke with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan regarding "ongoing efforts to maximize pressure on North Korea." The statement did not say whether the conversation came before or after the North's latest claim.

A long line of U.S. presidents has failed to check North Korea's persistent pursuit of missiles and nuclear weapons. Six-nation negotiations on dismantling North Korea's nuclear program in exchange for aid fell apart in early 2009.

'Great destructive power'

The North said in its statement Sunday that its H-bomb "is a multi-functional thermonuclear nuke with great destructive power which can be detonated even at high altitudes for super-powerful EMP (electromagnetic pulse) attack according to strategic goals."

Kim, according to the statement carried by the state-run Korean Central News Agency, claimed that "all components of the H-bomb were homemade ... thus enabling the country to produce powerful nuclear weapons as many as it wants."

In what could be read as a veiled warning of more nuclear tests, Kim underlined the need for scientists to "dynamically conduct the campaign for successfully concluding the final-stage research and development for perfecting the state nuclear force" and "set forth tasks to be fulfilled in the research into nukes."

The two Koreas have shared the world's most heavily fortified border since their war in the early 1950s ended with an armistice, not a peace treaty. About 28,500 American troops are deployed in South Korea as deterrence against North Korea.
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

Postby ReadyMom » Sun Sep 03, 2017 1:49 pm

Sharing ... cause you all know how I feel about Dr. Pry's thoughts on the topic!

North Korea just might be able to win a war, if it begins with an EMP in Tokyo
http://thehill.com/blogs/pundits-blog/d ... ns-with-an

North Korea has nuclear-armed missiles and satellites potentially capable of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) attack. EMP is considered by many the most politically acceptable use of a nuclear weapon, because the high-altitude detonation (above 30 kilometers) produces no blast, thermal, or radioactive fallout effects harmful to people.

EMP itself is harmless to people, destroying only electronics. But by destroying electric grids and other life-sustaining critical infrastructures, the indirect effects of EMP can kill far more people in the long-run than nuclear blasting a city.

In this scenario, North Korea makes an EMP attack on Japan and South Korea to achieve its three most important foreign policy goals: reunification with South Korea, revenge upon Japan for World War II, and recognition of North Korea as a world power.

Revenge against Tokyo is a convenient rationale for someday attacking Japan. War against Japan will be necessary for the North to conquer South Korea, as Japan is an indispensable staging area for U.S. and allied forces defending South Korea.



North Korea's dictator, Kim Jong Un, is the scion of three generations of totalitarian rule, a megalomaniac and ruthless murderer described by state media as a demigod having supernatural powers.

Kim’s strategy is to sever U.S. security guarantees to South Korea and Japan by raising the stakes too high—raising the specter of nuclear war—and through "nuclear diplomacy" to cow the U.S. and its allies into submission.

In this scenario, North Korea detonates a nuclear weapon at 96 kilometers HOB (height of burst) over Tokyo. The EMP field extends from the Japanese capital to a radius of 1,080 kilometers, covering all of Japan's major home islands.

Virtually all of Japan's major military bases and seaports are covered by the EMP field, rendering them inoperable. Traffic control towers and systems are damaged and blacked-out stopping air and rail traffic. Highways are jammed with stalled vehicles. Communications systems are damaged or destroyed or in blackout.

Worse, Japan's population of 126 million people is at risk because suddenly there is no running water or food coming into the cities. EMP induced industrial accidents are happening everywhere. Gas pipelines are exploding and turning into firestorms in towns and cities. Refineries and chemical plants are exploding, releasing toxic clouds and poisonous spills. Tokyo knows from the experience of Fukushima that as the nationwide blackout becomes protracted, within days Japan's nuclear reactors will exhaust their emergency power supplies and begin exploding, contaminating the home islands with radioactivity.

As a consequence of the EMP attack, Japan's critical infrastructures are paralyzed and incapable of transporting U.S. forces to aid South Korea. Indeed, with Japan's survival at risk, Tokyo would probably oppose any effort to help South Korea by U.S. forces staging from Japan, fearing another North Korean EMP attack.

The EMP field also covers the eastern half of South Korea, including the vital seaport of Busan (the key to South Korea's survival and U.S. victory in the last Korean War). All the eastern coastal seaports, and all military bases and airfields in the eastern half of South Korea (nearest Japan) are under the EMP field.

The EMP field does not extend to North Korea.

Left uncovered by the EMP field are the western half of South Korea, including Seoul, the capital, and the major highway systems radiating around and from Seoul southward—the best invasion routes. Stalled traffic from the EMP will not be blocking Seoul or the highways.

U.S. and South Korean forces covering the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) will not be covered by the EMP field. The EMP field, in their immediate rear area, will cause cascading failures of the electric grid throughout the DMZ and the entirety of South Korea.

Thus, even those U.S. and South Korean forces not covered by the EMP field will be in a paralyzing protracted blackout that will cripple or deny allied forces communications, transportation, food and water, supplies and reinforcements from South Korean bases or from overseas.

The EMP attack creates conditions for North Korea's conquest of South Korea that are ideal.

North Korean armor and infantry pours across the DMZ, thrusting through and around Seoul and down the coastal highways, flanking U.S. and allied forces paralyzed by EMP and unable to maneuver.

U.S. nuclear missiles and bombers start blasting North Korea’s nuclear forces and underground bunkers where the Dear Leader may be hiding. Now Kim Jong Un knows he has miscalculated. The U.S. is no paper tiger.

In a final act of vengeance, Kim detonates the super-EMP warhead in his KMS-4 satellite, blacking out the United States.

Airliners crash. Communications and transportation stop. Natural gas pipelines explode, causing firestorms in cities. In seven days, 100 U.S. nuclear reactors go Fukushima. In a year, most Americans are dead from starvation.

The United States, Japan, South Korea, and North Korea are in ruins.

Russia and China are the winners.

Mr. President, harden the U.S. electrical grid to defend against an EMP attack, and shoot down those North Korean satellites!

Dr. Peter Vincent Pry is chief of staff of the Congressional EMP Commission. He served on the staff of the House Armed Services Committee and at the CIA.
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

Postby anita » Sun Sep 03, 2017 3:36 pm

And all of Europe, along with our troops there, just sit there watching TV? And I didn't see our nuclear subs or warships mentioned. They, apparently, are just floating around letting things go to rubble.

There are any number of ways things could play out if NK is foolish enough to try something (and don't forget that their rockets aren't exactly precise. They could go off far afield of their intended targets.) This is just one far-fetched scenario.
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

Postby Illini Warrior » Sun Sep 03, 2017 5:19 pm

and we have a huge anniversary date for the North Koreans on the 9th - a nuke testing was already predicted for the date - it's almost become a yearly event ...

Does the Little Fat Boy have an even bigger event planned?
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

Postby ReadyMom » Sun Sep 03, 2017 7:02 pm

Mattis says any threat to U.S., allies will be met with "massive" military response
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/mattis-thr ... -response/

September 3, 2017

Hours after North Korea's latest nuclear provocation, U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis said that any threat to the U.S. "will be met with a massive military response."

"Any threat to the United States or its territories, including Guam or our allies, will be met with a massive military response -- a response both effective and overwhelming," Mattis said.

Mattis said that all members of the U.N. Security Council "unanimously agreed on the threat North Korea poses" and remain committed to the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.

While he said America does not seek the "total annihilation" of the North, he added, "We have many options to do so."

Mattis, who did not take questions from reporters, said he had attended a "small group" national security meeting with President Trump and others. He said the president wanted to be briefed on each of what Mattis called "many military options" for action against North Korea.

"We made clear that we have the ability to defend ourselves and our allies, South Korea and Japan, from any attacks, and our commitments among the allies are ironclad," he said.

Earlier, President Trump raised the stakes in the escalating crisis over North Korea's nuclear threats, suggesting drastic economic measures against China and criticizing ally South Korea.

"The United States is considering, in addition to other options, stopping all trade with any country doing business with North Korea," he also tweeted. --- CONTINUED at link, above ----
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

Postby Mollypup » Mon Sep 04, 2017 12:29 am

anita wrote:And all of Europe, along with our troops there, just sit there watching TV? And I didn't see our nuclear subs or warships mentioned. They, apparently, are just floating around letting things go to rubble.

There are any number of ways things could play out if NK is foolish enough to try something (and don't forget that their rockets aren't exactly precise. They could go off far afield of their intended targets.) This is just one far-fetched scenario.


Anita, you forget that the powers that be need this war. If they didn't, Little Fat Man would've been dealt with a very long time ago, quickly & quietly. Poof!


I have a feeling when those EMPs are launched, they'll hit all intended targets at nearly the same time, including the US. Even if LFM believes himself to be a demigod, his military advisors area going to keep their chances of survival as high as possible. Either that or the US strike will come first. Otherwise........it gives us far too much time for retaliation they know is going to come.

IF LFM manages to hit us with a successful EMP........I have strong doubts about our retaliation. Mainly because that leaves the US a big fat sitting duck for invasion by anyone with such an inclination. I wouldn't be surprised if our focus wouldn't be on protecting the home front. No telling what our allies or the rest of the world's reaction would be mainly because there is no way to know how Russia & China would react to such a successful attack. We've got powerful allies, yes, but just how powerful are they without our military machine to back them up? Will they want to risk the same fate or worse...a full scale nuclear war?
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

Postby 3ADScout » Mon Sep 04, 2017 7:30 am

Mollypup wrote:Even if LFM believes himself to be a demigod, his military advisors area going to keep their chances of survival as high as possible.


One of my friends' father was a High ranking minister in the cabinet of a dictator. I got to meet him and he was a big fan of our founding fathers. I asked my friend how someone, like his dad, who valued freedom so much could work for a dictator? Learned a lot by his answer- he said you only tell a dictator "no" once. Don't think for a minute that Kim's underlings will not follow orders because if they don't it is a death sentence. Also they have been shooting so many missiles of they probably won't even know it isn't a test.
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

Postby 3ADScout » Mon Sep 04, 2017 7:40 am

I am starting to think Kim is conditioning us (Japan, SK and US) with his missile test. Like Palvo's Dogs Kim shoots missiles over Japan and other times he shoots multiple missiles off. Is he conditioning us to think when we see multiple missile lunch and flying over Japan, etc that it is just another "test"?

Why didn't Japan/US use THADD to shoot down that missile going over Japan? Did they value the Intel gathered by watching more than Japan and US military resources stationed there? In my mind the risk verses gain/threat assessment would indicate the need to shoot anything coming towards and over our allies down.
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

Postby TRex2 » Mon Sep 04, 2017 8:30 am

3ADScout wrote:I am starting to think Kim is conditioning us (Japan, SK and US) with his missile test. Like Palvo's Dogs Kim shoots missiles over Japan and other times he shoots multiple missiles off. Is he conditioning us to think when we see multiple missile lunch and flying over Japan, etc that it is just another "test"?

That may be. It is having very limited success.

Why didn't Japan/US use THADD to shoot down that missile going over Japan? Did they value the Intel gathered by watching more than Japan and US military resources stationed there? In my mind the risk verses gain/threat assessment would indicate the need to shoot anything coming towards and over our allies down.
Two reasons. First, the "T" in THAAD stands for Teminal. It would have had to be launched against the missile from out at sea. It is designed to shoot down a missile coming, essentially, directly towards it.

So far, our midcourse intercept capabilities are iffy.

Second, yes, we gain intel each time he launches.
And he has one less missile to launch later.
Calling Islam a religion isn't much different than calling Nazism or Communism a religion.
Both were also political movements with a religious component, just like Islam.
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

Postby anita » Mon Sep 04, 2017 9:43 am

Mollypup wrote:
anita wrote:And all of Europe, along with our troops there, just sit there watching TV? And I didn't see our nuclear subs or warships mentioned. They, apparently, are just floating around letting things go to rubble.

There are any number of ways things could play out if NK is foolish enough to try something (and don't forget that their rockets aren't exactly precise. They could go off far afield of their intended targets.) This is just one far-fetched scenario.


Anita, you forget that the powers that be need this war. If they didn't, Little Fat Man would've been dealt with a very long time ago, quickly & quietly. Poof!


I have a feeling when those EMPs are launched, they'll hit all intended targets at nearly the same time, including the US. Even if LFM believes himself to be a demigod, his military advisors area going to keep their chances of survival as high as possible. Either that or the US strike will come first. Otherwise........it gives us far too much time for retaliation they know is going to come.

IF LFM manages to hit us with a successful EMP........I have strong doubts about our retaliation. Mainly because that leaves the US a big fat sitting duck for invasion by anyone with such an inclination. I wouldn't be surprised if our focus wouldn't be on protecting the home front. No telling what our allies or the rest of the world's reaction would be mainly because there is no way to know how Russia & China would react to such a successful attack. We've got powerful allies, yes, but just how powerful are they without our military machine to back them up? Will they want to risk the same fate or worse...a full scale nuclear war?


But Molly, if they needed this war (not saying they don't didn't they need it last year or the year before? How about 2008 or 2009--didn't we need it then?

My point is that I doubt he can hit everywhere and everything at once. And, if that's the case, then our troops in Europe or floating around at sea, or the British, French (and good grief, I hope we don't have to rely on the French) etc, are going to take him and his minions out. They aren't just going to be bystanders.
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